The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    10,333
    Messages:
    10,989
    Likes Received:
    8,358
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Yes unclewebb it was improperly configured HWP setting. Sometimes you get confused why CPU don't maintain rated clocks. So I thought 55C at 500MHz was really odd and it was artificial FW and DPTF throttling.
    After setting up SST the temps are really good in @simcha binyamin katsof screenshot.
     
  2. Tofacitinib

    Tofacitinib Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I'm a i7 8750H user. SpeedShift was disabled by default on my bios. I enabled it and my formerly stable -170 mV undervolt became unstable and started giving me bsods. I had been using my cpu at -170 mV for weeks without a single problem. Is there something with the SpeedShift technology that makes the cpu less tolerant to undervolting?
     
  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

    Reputations:
    7,466
    Messages:
    6,234
    Likes Received:
    6,190
    Trophy Points:
    681
    1.8% when idle is still a little high but it is a lot better than your previous screenshot.

    Why would you not want to run ThrottleStop? It lets you adjust the voltage of your CPU so it can perform faster and cooler. It also shows you that your CPU is being limited to Package C3. You should ask Dell why your laptop is not using the power saving features that your CPU is capable of using. If the CPU was allowed to use Package C8, battery run time would probably be much improved.

    Idle temps would also be better if package C8 was being used.

    @Tofacitinib - I have not tested this but other users have reported the exact same thing. You cannot undervolt as much when Speed Shift is enabled. Speed Shift allows the CPU to change speeds much faster so it makes sense that a CPU might need a little more voltage to remain stable when this is happening. Intel might not have noticed this problem because at default voltage where they do their testing, this would never be a problem. I am sure at default voltage that your CPU is 100% stable whether Speed Shift is enabled or not.

    For some CPUs, a -170 mV undervolt is living on the edge. Have you run a variety of stress tests or do you go by, if it is stable for daily use then it is stable? Look in the Windows logs for WHEA errors. I like running a thread or two of Prime95 Small FFTs. Windows should rapidly move the load around from core to core which is just as important as a full load test. An 8750H will also switch back and forth to a higher multiplier when lightly loaded.

    Would an undervolt of -160 mV make your CPU stable with Speed Shift enabled? It is your call. If you have to add 60 mV or 70 mV to your CPU just to get Speed Shift stable then it is definitely not worth it. Speed Shift is just one more item that Windows 10 is forcing onto people's computers whether they like it or not.
     
  4. THE-HL

    THE-HL Notebook Geek

    Reputations:
    11
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Sorry for dumb question but what is processor duty cycling?
     
  5. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

    Reputations:
    7,466
    Messages:
    6,234
    Likes Received:
    6,190
    Trophy Points:
    681
    @THE-HL - From the Intel bible, everything you ever wanted to know about HDC and then some. What I am thinking is that if HDC is enabled and actually working, I think a user should see an increase in package C state residency time. Not something I would use when plugged in but when running on battery power, maybe HDC will help the cause a little.

    14.5 HARDWARE DUTY CYCLING (HDC)
    Intel processors may contain support for Hardware Duty Cycling (HDC), which enables the processor to autonomously force its components inside the physical package into idle state. For example, the processor may selectively force only the processor cores into an idle state.

    HDC is disabled by default on processors that support it. System software can dynamically enable or disable HDC to force one or more components into an idle state or wake up those components previously forced into an idle state. Forced Idling (and waking up) of multiple components in a physical package can be done with one WRMSR to a packaged-scope MSR from any logical processor within the same package.

    HDC does not delay events such as timer expiration, but it may affect the latency of short (less than 1 msec) software threads, e.g. if a thread is forced to idle state just before completion and entering a “natural idle”.

    HDC forced idle operation can be thought of as operating at a lower effective frequency. The effective average frequency computed by software will include the impact of HDC forced idle.

    The primary use of HDC is enable system software to manage low active workloads to increase the package level C6 residency. Additionally, HDC can lower the effective average frequency in case or power or thermal limitation.

    When HDC forces a logical processor, a processor core or a physical package to enter an idle state, its C-State is set to C3 or deeper. The deep “C-states” referred to in this section are processor-specific C-states.
     
    6.|THE|1|BOSS|.9, Vasudev and c69k like this.
  6. f3n1c3

    f3n1c3 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Hello again,

    In my continuing quest to better understand this fantastic software and my own computer, I have some questions/issues after using Throttlestop for a while. I have included images of all my settings and logs for my "maxed-out" profile, for highest possible performance while maintaining reasonable stability. For tasks like video editing, 3D modeling, etc. where I can't risk crashes whatsoever, I use a second profile which is basically the same except not overclocked to 4.3GHz on all cores and the SpeedShift EPP set to 64 instead of 0.

    When I run the TS Bench in this maxed out profile I often get errors, though now and then it runs through and I get those results as shown (which I don't know what they mean actually, [see image]). Also,when running the longest TS Bench setting I can see the "Throttle" radio button go on and off now and then, even though temperatures are staying below 80.

    As you can see, under the "Limits" pane I get those yellow signs (I also don't know what these mean either).

    FIVR
    I'm wondering about that "IccMax" setting. I read that it's OK to set it to the max, though I have it at 175 (max for me is 255) for CPU Core, is this correct? "CPU Cache" IccMax is set to 11.00 (max is also 255). Should these be the same? What about IccMax for GPU, it's currently set at 32?

    My undervolt seems best and most stable at -125mV. I've pushed it to -150mV but my computer becomes unstable at that point.

    Should I check the "Disable and Lock Turbo Limits" setting? Why does it say Install? How would this help or not help?

    Turbo Power Limits

    I still don't understand if I should have Turbo Boost Power Max (and Short) checked or not, whether it should be locked, clamped, or if my numbers (watts?) should be changed. Turbo Time Limit? Any advice or thoughts on these would be appreciated. Again, I'm trying to maintain some semblance of stability with this profile, as I would still like to try and use it for some projects and games.


    In summation, I would like to understand what those errors mean during TS Bench, if and why my computer is throttling when the temperatures don't even seem to pass 80 degrees, and if the settings I am currently using are optimal or if there are issues. Again, this is my "max-performance" profile and I am open to taking a bit of risk for performance. My secondary profile would be max performance with stability as priority for 3D modeling, video/photo editing, etc.

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I appreciate your guys' patience and willingness to help newbies like me. Major props to unclewebb for this software and his patience, thank you.


    Benchmarks:
    Cinebench
    OpenGL: 130.46 fps
    CPU (consecutive tests): 1368, 1339, 1279, 1315, 1339
    Geekbench 4
    CPU: 24652, 24582
    Compute Benchmark (OpenCL): 181682 (CUDA): 188294
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Tofacitinib

    Tofacitinib Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I have run prime95 blend test for half an hour without a problem. I have been using my cpu at -170 mV(core -170.9, cache -170.9) for weeks and never had a problem in games. I've a cinebench r15 score of 1240 which i believe is good enough for a i7 8750H. I will run prime95 small fft too just to make sure.
     
  8. Tomatot

    Tomatot Notebook Guru

    Reputations:
    5
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hi,

    First, thank you for last update. It's always nice to see that you keep updating your software with interesting new features.

    However, I'd like to understand something: I've read that on Windows 10, when you click on the battery icon in the notification tray, changing the power mode actually changes the speedshift settings. So I wonder how it works with ThrottleStop. Which one of them has the priority? Is there a way to block the Windows one so I can stick with my ThrottleStop profiles?

    Thank you for your help. :)
     
  9. YoungStarDC

    YoungStarDC Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Hey everyone,

    I am very new to undervolting and overclocking and I was wondering if someone could help me out using Throttlestop.

    I currently own an Aorus X5 V8 with an i7 8850H. I undervolted the CPU Core and Cache with -100mV. It also has a liquid metal repaste. Right now, I am busy exporting a bunch of edited pictures, which has all cores running at 100% at approximately 3.3Ghz. The temperatures average about 68c, with an ambient temp of 28c and without the fans being close to max speed, which I assume is very decent when running all 6 cores at 100%.

    My question now is, why can't or don't the clocks go higher? My assumption was that all 6 cores should be able to run at 4Ghz at the same time when properly cooled. I based my assumption on this table:

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: according to XTU, which I have now uninstalled as I read here that it can mess with Throttlestop, my laptop is power limit throttling. According to TS, I am using 45W, which is what it's rated for I think. Not sure what to do about it! Can it go past 45w or is there something else I can do?

    [​IMG]

    If you need anymore information or screenshots of specific settings, please let me know! :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2018
  10. Temp1234453

    Temp1234453 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    14
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I noticed a side effect of DTPF (at least with its default BIOS settings).

    The other day I was playing and after a while, the laptop suddenly suspended. Turned it on, and start playing again, and once again, after a while ,it suspended again.
    Then I noticed TS was not running (for some reason, it sometimes happens when I plug/unplug the laptop to external monitor,keyboard and ethernet cable, I think its problem of the task manager actually since HWInfo ,which also have a task for it, also closes)

    So I ran OCCT stress test (with TS on) and when temperatures passed the limit (BD PROCHOT), the laptop suspended. Tried it thrice.
    Then I disabled DTPF on BIOS, and tried the same, this time, instead of suspending, the CPU throttled.
     
Loading...

Share This Page