The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    Second (more interesting set of data):

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  2. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    In your first set of pictures, when you are using the default TDP/TDC, you are not getting full turbo boost when fully loaded. Nothing odd about that. When you reach the TDP/TDC limit, turbo boost gets turned off. When you are back under the turbo TDP/TDC limit, turbo boost gets turned back on. It will rapidly cycle back and forth like this with the multiplier jumping back and forth between 16 and 18. ThrottleStop shows a very accurate average of about 17 which means the CPU is spending about half of its time at 16 and the other half at 18.

    In your second set of pics, you unchecked the Set Multiplier feature. When you do this, the CPU can be left in an unknown state where the multiplier might get locked at a random value. It looks like it got locked at 5. Turn Set Multiplier back on and it should fix that.

    I need to have a look at how the ThrottleStop Disable Turbo feature works. There are a couple of different ways to disable the turbo feature in an Intel CPU so the button on your laptop that does this might be confusing ThrottleStop.

    If you have any specific questions just ask. Sometimes its hard for me to look through a handful of screen shots and see the same things that you are seeing. The things that make sense to me might not make any sense to you and vice versa.

    Windows 7 drops the average multiplier down on these Core i CPUs at idle no matter how you have them set up.
     
  3. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    Confirmed! It turned out exactly as you said. :)

    I am unable to increase the multiplier in TStop. Is there a way you can unlock it or does that depend solely on the internal programming of the CPU?

    From your advice, I figured out the following:
    1. The gaming mode button's action can be overriden by TStop but this seems a bit of hit and miss. The gaming mode button controls other things such as GPU clocks (can be overriden with AMD GPU Clock tool), Wlan power, screen brightness and HDD power savings. All of this can be overriden by changing W7 performance profiles.
    2. The max overclock you can get with this CPU is simply the highest multiplier = 18 times the FSB clock set in SetFSB. So the only viable option is to crank up the FSB.
    3. CPUz is reports incomplete data when TStop is disabled. The multiplier of 20 reported there is probably wrong. I never see 20x in TStop. TStop does say that a multi of 20x is used if 1 core is inactive. Perhaps CPUz is just reading this number? I have never seen TStop report this number even if affinity is set to one core.
     
  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Your CPU has a locked multiplier. You need an Extreme CPU like a 920XM or 940XM for an unlocked turbo multiplier.

    Your CPU has a default multiplier of 16. A ThrottleStop Set Multiplier setting of 1 more than the default multiplier tells the CPU to use full turbo boost. The CPU then checks to see how many cores are in the active state and whether you are over or under the turbo TDP/TDC limits before deciding how much turbo boost it thinks you deserve. Any multiplier above the default value of 16 is because of turbo boost. There is no way to set a multiplier of 17 or 18 or 19 or 20.

    I'll try to make the next version of ThrottleStop less hit and miss when trying to keep the Disable Turbo option turned off. I didn't realize any laptops were doing this with a magic button.

    2) That's correct. That's why a real Core i5 with a higher multiplier would have been better. You can only get the BCLK up so high even though these CPUs could overclock a lot higher if the multiplier was infinitely adjustable.

    The programmer of CPU-Z and I had a discussion recently and here's what he had to say.

    He has decided for CPU-Z to report a high multiplier at idle so CPU-Z Validations are consistent. My opinion is that this value does not accurately represent what the CPU is doing internally at idle. ThrottleStop follows the Intel recommended method as outlined in their November 2008 Turbo White Paper.

    I also disagree with the data that TMonitor displays. The data is fine as long as you realize that it does not represent the physical multiplier that the CPU is using. TMonitor is more of a load factored multiplier.

    Here is what TMonitor shows for my T8100 that I disagree with.

    XtremeSystems Forums

    There is also an example from a desktop Core i7 in this discussion on XtremeSystems.

    I'm not out to slag the competition but if someone asks, I just like to let them know that I am following the manufacturers recommendations for reporting these CPUs so users can trust the data that ThrottleStop is displaying.

    At idle, there are hundreds of background tasks constantly waking up each core so you will never see the full 20 multiplier for more than a few milliseconds. As soon as a second core wakes up, the maximum immediately drops to 18. An average of 19.70 during a 1 second sampling interval confirms that your CPU is using the 20 multiplier during that monitoring period. There is no way to keep that second core from waking up and reducing the average multiplier during any 1 second interval so you won't see the full 20.0. You might be able to turn on the Log File option and the More Data option and see in the log a value a little closer to 20.0 but there's no real point to do that test. Only if you're curious.

    If you use msconfig and click on the Boot tab and go into the Advanced Options, it might be possible to disable one of your cores. This is the only way to keep that second core from waking up. If you can do that, then you should be able to see ThrottleStop report the full 20 multiplier.
     
  5. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    Copy that. Still digesting the information. I will probably be a beached whale today, stuffed with food. Will report tomorrow after I wake up from the food induced coma. :)
     
  6. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    No need to comment while under the influence of turkey. I understand. :)

    I've received some feedback about the new version of ThrottleStop I've been working on and everything seems OK so far. I'm going to post a link to it so if anyone is interested in doing some early beta testing then they can have at it. Everyone needs something new to play with on a day off.

    ThrottleStop 2.90 beta 2

    http://www.mediafire.com/?4i4fpydfn19xw2b
     
  7. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    It works very well, as as you said, is quite efficient. Stupid Windows died on me before I could quantify efficiency and the ability to append SetFSB to a Profile.

    I have reinstalled Windows and gone through the painful process of installing other stuff. I will hold off testing till my Optical drive caddy arrives. Once that gets here, I will clone this drive and then proceed to annihilate Windows in peace. :D
     
  8. ahl395

    ahl395 Ahlball

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    I have a problem in ThrottleStop...

    It is reporting my CPU temperature 5 degrees hotter than it really is. Is there any way to fix this?

    Also, is it possible to make more than 4 profiles?

    Another question... in options i see something that says Dual IDA on start. Now, i looked at your guide to enable Dual IDA and unfortunetly my BIOS wont allow it. So then, what does this option do? will it make it work anyway?

    Thanks :)
     
  9. lidowxx

    lidowxx Notebook Deity

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    Might have something to do with the TJMAX value, happened to my p8400 too, usually what throttlestop reports is CORRECT, what you see in Hwmonitor might be wrong due to incorrect TJMAX value set in the "ini" file. What is your CPU?

    If you see the "EIST" option is grayed out, then unfortunately you can't enable IDA, there is nothing you can do. Only some Dell notebooks have the BIOS option to turn it on and off.
     
  10. ahl395

    ahl395 Ahlball

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    Its a Core 2 Duo T9300.
    Oh, im suprised. Ive always trusted HWMonitor for temps lol.

    The EIST is greyed out, but it is checked on.

    Also, according to CPU-Z, the CPU Voltage isnt going down to what i set it at, in ThrottleStop.
     
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