The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. amihail91

    amihail91 Notebook Consultant

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    But as I was saying, I have access to the XTU menu in the BIOS, and it works.
     
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  2. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    Yes, I do as well and that is a good thing to have. But, maybe I am not explaining it well enough. If true functionality is present, then you don't need XTU installed. If XTU changes the BIOS settings permanently then it really works and you can uninstall XTU after making the changes. The changes will stick forever, or until you clear the CMOS. (That's how it used to be, when XTU was actually a good and respectable product. And, before Nazi control freaks started doing digital castration with firmware cancer.)

    If it only works with XTU installed, then it's not really doing anything that ThrottleStop doesn't do. Your XTU menu in the BIOS is merely unblocking XTU access, which also unblocks it for ThrottleStop and other Windows software at the same time.
     
  3. amihail91

    amihail91 Notebook Consultant

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    Maybe I've worded my question wrong. :p

    Am I able to revert the changes I've made in Throttlestop and use it as a Profile switcher app while dialing in the undervolts through the BIOS XTU menu?

    Or - if I reset my Throttlestop profile and dial the undervolts in through the BIOS menu, will Throttlestop realize this when I open it for the first time?
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
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  4. M4cr0s

    M4cr0s Notebook Consultant

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    I've come across an issue here with MSI Afterburner. Maybe it's well know, but I just had a d'oh moment.

    What I see:

    1. At idle, the CPU pulls an extra 10-15w according to Throttlestop and Hwmonitor. This persist if I kill Throttlestop.

    2. This carries over into under load as well, say in TS Bench. Without Afterburner running my uv'd 9750H will pull at most 60ish watts in TS Bench and I get no limit triggers. With Afterburner it will draw 70ish, other settings being the same. However, total system load when running a game are more or less the same according to HWmonitor. The system seem to be butting up against the max TDP limits (especially GPU) and will pull around 165w, which makes sense, as it's sold with a 180w powerbrick.

    It gets weirder though.

    3. If I load up for instance Photoshop which will use the Nvidia GPU, suddenly everything is back to "normal". As if Afterburner wasn't running.

    Screenies:

    Afterburner running, Nvidia GPU not active. Watts around 16-22.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Afterburner killed, watts mostly in the 2.8 - 6 range. Quite some background stuff running though.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And finally, Afterburner running and Nvidia GPU activated, not idling quite as low, but well under 10w and down to 3ish.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Any ideas whats causing this? It's not like a major problem, but I see no reason why the system should not stay as cool as possible, also when idle. I almost never run off of battery, so thats the least of my concerns. Also, there is definitely, based on benchmarking, a performance hit from running Afterburner, even with a slight GPU core/mem OC.
     
  5. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    If you make changes with XTU without ThrottleStop running and then launch ThrottleStop, it will try to apply your profile settings and undo what you set with XTU. You would need to first delete the ThrottleStop.ini file to "adopt" the XTU settings and then save that as a profile. If you do not have XTU running and change settings with Throttlestop, then launch XTU you may see an error message from XTU that says something to the effect that other software is in control.

    That is pretty strange. I haven't noticed this before. It might be happening without me noticing.

    What it could be is Afterburner is doing something to tweak the Intel HD Graphics when it is launched. That might explain the increased CPU power consumption with Afterburner running. All that would need to happen is to have another 3D process running in the background to create a bit of load on the Intel iGPU to cause a bump in the power consumption. If you have web browser hardware acceleration enabled in the browser setting, even something as innocuous as the web browser being open will create a small amount of GPU load. That often increases with the number of tabs that are open, and varies depending on the web content in the open tab(s).

    You can run GPU Shark to see what 3D processes are running in the background.
     
  6. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Set the voltage in the bios.
    Before running ThrottleStop, delete the ThrottleStop.INI config file.
    Start ThrottleStop so it can create a new config file. TS will read your CPU's current settings.
    Open up the FIVR window and make sure Unlock adjustable voltage is not checked for core, cache, etc.
    When these boxes are not checked, ThrottleStop should be able to run without it adjusting your voltage.

    Now the question is, why do you want to do this? Time and time again, XTU has not applied voltages consistently, especially after resuming from sleep. If there is a slight glitch when booting up, XTU might decide that your under volt is not stable and it might reset it to zero, with or without your knowledge. Do you really want something like that running on your computer? Why? By comparison, ThrottleStop has an excellent track record of applying the voltages 100% consistently.

    @M4cr0s - Not sure what is going on but I do know that it can be tough doing any meaningful testing if you have a lot of stuff running in the background on your system. When idle, you should be seeing individual cores spending 99% of their time in C7 and the reported C0% on the main screen should be 0.5% or less. I can remember other users reporting similar problems but I cannot remember if their issues were ever solved. Play it safe. Only run TS when gaming. There is not a lighter weight monitoring app on the planet!

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Sig. Duck

    Sig. Duck Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi everyone!! esplecially @unclewebb
    I've been using throttlestop for a while now and i think it's a fantastic software, It has really helped my PC to cool temperatures down, but since i'm a newbie about everything related to undervolt i had to read a looooot of information on throttlestop and how ti works....but there are many things and features that I still do not understand because of my ignorance on the subject.

    So i'm here looking for some advice, my goal is to keep the temperatures as low as possible and at the same time have the maximum possible performance from my pc (HP pavilion gaming cx0999nl).

    i know screeshots are very appreciated, so I attach some of them so that you can see my throttlestop configuration which I feel quite stable but I have the feeling of being able to do more, perhaps not in terms of undervolt but in terms of performance, maybe adjusting some throttlestop setting.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    @Sig. Duck - Most your settings look good. Some people have had success setting the CPU core offset voltage to a much higher number compared to the cache offset voltage. If the CPU is stable with the cache at -125 mV, they have used numbers like -250 mV for the core.

    The other thing I noticed is that you have Speed Shift EPP set to 80 on the main screen but if you look at your FIVR screenshot, the monitoring table in the top right corner is reporting that your CPU is using an EPP value of 127. This usually means that Windows is in charge of the EPP setting and ThrottleStop is being ignored. If you want Windows to control EPP then you do not need to check or set the Speed Shift - EPP value on the main screen. If you want ThrottleStop to be in control of EPP then try using a different Windows power profile. In the Power Options I use the Windows High Performance power profile and this setting allows ThrottleStop to be in control of EPP. Not sure about what the latest versions of Windows 10, so do some hands on testing.

    You might also want to try using the FIVR Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits feature. You did not mention if you are having any unusual throttling problems. If you do not have any problems then there is no need to adjust anything.
     
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  9. Sig. Duck

    Sig. Duck Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks very much @unclewebb for your reply.

    i'm using windows 10 build 1909 and throttlestop seems working fine

    you're right, my windows power profile is set to "balanced mode" thus Windows control EPP and that's why EPP valure is 127 instead of 80. Even though I'm in balanced mode, I noticed that throttlestop control EPP value but only when pc is charging.
    Do you think it's better to switch to "High performance power profile" and let Throttlestop control speedshift all the time? if so, my concern is that it could reduce battery life

    this feature caught my attention, but I don't understand exactly what it is for...i know it's related to "turbo boost power limits" in TPL menu, but again i don't know what "turbo power limits" meants and what are the correct values I should set instead of the default ones
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
  10. M4cr0s

    M4cr0s Notebook Consultant

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    Aye, I need to attempt to test this in a more structured manner. To mention some, I run things like Google Drive Sync, the bare necessities of Adobe background services for Creative Cloud to actually work (man they fill up your system with so many tasks). proprietary fan control software, Outlook client and always Chrome with a gazillion tabs. some chat clients like Skype and Whatsapp...and the list goes on and on. It's a nightmare. Hard to keep the "what has to run" list short when you use the laptop for "everything". Oh, and then you have Steam and various other launchers that have to run based on what you are doing.

    But I digress, I do use Hwmonitor + Rivatuner for OSD in games. Couple of reasons for that. Howmonitor can show pretty much anything it can read in OSD, thats awesome. It allows me to see approx wattage pulled by GPU/CPU, and when knowing what is max TDP, that is quite interesting and revealing info. A lot of games work a bit differently from what I though. Also, I want temps, FPS and at times clockspeed since I'm anal about such. It can be hotkeyed too. Additionally, there's stats in Hwmonitor you just don't get from Throttlestop (but I do love TS) and I can't live w/o a proper monitoring software on a modified laptop where I need to see whats happening and what I've screwed up.

    Now, I have however done quite a bit of testing about this vs performance, mainly using actual ingame benchmarks, but also 3Dmark with its tendency to drift back and forth in scores quite a bit. Hwmonitor set to 2-second polling and Rivatuner puts very little load on the system in the sense that it do not affect ingame performance much. In fact it's hardly possible to detect. The story might be different on a slightly older duos or quadcores.

    So. Much. Crap. And thats just the top of the iceberg.
    2019-11-19_234624.jpg
     
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