The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Reset XTU To default values then *EXIT* it completely.
    Reboot.

    Run throttlestop, downvolt your core and cache, exit throttlestop, then run XTU.

    Does it still say the core and cache are both undervolted?
     
  2. imrazor

    imrazor Notebook Geek

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    So my issue is not a problem with Throttlestop, but rather a query about how it manages to solves an odd problem I'm having. I recently experienced a liquid spill on my laptop. It hit the keyboard and drained out the bottom. The keyboard is dead, but I'm able to boot the laptop with a USB keyboard. However, when I put a sustained load on the CPU temps suddenly spike to 80C+ and the CPU throttles to 800MHz. Checked the fans with Speedfan and they were at 0 RPM. Speedfan was unable to turn them on for more than a couple of seconds.

    However once I opened up throttlestop, set the the multiplier to 30T and checked the "Clock Modulation" option, the CPU ramped up to 3GHz and the fans kicked on. I was then able to play Skyrim for 45 mins uninterrupted, where before it would turn into a slideshow. Once clock modulation was turned on and the fans kicked in, temps stayed at around 50C.

    Anybody know what's going on? As it stands, the only way the laptop is usable is if I manually run Throttlestop after every boot.

    CPU is an i5-2520M (2.5 GHz base clock, 3.0/3.2 turbo) in a Dell Precision M6600.
     
  3. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    pinging @unclewebb
    I wonder if you damaged something with the liquid spill. Might have affected something.
    Did you have this 800 mhz throttle problem before the liquid spill? If not, then clearly something besides the keyboard got damaged by it.
     
  4. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    So Intel has just released their 8th generation Intel Core processors, with the i7-8650U featuring a base clock of merely 1.9GHz, but a boost clock of 4.2GHz

    But here's the thing: Intel has now doubled the number of cores on their ULV chips (Now 4 Cores/8 Threads) but kept the TDP the same. What does this mean? More throttling!!! Yaaaayyyy!!!!

    I won't be buying a new laptop for many years to come, but it is interesting as to how power will be managed.

    I know, I know, clock speed barely matters at all for CPUs nowadays, but the difference between 1.9GHz and 4.2GHz (My skylake CPU can go all the way to 0.4GHz) is huge.

    I wonder how clocks will be managed.

    For me, the difference between base clock speed (2.5GHz) and turbo speed (3.1GHz) is negligible. My CPU either throttles waaay down to 1.8-2.2GHz, or goes full speed at 3.0GHz all cores loaded, depending on whether the iGPU is loaded.

    Maybe the newer CPUs will have some very quick (millisecond?) fluctuations in clock speed, which might wreak havoc on undervolts.
     
  5. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    That was my original conspiracy theory but it seems that Microsoft is blocking any program that tries to load WinRing0 directly.

    @0meg4 - What sort of testing are you doing to determine that the temperatures have not changed when using ThrottleStop compared to when using XTU. Make sure to completely exit XTU when testing ThrottleStop and exit ThrottleStop when testing XTU. Check the Task Manager to make sure XTU is not running at all. Both programs are writing information to the same registers in your CPU so best if these programs are not fighting each other for control.

    For testing I would do something simple like run the TS Bench 1024M. While the benchmark is running, switch ThrottleStop profiles back and forth between a profile with no under volt to a profile with your under volt applied. The monitoring table in the top right corner of the FIVR window should show your changes in voltage. Look for the same offset voltage for core and cache. Post some screenshots of the FIVR window for each test as well as the main screen of ThrottleStop. With a consistent test like the TS Bench, the reported power consumption should also show a change if voltage control is working.

    That's not so bad is it? At least your laptop is still usable. Just add ThrottleStop to the Windows start up sequence using the Task Scheduler and problem solved. Here's a guide how to do that and there is also a link to a guide in the first post of this thread.

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/the-throttlestop-guide.531329/page-514

    I have no idea what but it seems like something has shorted out in your laptop. If you ever dump a drink in a laptop, do not turn it on or turn it off immediately. Pull it apart and dry it out before trying to turn it on. A lot of people turn it on right away just to see if it still works but that is usually a bad idea.
     
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  6. 0meg4

    0meg4 Notebook Geek

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    Yes, it stays undervolted. Recognizes the undervolting done by TS.
    This is strange:
    Setting to -140 with TS, running BF4 on ultra: 90°-97°
    Closing TS, opening XTU, same -140. Runs BF4, same map, same server, same everything --> 75°-89°
    Is this possible?
    This is how my TS interface looks:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Maybe that 139.6 is not the same as 140 on XTU? Does that 0.4 really matters?
     
  7. 0meg4

    0meg4 Notebook Geek

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    Did that, and the undervolting is real.
    I don't know what is wrong with bf4 then, that shows those 97°peaks

    Here are my results using your suggestion:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Your undervolting is definitely working.
    Power consumption lower, vcore lower.
    However in both of your screenshots, you clearly are overheating and triggered #Prochot.

    Have you compared the actual in game framerates in BF4, when doing the undervolt in TS, vs the undervolt in XTU?
    The only way to do this properly is to go on an empty single player or custom map and find a place where you can stand at the same spot and get a consistent repeatable FPS. Then test that same spot with XTU after testing it with throttlestop. If TS undervolt is giving you higher FPS than XTU undervolt, then it means XTU is throttling your CPU for some reason.

    One thing to remember is your CPU has an absolute 45W power limit. You also need to tackle those temps. a 7700HQ should not be reaching prochot. Check the fan speeds, or also consider a repaste with Grizzly Kryonaut or Phobya Nanogrease Extreme to deal with those thermals.
     
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  9. imrazor

    imrazor Notebook Geek

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    Well, it's not a big deal if I want to run Windows, but Linux is also glacial and I don't know of a comparable tool that runs under the other OS.

    I found the laptop shut down with a small pool of water underneath it. I have no idea if it shut itself off after it got flooded, or if it was already off. My cat probably knocked the glass of water over onto the keyboard. In any event, I left it off for a couple of days before trying to power it up.
     
  10. 0meg4

    0meg4 Notebook Geek

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    Yeah, did it, and XTU always showed a little lower temps.
    I already orderer Grizzly Kyronaut. Will arrive in a few weeks and gonna do repaste.

    Two things i like to ask, that i don't really know.

    1) Is Prime95 the best benchmarking tool? Because no matter what i do, prime95 always pushes the CPU 95°+. When i used TS Stress Test, it did show "100% CPU usage" but the temps were lower than Prime95 using 100% aswell.

    2) While stressing, the temps always stayed somewhat "stable" between 80-85.. and suddenly it pumps 10° to 95-97 for a second, then come back to the usual 80's.
    Is this normal? Is this the expected undervolting result?
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
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