The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. pressing

    pressing Notebook Deity

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    Thanks D2. Really appreciate your insight.

    My guess is that Dell never intended such huge wattage increases in an i5 running in such a thin laptop. The 9550 thermals were so poorly designed and assembled that this watt mod has a good probability of killing a few laptops. With a good repaste, refitting of VRAM pads, and a good undervolt via ThrottleStop, thermals were quite good in stress tests.

    I'm not sure long power will go anywhere near 96 seconds but will give it a test. Regardless...

    Finally an error by Dell and Intel in the right direction!
     
  2. D2 Ultima

    D2 Ultima Livestreaming Master

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    No problem, hope it got sorted for you.
     
    pressing likes this.
  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Time for some Speed Shift testing on a Kaby Lake Core i5-7600. This is a locked CPU so the maximum multiplier is limited based on how many cores are active. When a single core is active, it should be using the 41 multiplier.

    [​IMG]

    I was interested in seeing a comparison between the old school Windows High Performance and Balanced power profiles vs controlling the CPU speed using the new Skylake and Kaby Lake Speed Shift feature. The first test shows how the CPU performs when it is in the Windows 7 High Performance power profile with Speed Shift disabled.

    [​IMG]

    When a single core is active running the TS Bench test, the CPU is able to get as close as possible to the theoretical maximum 41 multiplier. This setting also results in a high reported multiplier when the CPU is lightly loaded or idle.

    When switching to the traditional Windows Balanced power profile, the multiplier drops down close to 8 when the CPU is idle but is able to reach the same maximum multiplier when required.

    [​IMG]

    Time to enable Speed Shift. An Energy Performance Preference (EPP) setting of 0 should result in maximum performance and the CPU should behave very similar to the old Windows High Performance profile. When the bios enables Speed Shift, Windows 10 sets EPP to 0 when using the High Performance profile. No surprises here with the CPU once again performing at its maximum speed.

    [​IMG]

    The Intel recommended default setting for EPP is 128. When using the Windows 10 Balanced profile, if Speed Shift is enabled, it sets EPP to 127 or 128. One would think that this should provide CPU performance similar to the old Balanced power profile. Sure it drops the multiplier close to 8 when lightly loaded but look what happens when maximum performance is needed.

    [​IMG]

    Instead of the full 41 multiplier, the new Balanced profile limits the CPU to the 37 multiplier. This is probably why knowledgeable enthusiasts were not impressed when Microsoft decided to enable Speed Shift with an automatic Windows 10 update. Less informed consumers now have a slower computer thanks to Intel and Microsoft. Nice.

    The good news is that a knowledgeable ThrottleStop user can adjust the default EPP setting so they can achieve maximum performance similar to the traditional Windows Balanced profile while still being able to take advantage of Speed Shift's ability to get the CPU up to full speed quicker. I decided to drop the default 128 EPP setting down in steps of 16 until I reached 80.

    On this CPU, an EPP setting of 80 achieves what I would want to see in a power saving feature. Low multi at idle and a quick transition to maximum performance when needed.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. AndiiiHD

    AndiiiHD Notebook Consultant

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    thanks a lot @unclewebb maybe this is the reason why its disabled in Bios level on some Gaming Notebooks like my Clevo....
     
  5. illuzn

    illuzn Notebook Consultant

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  6. todda7

    todda7 Notebook Enthusiast

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    @unclewebb I am in the need of switching to Linux but unfortunately there's no ThrottleStop there. With your MSRFinder tool I think I'll be able to find the voltage offset registers and use some Linux tool to set the offsets by hand. Do you know how offset voltages are encoded in the MSR? I tried to convert from hex to decimal then dividing by 2^13 but no luck; either my math is off or I got the wrong register.

    Thanks alot
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  7. DeXa

    DeXa Notebook Enthusiast

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    A little update. Two days ago I updated the BIOS (Lenovo T460s - i7-6600U) and the GPU undervolt stopped working. Now I have to change System Agent as well in order for it to work.
     
  8. dreassica

    dreassica Notebook Guru

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    Got a MSI laptop with a 7700HQ and cant get it to go as high as the claimed turbo speeds of 3800, even if i set the multiplier to 38 T and set it to 38 for 1-4 core active in FIVR, it never goes above 3390mhz regardless of the amount of threads I set it to in the built-in TS bench.
     
  9. Spartan

    Spartan Super Tweaker

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    can you go to your BIOS and increase the power limits from the stock 200 to 300?

    I think there are 2 values, change both
     
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  10. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    @dreassica - If it is maxing out at the 34 multiplier while running the 1 thread TS Bench test then almost guaranteed that you have disabled your C States. These CPUs need at least C3, C6 or C7 to be enabled. On locked CPUs, unused cores need to go into one of these C states so the remaining active core can use the highest multiplier. As always, if you have a question, post a picture or two of ThrottleStop. It makes it a lot easier to troubleshoot.

    @todda7 - Voltage adjustment is kind of complicated. I will not be posting or sharing any information about this subject. I don't want to make any more enemies at Intel. :)

    @DeXa - I was playing with a Kaby Lake and for voltage offset to work, the CPU Cache also has to be adjusted. I used to believe that these had to be adjusted equally but it looks like the Cache Voltage can be adjusted to the same value or a greater value compared to the CPU Core voltage. If the core is set to -100 mV then the Cache voltage has to be at least -100 mV too but it can be undervolted further to -150 mV or whatever. CPU Cache seems to work independently so I can set only that and this will work fine. I will have to play with the Intel GPU to see how that one works. I haven't quite figured out the exact relationship between all of the individual voltages. The bios update likely contained a new microcode that fixed a bug or two within your CPU. The FIVR window shows what microcode version the CPU is using. If you had any old screenshots you could compare.
     
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