The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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  2. GreatD

    GreatD Notebook Consultant

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    Hi all. Just a question, could a whea error from HWINFO app stating "CPU L2 cache errors" be related to undervolting to much on Throttlestop and incurs errors on HWINFO In return. Should i increase voltage or is my CPU faulty and in return my whole Motherboard faulty? Would appreciate any insight on this matter and what tests can run to determine if my hardware is at fault or it's just my undervolt? Thanks all. I apologize in advance If this is a silly noob question :)
     
  3. ananas

    ananas Notebook Guru

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    I think I've read you saying somewhere you included those in the TS exe file. Maybe I misunderstood. I'll try the ms packages, thank you for the link and explanation.

    Regarding staying on 8.50, does it cause any bugs with the Task Manager on 1809?
     
  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    WHEA errors are errors that Windows keeps track of. HWiNFO is just reporting that information from Windows. WHEA errors are a sign that your computer is not stable. If I was undervolting, this is definitely a sign that you have probably gone too far. At this stage you cannot blame your CPU or your motherboard. Give your CPU the Intel recommended voltage and see if these errors go away.

    This might be a sign that your cache needs more voltage than your CPU. Undervolting is always a compromise. Use as much voltage as you need to be stable.

    What sort of bugs? I have not heard of any issues.

    I thought I did but I might have done something wrong. Last time I installed Windows 10 Pro, I do not remember installing any of the Redistributable files and ThrottleStop worked just fine. You are on a different version of Windows 10 so it must not include some files that ThrottleStop needs. Too many versions of everything these days. All I know is that if a user is having any mfc120 related problems, installing the Redistributables directly from the Microsoft site will fix this problem. Start with the x86 Redistributables and if TS still doesn't work, add the x64 ones too. Some users have said you need both of them.
     
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  5. CedricFP

    CedricFP Notebook Evangelist

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    I've just started using TS (and loving it over XTU) and I've got a question, many thanks in advance for your help.

    In the "TPL" menu, there's "Intel Power Balance" with Intel CPU at 9, and Intel GPU at 13. What does this setting do?

    Also, what does "clamp" mean for turbo boost power max?

    Thanks.
     
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  6. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    In theory, this setting would let a user decide how much power went to the Intel CPU and how much power went to the Intel GPU before throttling begins. If you had a low power U CPU with a 15 Watt long term TDP rating, maybe some tasks would work best with 10 Watts going to the CPU and only 5 Watts going to the GPU. For gaming on the Intel GPU, maybe more watts being allocated for the Intel GPU would allow better frame rates. To be honest, it is kind of a hokey setting and the majority of users are probably not going to have any use for this. If you do your gaming on the Nvidia GPU then I do not think there is anything to gain by adjusting this setting. It never hurts to try different settings though.

    When a CPU has to throttle, the Clamp option determines whether the CPU will go down to the default non-turbo speed or whether the CPU will go lower than the default non-turbo speed. Clamp forces the CPU to run as slow as it needs to run so it does not exceed the requested power limit. Most laptop bios versions seem to default the Clamp option to checked or enabled. I hate throttling so I always turn Clamp off.
     
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  7. CedricFP

    CedricFP Notebook Evangelist

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    Thanks for the explanation,
    @unclewebb it is very much appreciated.

    Regarding intel power balance, I do actually have a handheld unit (GPD Win 2) which has a Core M3 7Y30 which is Kaby Lake generation. Do you know if it would work here?

    Since for the majority of games it is GPU limited, being able to divert more power to the GPU and less to the CPU while staying within the same package power (7w default) would be really good.

    If so, what do the numbers represent? On my laptop, it has 9 and 13. Are these a ratio?

    Thank you in advance for your reply!
     
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    I have never played with a Core m3-7Y30 or similar but I think it supports the Intel Power Balance feature. The last laptop I remember using Intel Power Balance on was a 3rd Gen U CPU so this feature has been around for a while. My laptop also uses the default settings of 9 and 13.
    You can adjust each setting from 0 to 31. If you want your Intel GPU to get the majority of the power budget you would set the Intel GPU to 31 and the Intel CPU to 0. When set like this, when you reach the 7W power limit, the CPU cores should throttle first to stay within the power budget. This should be better for gaming. Give it a try.
     
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  9. Jena_Plissken

    Jena_Plissken Notebook Consultant

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    I was asking me... is there a way (or will there ever be one) in TS to selectively disable cpu cores on the go?

    Both the Windows-related methods I know are not direct, they require a system reboot or the creation of a batch file with command lines for each application. I think it might be good to have such a feature in TS, if there isn't one already.
     
  10. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Deity

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    I don't think there is really any reason or benefit from this considering the excellent sleep states we have available on the newest generations of Intel i CPUs. It would be a moot option imo as the power savings would be negligible at best and non-existent at worst.

    What generation CPU did you have in mind that you are wanting to use this feature on?
     
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