The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Just read some interesting info about a new bug with Intel's SGX extensions. Hacking software that adjusts the voltages up and down can create some serious security problems. Intel's solution was to come out with a microcode update that disables CPU voltage adjustments. If you like using ThrottleStop or Intel XTU, you better watch out for that update.

    https://arstechnica.com/information...weaking-cpu-voltage/?comments=1&post=38386251

    @MikeNZ - If you are having problems with ThrottleStop, I need to see exactly how you have ThrottleStop setup. Show me an example of your CPU stuck at 1800 MHz with the Limit Reasons open so I can see what is holding you back. Show me your TPL and FIVR settings. Are you plugged in? Where do you have ThrottleStop located? Did you move it from one folder to another folder after you first ran it? If you did that, try removing the ThrottleStop.INI configuration file so ThrottleStop can create a new one. Make sure you only have 1 instance of ThrottleStop.exe and you are running it from the same hard drive location when double clicking on it or when starting it with the Task Scheduler.

    And of course, you followed the ThrottleStop Task Scheduler Guide exactly. :)
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/the-throttlestop-guide.531329/#post-6865107
     
  2. onrblbl

    onrblbl Notebook Guru

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    @unclewebb - Well I thought it would be better to continue from here maybe people can get some more information.
    I put some picture they were after i've disabled C States with that command you gave earlier.
    C State.jpg

    TS Bench.jpg
    But I did not understand why it was showing 3.70 Ghz in Task Manager.
    Task Maneger 3.70 Ghz.jpg
     
  3. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    New Plundervolt attack impacts Intel CPUs zdnet.com | Dec 11, 2019

    WHAT'S IMPACTED AND WHERE TO GET FIXES
    Microcode and BIOS updates were released today as part of security advisory INTEL-SA-00289. These updates give administrators a new BIOS option to disable the volting and frequency control interface on their systems.

    Plundervolt is nothing that end-users should worry about. It's an attack vector that is of little interest for malware authors since it's hard to automate at scale.

    I wouldn't lose äny sleep over this... If your prefered Notebook manufacturer don't let you get the proper choices with future bios update. Then, don't buy anything from them in the future.

    According to updated information provided by Intel, Intel is “working with system manufacturers to provide a balance between performance and security for platforms that support “overclocking of unlocked processors,”

    “We expect limited overlap between use cases where Intel SGX and overclocking are both relevant,” the representative added, however, probably meaning that there’s little chance that the average PC user will be affected. In the case that the mitigation is applied, however, Intel’s XTU tuning utility will not allow voltage changes from the default.

    Does your motherboard support SGX? It’s likely most recent boards do, though it’s not clear whether the feature is on by default.
    Protecting your Intel CPU from Plundervolt attacks can ruin your overclock/undervolt

    upload_2019-12-12_2-56-2.png
    [​IMG]
    Don't bother with Task manager. Have always show wrong values. Equal bugged as the whole OS mess. This time it show it can't read the real boost clocks and only base clock frecuency.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
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  4. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    On some CPUs, when overclocking, the Task Manager reported MHz are not accurate. You would think a big company like Microsoft could hire some better programmers. ThrottleStop and CPU-Z are reporting your CPU correctly.

    Have a look at the Speed Shift Max value in the TPL window. I think that is the reason your CPU is using the 43 multiplier instead of the 47 multiplier. When overclocking, you need to adjust this variable accordingly. Better yet, just increase it to 255 so it does not interfere with overclocking.
     
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  5. IvanPetrov

    IvanPetrov Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi there.

    Found some issue with CPU Cache IccMax in Throttlestop?

    Throttlestop 8.70.6 reports the Cache IccMax = 11A.
    But XTU and HWiNFO reports Cache IccMax = 140A, and SystemAgent IccMax = 11A.
    So, I'm thinking, if I undervolt the CPU Cache with the Throttlestop, and apply settings - will it also set 11A for the Cache IccMax, instead of 140A..? How bad it can be?

    Screenshots (XTU reports are for example, HWiNFO gives the same values):
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Hi @unclewebb.
    Sorry to disturb you. Did you have time to check my message?
     
  7. onrblbl

    onrblbl Notebook Guru

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    I've fixed my problem after i removed the speedstep. Now it started like i desire. I also said that it was fixed by set multiplier option but it wasn't.
     
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    I had a quick look at the International Rectifier document you sent me and you know what? I do not have the slightest clue what that document is all about. I know it is written in English but that did not help me any. I know how to read and write a few registers in Intel CPUs but beyond that, my knowledge of electronics, etc., is extremely limited. I wish I could help you more but I don't have the necessary background.

    When Speed Shift is enabled (SST), checking the ThrottleStop Set Multiplier function should not have any control over the CPU speed. Glad to hear that you finally got everything sorted out.

    ThrottleStop was programmed without access to the full documentation from Intel. That means the IccMax adjusters in ThrottleStop may not be using the correct name. I am not sure if HWiNFO is based on proper documentation from Intel or if the programmer of HWiNFO simply copied what Intel XTU calls these IccMax values. I will have to assume that they are both correct and ThrottleStop is wrong.

    On the 7th Gen desktop CPU I used for testing, the only one that seemed to matter was the Core IccMax value. Adjusting the other two as low as zero did not result in any throttling. Adjusting them high or low did not make any difference so there was no need to adjust them. I recommend setting all of the IccMax adjusters to 255.75. This should prevent any IccMax related throttling.

    If you want to do some testing, use the TS Bench 1024M to put a load on your CPU, open up Limit Reasons and then open up the FIVR window and adjust these IccMax values from high to low to see if any of them cause any throttling when adjusted too low. If you learn anything new, post some pics of your results.
     
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  9. maffle

    maffle Notebook Evangelist

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  10. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Nope, I don’t think so. But check what microcode you have then search on release date for it. You can see the ucode version in TS Fivr window, Hwinfo or the Win register.

    If you got a new bios version, not the first time this screw up.
     
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