The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    The default multiplier for this CPU is 16. When you use Set Affinity and put the load on 1 thread of 1 core, you should be getting some turbo boost but you're not getting any. The FID column in ThrottleStop shows each thread running at a 16 multiplier.

    Instead of 4 threads of Prime95, try just 1 thread and lock it to 1 thread of the CPU with Set Affinity again. I don't think it will make any difference. A retail Core i5 would be giving you maximum turbo boost during this test. The multiplier that CPU-Z shows you at idle is meaningless. Does ThrottleStop ever show a multiplier higher than 16?

    A retail Core i5-430M should be using the 19 turbo multiplier during the above test so at the default BCLK of 133, it would be running at 2527 MHz.

    I just noticed. ThrottleStop has Disable Turbo checked so turbo boost is turned off. If you click on this and it stays checked, that means that your CPU has turbo boost permanently turned off so the maximum multiplier that it can run at is the default multiplier which is only 16. :(

    A Core i3-330M has the turbo boost feature locked / disabled and runs at a default multiplier of 16. That's why I thought you had one of them.

    Edit: When you post a picture from ImageShack, can you use the forum thumb nail feature. The mods appreciate that.
     
  2. JKleiss

    JKleiss Notebook Evangelist

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    Looks like an i3 330M with turbo activated maybe
     
  3. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    You know what...I am an idiot. In those previous screens I was merely using TStop in monitoring mode. FID goes to 19 and above when I did what you suggested. Now what do you think?

    [​IMG]

    Edit* Forum is not allowing me to give rep points to unclewebb. This is silly. I have learned something new from every post he has made and I am not allowed to thank him? Not nice. :(

    Edit#2:
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    Is there any way to bump up the VCore? Any other software tool to do it?
     
  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    With early ES processors, sometimes Intel leaves some features locked or unlocked for testing purposes. At the moment, I would have to agree with JKleiss that your CPU is likely a Core i3-330M with turbo boost activated. All of the retail Core i3 CPUs have the turbo boost feature permanently disabled.

    If someone has a Core i3 or Core i5, can you post a Turbo Ratio Limits screen shot like this so we can compare?

    [​IMG]

    Based on this, the multiplier your CPU is using makes sense. When 1 core is active and the second core is in the C3/C6 sleep state, it can use the 20 multiplier. When 2 cores are active, it can use a maximum multiplier of 18 as long as you are not exceeding the turbo TDP/TDC power limits.

    Windows has hundreds of background tasks that need to wake up the second core on a regular basis. When you are running Prime95 on one core, that core is active so you will be able to use the 20 multiplier. As soon as a background task needs to be processed, that forces the second core to wake up and the maximum multiplier will immediately drop down to 18 for both cores. When that task is taken care of, the second core goes back to sleep and the multiplier for the core doing the work will go back up to 20. This multiplier transitioning back and forth is happening inside the CPU hundreds of times a second which is why Intel recommends that software should report the average multiplier. That's what ThrottleStop is showing you.

    A multiplier value of 19.70 looks a little odd but keep in mind that is an average multiplier. When you decode this number you get something like this:

    (20.0 x 85%) + (18.0 x 15%) = 19.70

    During your test, the CPU is able to use the full 20 multiplier about 85% of the time and the second core is awake about 15% of the time. When that happens, the multiplier drops down to 18.0. I think you can see that reducing the number of background processes on these CPUs will help to keep that second core asleep and will maximize your average multiplier.

    When you run all 4 threads at 100% C0% usage, are you seeing the full 18.00 multiplier on each thread or less than that? If the multiplier is throttling between 16 and 18 when fully loaded, that means that you are hitting the turbo TDP/TDC limit. If you can increase this limit then you should be able to maintain the full 18 multiplier even when fully loaded.

    Unfortunately, Intel has not documented any way to increase core voltage through software like you could do in the Core 2 design. I think there are some desktop motherboards with some motherboard specific software that lets you adjust Core i voltage from within Windows but there is no general software that lets you do this on a laptop.

    No problem with the lack of rep points.
     
  5. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    I will test this and report later tonight.

    A quick question: Can I bump up the Turbo TDP/TDC by say doubling it from stock value and ensure throttling is held back? Basically, I want all my benches to run whilst the CPU is at its max core clocks on all cores.
     
  6. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Some of the M11x R2 users with UM processors have set the turbo TDP/TDC values sky high to 100/100 or 200/200 to make sure this doesn't interfere with maximum turbo boost. A TDP of about 30 is usually adequate to maintain full turbo boost in one of these CPUs but 100/100 won't hurt anything. It won't suddenly feed your CPU with 100 watts and 100 amps. The CPU will only draw as much power as it needs.

    During full load testing, as the CPU heats up, the processors resistance changes and its power consumption will go up a little. That's a good reason not to use a bare minimum turbo TDP/TDC setting. Using a big, unobtainable TDP/TDC number will insure the maximum turbo boost, all the time.

    The best thing to do is to play around with this setting while you are running 4 threads of Prime95 and keep an eye on the average multiplier. With TDP presently set to 25, you might be very close to getting full turbo boost already which would be the 18 multiplier when both cores are active. If you decrease TDP, you can convert your CPU to a low power UM CPU. The Core i5/i7 UM series in the M11x R2 uses default TDP/TDC settings of 10/30 which kills full load turbo boost but might increase battery life a little.

    The M11x R2 continuously tries to reset the TDP/TDC values back to default. In the ThrottleStop options window is a value called Force TDP/TDC. This controls the frequency that these values are updated by ThrottleStop. The M11x obtains maximum CPU performance when this is down at about 8. The M15x and M17x don't seem to need this value constantly monitored and refreshed so a higher value like 1000 for Force TDP/TDC is OK.

    If you run a longer Prime95 test, just enable the ThrottleStop Log File feature so you can go back and make sure that you are maintaining the full 18.00 multiplier.
     
  7. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    Copy that. Thank you for the detailed information. I will definitely post my findings based on your suggestions.
     
  8. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    I set the TDP/TDC to 100/100. Now, when I run Prime, the FID stays steady at 18.0. No fluctuations whatsoever.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    With your default TDP/TDC settings of 25/21, what multiplier does ThrottleStop show during that test? Just curious to see how much of a difference TS makes on this CPU. Probably not too much.

    With full turbo boost at full load, a Core i5-430M can use a maximum turbo multiplier of 19. You're a notch below that but at least turbo boost isn't locked on your CPU like it is on the retail Core i3 CPUs.

    Were you using SetFSB before? When you right click on ThrottleStop and use the Update BCLK option, does it report your correct bus speed after using SetFSB?

    The next version of ThrottleStop lets you enter SetFSB command line parameters directly into ThrottleStop so when you switch profiles you can set it up to automatically run SetFSB in the background at the same time. If you want to check out this new feature, send me a PM and I'll send you a beta version. It's almost ready for prime time.
     
  10. Septimus_DSX

    Septimus_DSX Notebook Consultant

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    Some really weird stuff is going on when SetFSB, TStop and the built in "Gaming Mode" touch button interact with the CPU.

    The Gaming mode button seems to be a hardware feature that enables or disables Turbo.

    Take a look at the first set of screens:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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