The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Even after 10 years, I am usually good for a few suggestions. :)

    1) You have the long turbo power limit (PL1) set to 56W in ThrottleStop. Your log file shows your CPU PL1 throttling at 56W so your CPU is doing what you are telling it to do. When you set the long turbo power limit higher in ThrottleStop, can you get beyond 56W long term? Some Dell laptops will set a hard power limit. If this is the case, you will not be able to use ThrottleStop to get beyond a hard limit that Dell has set.

    I disagree with Brad's Hacks suggestion to disable the short power limit check box. This might work on his CPU but this trick might not work on all CPUs. I prefer to leave both power limits checked with the power limit values set appropriately. I know this works. His method might work too. I have not tested a wide enough range of CPUs and motherboards to make sure that his method always works.

    2) A 5°C difference between fully loaded cores is normal. These temperature sensors are not 100% accurate temperature monitoring devices. Even if your paste job was perfect, there is still some slight differences from core to core because of temperature sensor accuracy. These are not space shuttle calibre sensors. They do not have to be. Intel only used to rate their sensors to +/- 5°C so you are well within that spec.

    3) Using liquid metal might help you achieve a tiny bit more performance but the 56W PL1 power limit is still going to kick in when fully loaded. Hardly worth bothering.

    4) Your CPU already has the thermal throttling temperature set to 100°C which Intel lists as the maximum safe temperature. You cannot use ThrottleStop to go beyond 100°C and I would not recommend trying to do this even if you could. Some desktop boards have BIOS options for some Intel CPUs so you can get beyond the 100°C barrier. Not sure if any laptops have this option.

    5) If you open up Limit Reasons, it should show you when throttling is voltage regulator related. Your log file only shows CPU thermal throttling and then PL1 power limit throttling kicks in soon after that.

    @golovkin - Setting LockPowerLimits to 1 just makes sure that FED15990 is set to 0xFF so this register does not limit the maximum multiplier. If your computer is already set to 0xFF then there is no reason to use this ThrottleStop INI option.

    Your CPU supports overclocking but you need both an overclockable CPU combined with a chipset that supports overclocking. I do not believe the H61 chipset supports overclocking. ThrottleStop shows that your CPU supports +4 bins of overclocking but the turbo ratio limit adjusters in ThrottleStop are all locked to their default values. They are probably locked because the chipset does not support overclocking.

    Error Creating Service error you get in ThrottleStop happens when you are trying to run ThrottleStop and RWEverything at the same time. There is a conflict because they are both trying to access the same RwDrv driver. ThrottleStop 9.0 uses a new driver so you should be able to use it and RWEverything at the same time without any problems.

    @pete962 - Perhaps a BIOS update changed how your CPU handles voltage requests. It is impossible to say what happened. The original Plundervolt fix disabled CPU voltage control while in Windows. Maybe Intel got enough negative feedback that they found a way to be Plundervolt compliant and still allow users to adjust their CPU voltage while in Windows. There was lots of doom and gloom last December when the original Plundervolt fix was released. Voltage control is still working OK for most users, including on Intel's 10th Gen mobile CPUs.

    Almost forgot. Try setting the CPU offset voltage to a much bigger number compared to the cache offset voltage. These do not have to be set equal. You might gain some Cinebench points for your troubles. The 8750H and 9750H are often times stable even when the core voltage is up around -200 mV.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  2. WigsterR

    WigsterR Newbie

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    @unclewebb Huge thanks for the detailed response!

    None of the power limit settings inside of Throttlestop seem to do anything. Even though the PL1 is set higher than 56W, after 28 seconds the 56W limit is being enforced. I even went through the trouble of trying to set the levels with Intel XTU, even though that probably works the same way as TS. Alas, no dice. The only way a user has any control over the power limits is through Dell's own Power Manager, it seems. The Ultra Performance profile in Dell Power Manager sets the PL2 and 1 at 107W, and 56W respectively, while the Cool, and Quiet profiles set PL2 and 1 at 37W, and 17W respectively. I guess this is a dead end then.

    I also looked at Throttling while both the CPU and GPU were under load. This was while playing a game for a couple of minutes. Even though the PL1 is never reached, it still occasionally hits the thermal limit. I'm guessing that's because the cooling system has the extra heat of the GPU to deal with on top of the CPU heat.

    A part of me still wants to try out the liquid metal, even though the risk probably far outweighs the reward :D. For 100% CPU load it may just help thermals a bit for 28 seconds before PL1 throttling kicks in, but I'm thinking it might improve the thermal performance when both the CPU and GPU are under load. I'll do some further testing to see when I actually encounter throttling during real world use, which is video editing, and animation.

    I've tried increasing the CPU offset voltage in a 2:1 fashion, and that does help a bit!

    Again, thanks for the help.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020 at 5:41 AM
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  3. miloaisdua

    miloaisdua Notebook Enthusiast

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    Could you try with dell power manager uninstalled?
     
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  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    ThrottleStop 9.1
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ve03GyMmRv45od3pjr4K0btqboCovp5z/view?usp=sharing

    New Features
    - updated TS Bench test with random MHz option.
    - fixed BCLK MHz reporting when using Core Isolation.
    - added support for devices that use connected standby.
    - added reporting of suspend / resume times to the log file.
    - removed auto BCLK updates when resuming.
    - fixed GDI handle leak.
    - new color and font options.
    - new black notification area icon option.
    - new option to remove the title bar.
    - removed PROCHOT indicator box.
     
  5. WigsterR

    WigsterR Newbie

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    Good call! Unfortunately uninstalling didn't help, though :(. Appreciate the advice!
     
  6. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    @WigsterR, did you also reboot afterward? :D
     
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  7. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Got a startup failed thingy with v9.1:

    [​IMG]

    Version on my installation (Windows 7):

    [​IMG]

    Microsoft's help page:
    RegisterSuspendResumeNotification function

    So ... guess it needs Windows 8+ for this particular option?
     
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    I knew the Register Suspend Resume Notification function was not Window 7 compatible. I found some code on the internet so TS 9.1 was supposed to check for compatibility before trying to run that function. I will have to come up with a plan B for Windows 7 users. I will send you a beta when it is ready if you would like to do some Windows 7 testing for me.

    Once I get the above bug fixed, the suspend / resume times should show up in the log file when using Windows 7.

    Thanks for the bug report.
     
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  9. Jdpurvis

    Jdpurvis Notebook Evangelist

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    Thanks UncleWebb, for all your good work! TS has consistently helped me get more use out of laptops that had inadequate cooling - from my first experience with Alienware m15x (big time throttling!) to my current Gigabyte, to my wife's Lenovo Extreme V2. And your patient responses to all of us have set an example to all. BTW, 9.1 fixed the font issue I was having - since it occurred on machines with 4k screens with scaling set, I think it was a scaling problem.
    Have a great weekend!
     
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  10. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    The simple MFC programming tools that ThrottleStop uses are rooted in the Windows 95 era. Windows scaling on these old school apps is horrible. Glad to hear that the new font options are making things a little less blurry for you.
     
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