The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. pressing

    pressing Notebook Deity

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    I get -160 easy on my Dell 9550 6300HQ. If you look on the XPS forums here you can see averages for that laptop which very stable probably range -130 to -160. Nobody was stable past -170 and older CPUs might require less aggressive undervolts.

    Also repaste as your CPU is old now.
     
  2. djdelarosa25

    djdelarosa25 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Do you guys stick core and cache values?
     
  3. djdelarosa25

    djdelarosa25 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Okay so I'm confused. Some say to UV the core more than the cache, some say the opposite, while others say they should be set equally. Even @unclewebb himself provides contradicting statements regarding this.
     
  4. pressing

    pressing Notebook Deity

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    Some CPUs will ignore undervolt if core and cache don't match. You can test that pretty easily with a benchmark. I tested my 6300hq but don't remember the results lol. I run core & cache at -160mv.

    Also, I do not undervolt the Intel GPU. It was causing some DPC latency issues which are important to my live audio work.
     
  5. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    That is true. The problem is that I do not own or have access to a wide range of recent CPUs. No 8th, 9th or 10th Gen hardware for me. I have a 7th Gen desktop and a 4th Gen laptop. I have never been able to do any thorough testing of what voltage settings work best for what family of CPUs. An 8th Gen desktop CPU might work one way and a similar 8750H might work differently. An 8th Gen U CPU might work some other way. That is why there are so many conflicting opinions.

    Here is my official advice. Start by setting both the CPU core and CPU cache offset voltages equally. This always works on every CPU. Once you start to get a feel for where your CPU is stable, try adjusting the CPU core to a bigger undervolt number compared to what you have the CPU cache offset to. On the 8750H and 9750H, some users are 100% certain that this gives improved overall temperatures and performance. Without access to hardware, I cannot argue for or against doing this.

    if -125 mV is stable for the core and cache offsets, keep the cache at -125 mV and increase the core offset number. Try -150 mV for the core or -200 mV, etc. At some point, you might find that going beyond that point provides zero benefit. I have seen people using -1000 mV for the core. Their CPU is still stable so obviously the CPU is ignoring this setting.

    I do not ever remember anyone using a CPU core value numerically lower than the cache value. If -100 mV for the cache is OK, setting the core to -75 mV I think will result in both using the lowest value of -75 mV.

    Many people watch YouTube videos and then blindly follow the herd. I always recommend doing some thorough testing on your own computer. Whatever settings you decide to use, make sure that you can prove that those settings actually work. Think of the voltage adjusters in ThrottleStop as merely requests. The CPU can decide to ignore any or all of the voltage request if it does not understand your request. That might be why Intel XTU decided to force the core and cache offsets to equal values. It just keeps thing simple.

    Start with offsets equal, run a benchmark or two, set core more than cache and test again. To confirm, you need to go back to your original settings to make sure nothing has changed. Laptop testing can be a challenge. As temperatures and fan speeds change, it can be very difficult to keep every variable consistent. That is why lots of testing is important. Performance can also change significantly when running benchmark tests back to back. The amount of turbo boost available to the CPU can be significantly reduced after the first benchmark run. If you make a change to your voltage settings and immediately do another benchmark test, you might not end up with a meaningful comparison.
     
  6. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Please post affected models in the thread above. It will be updated with confirmed models continuously as they being posted http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...-win-update-bios.831450/page-10#post-10999828
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
  7. djdelarosa25

    djdelarosa25 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I spent the whole day testing and playing around with different voltages and found that setting the core to undervolt more than the cache has no noteworthy difference in terms of temperatures and performance versus setting them to undervolt equally in my 6300U. Even then, I can only manage about -110mV on core while keeping the cache at -100mV before BSODing so it's not even that big of a variance. Might as well just stick to -100mV on both.

    Heck, I don't think undervolting the iGPU is even worth it. It's much harder to verify stability and it, at least in my case, did nothing in lowering temps.

    As always, thank you for your insights. I love how passionately you try to answer every single one of our inquiries even though you're probably sick of reading them over and over again. Cheers to you @unclewebb and keep safe!
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2020
  8. yahyoh

    yahyoh Notebook Enthusiast

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    Damn Intel/Acer seems blocked UV recently, now its stuck with factory -125Mv on my Helios 300 2019 :mad:

    Not even XTU doing anything.

    Good Job Intel. ughhhhh
     
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  9. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Rename the microcode update file in system32 and test again, most likelly its only the Windows doing the microcode update, unless you updated the BIOS recently..
     
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  10. yahyoh

    yahyoh Notebook Enthusiast

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    You are the man, it worked...mostly, but to apply UV now i have to reboot lol. I might try to downgrade the bios, as i tried to downgrade before changing the mcupdate_GenuineIntel.dll it didnt work i might try again tomorrow to see if i will be able to change voltage on the fly.
     
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