The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. cktducky

    cktducky Notebook Guru

    Reputations:
    8
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Disabling the turbo to get the no throttling is actually not a solution but nothing you can do for the DELL's good design. DELL & HP... :bigconfused::mad2:
     
    Papusan and raz8020 like this.
  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    3,556
    Messages:
    6,583
    Likes Received:
    4,329
    Trophy Points:
    431
    Sorry it was a typo. Its either 452/35w. Never disable turbo boost. Ask around dell forums for a solution. Try asking @custom90gt if you have issues with XPS laptop thermal issues.
     
  3. LOUSYGREATWALLGM

    LOUSYGREATWALLGM Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    172
    Messages:
    1,066
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Done installing Intel XTU and you're right again, same result Power Limit Throttling :(. Does it mean I'm stuck with this PL throttling?
    I would also like to ask what could be causing it to hit the PL limit since its not the temp?

    upload_2018-8-9_1-52-17.png

    Edit:
    Sorry for the confusion as I forgot to mention the machine I'm testing with is Acer Predator Helios 300

    Tried 56 and beyond. Still nothing
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
    Vasudev likes this.
  4. GreatD

    GreatD Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    27
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    41
    There was a custom modification done by one of the users on this forum.. The VRM's are not covered at all with Thermal pads touching the heatsink. The VRM's are possibly taking to much strain and cant be cooled properly so they overheat and cause the flag. The VRM's and Mosfets have to be cooled properly with Thermal pads such as Arctic or Fujipoly. It was a bad design from Dell's part unfortunately :(
     
  5. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    5,063
    Messages:
    4,341
    Likes Received:
    5,829
    Trophy Points:
    581
    Your CPU is a fully locked down BGA chip. You're limited by force to 45W long term power limit and 56W short term power limit.
    There is no way to avoid this, unless there is a way to access advanced Bios menus, either by hacking or by force, and only then if the options to tweak the power reporting is available.

    The only laptops that can bypass the 45W long term power limit are MSI BGAbooks, only because MSI left the Bios able to be unlocked in several ways (4 finger salute combo, or AMIBCP 5.02 + FPTW64 to dump the Bios--note the AMIBCP+FPTW64 method only works if you can disable "Bios Lock" via a very complicated method involving getting the hex offsets for Bios Lock with UEFITool, and Universal IFR Extractor, then booting to a RU efi prompt (bios lock is NOT the same as bios guard! if you have Bios guard enabled you're..um...done).

    On current MSIbooks and previous eVGAbooks, you can bypass the TDP limits by changing IMON SLOPE and IMON OFFSET. Imon slope less than 100 (100= 1.0x) makes the CPU report a TDP by a percentage factor of the Imon slope, and Imon offset is some scaling value, usually capped at negative (-) 31999, as setting it to 32000 is the same as setting it to 0 for some reason.

    You can make CPU drawing 120W report less than 50W this way.

    The Embedded Controller still has to allow for higher than base TDP to even be allowed; in some MSIbooks that do not have an unlocked CPU SKU available on that Bios (some of their mainboards have both unlocked and locked CPU's on the same mainboard, using the exact same EC and Bios), sometimes even Imon slope=50 and Imon offset=-31999 won't save you. While these tweaks worked for EVERYONE with a MSI GS65 and MSI GP63 and GT75 6 core laptop, someone with an older GE62 said he was TDP throttling even though the CPU reported 10W at full load.
     
    pressing, Vasudev, raz8020 and 2 others like this.
  6. LOUSYGREATWALLGM

    LOUSYGREATWALLGM Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    172
    Messages:
    1,066
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Thank you so much for helping me understand this. :)
     
  7. PredatoR_TR

    PredatoR_TR Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    22
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Hello guys,

    When I open my throttlestop, I see that Analog I/O is set to +125mV, Shall I change it or keep it as it is? Does it have some effect to temperature?
     
  8. GreatD

    GreatD Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    27
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I dont think it's a good idea to increase the voltage for Analog I/O. Normally @unclewebb advises us to not change the default and just undervolt Core and Cache areas only. These two effect the temperature the most. I would personally change Analog I/O to 0 (default) or undervolt it rather than Increase voltage. I have only changed Core and Cache myself. Good luck :)
     
    Vasudev likes this.
  9. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    5,063
    Messages:
    4,341
    Likes Received:
    5,829
    Trophy Points:
    581
    Did you change uncore offset in your bios?
     
  10. PredatoR_TR

    PredatoR_TR Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    22
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    41

    Hello,

    I didnt change anything in my BIOS.

    First I used XTU to find out how much I can undervolt, then changed it to the stock and uninstall it. Then I installed throttlestop and it is what I had. As a stock CPU core and cache were +20, and Analog I/O was +125

    Laptop is Asus G703VI
     
Loading...

Share This Page