The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Try setting the lock bit (Bit[31]) in register FED159A0.

    That means when you write a value to this register, the first digit should be an 8. Once that register is locked, it cannot be changed until you reboot or maybe it will be reset if you do a Sleep / Resume cycle.

    [​IMG]

    If this works you can probably write a small script to get RW Everything to do this for you automatically when you boot up. If this does not work, there is probably one more power limit that you do not have access to that is limiting your CPU. Lots of throttling schemes are available to manufacturers.
     
  2. Kers

    Kers Notebook Consultant

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    Still trying to figure out how to enable C6 or deeper package C state on MSI laptop. Enable/disable C state in the BIOS changes the Package C State Limit. Enable-C10, disable - C1. I guess MSI lock the C State in hidden BIOS options. I'll get unlocked BIOS after warranty expiration.

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    Another interesting finding is that according to the review GS73VR with 4K 1060 7700HQ uses 8.4W less at idle compare to the one with 1080P 1060 6700HQ. Maybe MSI enabled C6 in kaby lake?
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/MSI-GS73VR-7RF-7700HQ-GTX-1060-4K-Laptop-Review.226124.0.html
     
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  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    @Kers - If you ever find where Package C6 is hiding, let me know. It might be a hidden Windows power option that causes this problem. I am curious about one thing. When running on battery power and your computer is idle, does the power consumption data reported by ThrottleStop at the bottom of the screen change any significant amount when you switch from an EPP setting of 255 to an EPP setting of 0? Also keep an eye on the reported Temp data. If the CPU fan speed is consistent, sometimes just watching what happens to the core temperature can give you an indirect indication of CPU power consumption. Less power consumption should show up as lower core temperatures.

    I also noticed a couple of things in your screenshot that I wanted to comment on to help others.

    [​IMG]

    The ThrottleStop Power Saver feature depends on the ThrottleStop Set Multiplier feature to lower the multiplier when lightly loaded. Both of these features depend on SpeedStep being enabled.

    The next thing that users need to understand is that if Speed Shift is enabled, (SST in green), none of the above old school ThrottleStop features will work anymore. Speed Shift takes precedence over any ThrottleStop feature that is SpeedStep related. If you are using Speed Shift, there is no reason to check the Set Multiplier option. It just wastes CPU cycles.
     
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  4. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Do what unclewbb suggested awhile ago and check with the file biosbits, to see if windows is blocking the c6 states or something else.
    Because even with the fully unlocked MSI Bios, you won't go any deeper than C3.
     
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  5. Kers

    Kers Notebook Consultant

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    EPP 255 800MHz 2.3W 40 degrees 0.58v
    EPP 0 3450MHz 3.0W 40 degrees 1v
    MSI does not enable Speed Shift by default and Windows power slider doesn't affect EPP value on my laptop.

    I enabled these options cuz I just wanna try random things to see if it triggers C6. Forgot to disable them when taking the screenshot.
    Gonna check Windows power option now.
     
  6. Kers

    Kers Notebook Consultant

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    Could you please send me a link to unclewebb's post? Not sure what key word to search. Thanks.
     
  7. Kers

    Kers Notebook Consultant

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  8. duttyend

    duttyend Notebook Enthusiast

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    Great news, thank you very much !!!

    Thanks a lot for clarifying those dependencies and their consequences !
     
  9. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    https://biosbits.org/

    You could have searched this yourself. Not to be rude but I'm not here to do searches for you.
     
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  10. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    [​IMG]

    @Kers - The CPU power consumption reported by ThrottleStop and all monitoring software is only an estimate and this estimate is not very accurate when a CPU is idle. This data is calculated internally by the CPU and its only purpose is to control the turbo boost function. People put too much faith in this number.

    The power consumption number in the ThrottleStop battery box is measured and shows power consumption for the entire laptop when running on battery power. I was curious to see if the measured power consumption changes when going from 800 MHz to 3450 MHz. When idle, cores are spending the vast majority of their time in C7 where they are disconnected from the clock so they are sitting at 0 MHz and they are disconnected from the voltage rail so cores in C7 are at 0 volts. Tweaking Windows 10 and working on improving the percentage of time your CPU cores are spending in C7 when idle might save more power and be more productive compared to getting package C6 working. Even a dual core U CPU can have the 2 cores averaging 99% in C7 when Windows 10 is idle.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for posting your powercfg settings. I might get lucky and find something hiding in there.
     
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