The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Thank you. I"ll get on that as soon as I can find something to boot it with. Memtest86 on one flash drive, windows 10 fall abortion's edition on the other :(
     
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  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    @unclewebb Will deeper C states give more battery life, I'm curious to know. On my PC, only C6 is deepest available C states.
    With proper fine tuning, I am able to get only 8-13hrs on 92Wh with Wifi turned on and enabling airplane mode (with ethernet connected), I can only max out 15-16hrs on same battery with 6700HQ with optimus. In theory, will transitioning to C10 give more battery life ?
    Am I asking for too much from Windows 10? BTW, on linux I can very briefly transition to c8/c9/c10 when my package C state is locked to c6.
     
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  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    In theory, the deeper the C State, the lower the power consumption will be. Unfortunately, some Intel CPUs have had problems with the deeper C States. Here are a few examples from the Mobile 4th Generation Specification Update document:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There are other bugs where going into a lower C State actually increased power consumption when it should have decreased. Based on problems like this, I am not surprised that some manufacturers have decided to disable some of the deeper C States.

    Some CPUs can limit what package C States are available depending on whether the iGPU is being used, how many monitors are connected or even what display resolution is being used.

    I cannot remember seeing a ThrottleStop screenshot that shows a CPU in Package C9 or Package C10. I do not think that this is a bug in ThrottleStop. There might be very few devices that are using either of these two C States. Most consumers do not know or care what C States their CPU is using. They only care if their device is stable or not.

    The package C State lock seems to be ignored on some CPUs in some situations. Not sure why.
     
  4. karasahin

    karasahin Notebook Consultant

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    I've noticed that fixing maximum processor state at %99 does not limit turbo boost feature on Windows 10 and Broadwell CPU. It used to work back on Windows 7 and Haswell CPU. I don't know why it works like that now but anyways thanks to Throttlestop I am able now to disable or enable turbo boost with just one click. Thanks again!
     
  5. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    iGPU Performance can be set in the Intel HD Graphics Control Panel. It is the only useful tab in the entire program, in my opinion. More on that later.
    upload_2018-1-24_12-48-41.png

    I have a bug with iGPU performance too. When the graphs power plan is set to Balanced or Maximum Battery life, regardless whether on AC power or battery, the the HD 520 chip locks itself down to 300MHz.

    Maximum Performance never forces the 520 to be at 1000MHz/1050MHz Boost. It still idles at 300MHz, though it does change clock speeds more aggressively.

    I prefer using the Intel HD Graphics on games that don't require high grapcics settings or high performance, since, contrary to popular belief, Intel's HD Graphics are VERY efficient (in terms of Frames per watt) when not running at maximum capacity. In my game, I can get 60FPS with the iGPU using 5W, compared to the dedicated GPU using about 15W.

    Then again, the dedicated graphics is more power hungry but MUCH higher performing when running at full capacity, in terms of frames per watt. Nvidia's 9XX series don't do so well at lower clock speeds. I've measured and my GeForce 945M uses 3-4W when idle.

    Tip: NEVER EVER disable your dedicated graphics card in Device Manager in an attempt to "save power". All this does is force optimus OFF whilst having your iGPU drive the display. The dedicated GPU will be idling doing nothing. This keeps the dedicated graphics card on and wastes power. Enabling the dGPU and hence enabling optimus completely turns the dGPU off. Go figure.

    (Optimus is a feature that turns mobile GeForce GPUs completely off when there is no program running on the GPU AND when there is another iGPU)

    Back to Intel's HD Control Panel being useless, it really is. Custom Resolution is still broken in the control panel and only available through CRU.
    upload_2018-1-24_12-58-32.png
    Obviously an 800x600 resolution running at 25Hz is just too much for my eDP cable... except that I can run at 1080p 60Hz... HAH. This was a feature argued for many years until Dec 2016 when Intel finally released a driver allowing EDID overrides.
     
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  6. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Does this picture really say C10 is working on Linux using Powertop or is it just a bug? c10.png
     
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  7. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hey everyone. So about 4 months ago I started to use throttlestop but I did not like it as I had to use it with Open Hardware Monitor, so I simply deleted both it and Open Hardware Monitor one day. I didnt do much heavy gaming during these months and now when I run demanding games such as The Witcher 3, my laptop BSODs after 3-4 hours of gaming. I think it might be due to the undervolts set when throttlestop was installed previously. I re-downloaded it but it says that the voltage offset is at 0 for all profiles. I understand that this data is stored in the INI file and if the previous INI file was deleted, throttlestop should have no way of knowing if the CPU was previously undervolted or not. So my question is, is the undervolt now what I set it to in throttlestop (currently -80mv) or is it -80mv on top of the previous one (say it was -100mv)? And when I deleted throttlestop previously, did it reset my undervolts, or have they remained the same all this time?
     
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Once you delete ThrottleStop and shut down your computer, your CPU should boot up at its default settings with no voltage adjustments. In Windows 10, hold down the Shift key on the keyboard when you select the "Shut down" menu option in the Start menu to make sure that Windows 10 does a full shut down and not a hybrid shut down.

    The under volt shown in ThrottleStop is what your CPU is seeing. ThrottleStop cannot do an under volt on top of an under volt. The monitoring panel in the top right corner of the FIVR window shows you in real time what the current under volt is. The data you see there is the real under volt and I would trust that info more than I would trust any voltage data seen in XTU.

    Your laptop is doing you a favor. It is telling you to get off your butt. Sitting that long at a computer is slowly killing you. :)

    @Vasudev - Perhaps you have discovered the secret C10 C State, in Linux at least. In Windows you can use RW Everything to read the CPU's Model Specific Registers.

    MSR 0x630 - C8 Counter
    MSR 0x631 - C9 Counter
    MSR 0x632 - C10 Counter

    Those 3 counters are kind of like a stopwatch. The instant a CPU spends any time in one of those C States, those counters will start counting upward at a rate of billions of cycles per second. If you check these registers and only see zeros, that means your CPU has not spent any time in those C States since you pushed the power button on. Find a similar CPU register reading tool in Linux and you can check those registers to see if they are counting up when idle.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2018
  9. Shivi Vats

    Shivi Vats Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for the reply! That clears the doubts in my head about all this. And thanks for keeping this software continuously updated too!

    Well yeah but I did buy a gaming laptop and I expect it to be able to game for 3-4 hours continuously without giving me errors. And also its only on free days that I spend that much time gaming. What I am worried about more is that the laptop is giving me BSOD errors.
     
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  10. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    upload_2018-1-25_10-36-59.png

    Well I'm ecstatic. I just unlocked the PL1 of my i7-6500U to 25W I think. That's the laptop running the AIDA stress test with the iGPU and CPU loaded with 0 undervolt.(dGPU disabled for thermal issues)
    upload_2018-1-25_10-45-12.png
    And here it is running LinX with GPUTest loaded on the iGPU...

    Interesting to note that the Package throttles to 18.6W for about half a minute like this:
    upload_2018-1-25_10-50-9.png

    before finally letting the CPU run at 3.0GHz and the iGPU at 1000MHz.

    I did it my changing the 0xFED15F50 value in Memory from 00000001 to 80000002

    I did it before, but I forgot to add the 8 as the lock bit. Lol the old days. Thank you @unclewebb for your post here: http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/the-throttlestop-guide.531329/page-278


    Now to fix the thermal issues... You may or may not have seen my repasting thread last month... I was really happy with the initial results of Arctic MX-4. Now, I'm not. The thermal performance is worse than stock paste, with the CPU reaching 97C and thermal throttling. I'm waiting on this thermal adhesive and I'm going to mod my laptop and add anoethr heatsink. I'd get IC DIamond but it is too expensive. *Sigh*.



    EDIT:

    Well it throttles down to 15W if I also have the dGPU stressed with 'EDP Other' in red. I guess my motherboard/90W AC ADapter can't handle so much power.

    upload_2018-1-25_11-6-15.png

    And this is the result of disabling the dGPU. The CPU Package power shoots up to about 24W And of course thermal throttling kicks in a few seconds later. I think Acer's heatsink should be able to cope, the exhaust air at the back is only warm, not hot. I think the MX-4 has simply gone bad for some reason. I've repasted in 5+ times in the last month. Initial results are good, but after a few days temperatures rise
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2018
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