The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    As with any setting in ThrottleStop, is it causing a throttling problem? If you adjust the Cache IccMax value sky high and nothing changes, that means it really does not matter. If you lower a setting and your CPU starts throttling and Limit Reasons lights up like a Christmas tree, that's a problem.

    Always keep in mind that ThrottleStop was written by one guy with no proper documentation from Intel and with no recent hardware for testing purposes. Some settings that I find hiding in the CPU might be incorrectly labelled or adjusting what I have found might not do anything at all. When I am not sure, I might add a slider so users can adjust something. Then I have to endlessly search forums to see if someone, somewhere finds a use for a feature that I have added.

    Seems like a bizarre way to have to write software like this but overall, it has worked out pretty good so far.
     
  2. amihail91

    amihail91 Notebook Consultant

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    Setting them higher certainly seems to make the machine feel blazing fast but it could all be in my head. o_O

    I noticed Throttlestop doesn't allow changing System Agent IccMax but Intel XTU does - what exactly is this affecting?
     
  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Not sure. Do some testing, check for throttling. If your CPU can run at its full rated speed, none of these settings matter.

    Some items that Intel XTU lets you adjust might not be doing anything at all. XTU allows me to adjust the power limits on my 4th Gen CPU but these limits are locked and cannot be adjusted. When I check the CPU registers, nothing has changed. Just because XTU was written by a big company and they should know what they are doing does not guarantee anything.

    Do you have any throttling problems?
     
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  4. Striker1234

    Striker1234 Notebook Consultant

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    Another question:

    Should I uninstall XTU if using Throotlestop?
    There are services running belonging with XTU.
     
  5. redmop

    redmop Notebook Consultant

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    Yes. Absolutely. They can conflict.
     
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  6. lucidchaos

    lucidchaos Notebook Enthusiast

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    I've been systematically working through my undervolt, benching, and tuning for the last couple days or so. XPS 9570 w/ i7 8750h chip.

    I made the potential mistake of checking "Disable and Lock PL3" in the TPL settings. The register now contains "840C8A00". If I understand correctly, that means it's locked, but the values aren't zeroed out.

    Since then I've re-flashed the bios and started looking into RW Anything so I can at least "undo" that setting, as I don't have a solid understanding of exactly what PL3 does (other than a deep sleep state.)

    2 questions:
    * What must I do to "reset" this?
    * Do we fully understand what this register will be used for in current and future generations of chips?

    Thanks for your support - amazing software - from a dude who used it 9 years ago :D

    [​IMG]
     
  7. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    The good news is the values in that register are so high that they should not become a limiting factor or cause any throttling.

    You might have clicked on this accidentally or the lock bit might be set by the bios. If something shows that it is locked in ThrottleStop and you are trying to unlock it,

    1) Exit ThrottleStop
    2) Delete the ThrottleStop.INI configuration file
    3) Completely shutdown Windows. Hold the Shift key down on your keyboard while selecting the Windows Shutdown menu option.
    4) Restart your computer.
    5) After you have booted up, run ThrottleStop and it will create a new ThrottleStop.INI configuration file.
    6) Open up the TPL window and see what value is in the Power Limit 3 register.

    I never got a lot of feedback about this feature so it is possible that there is a bug. If you click on the Disable and Lock PL3 box and this register is already locked by the bios, ThrottleStop will continue to show a value in this register. You can use ThrottleStop to lock this register if it is not locked already but you cannot use ThrottleStop to unlock this register. In your situation, I am guessing that the bios has locked this register.

    Where have you been? You have been using ThrottleStop for 9 years and you have only posted 9 messages on NotebookReview?
    We will call you one of ThrottleStop's silent supporters. If you would have asked me back then if TS would still be going strong in 2019 I would have probably said, "No Way!!!!" Glad I kept at it.
     
  8. lucidchaos

    lucidchaos Notebook Enthusiast

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    Exited TS, deleted .ini, shut down holding shift. TS launched with the warning message as if first time running. Lock and disable PL3 is still grayed, same value in register (840C8A00).

    I recall the disable and lock checkbox unticked and text not grayed out when browsing through a couple reinstallations. I don't recall what the register value was before I checked the box, but it was a similarly seemingly random non-zero value.

    How would I go about removing the lock bit? I just don't like that I can't undo something, especially if I locked a dynamic value in place.

    Same! I've been in and out of enthusiast communities. The pursuit of higher clocks in notebooks has led me many places - pin modding, hardware mods, PLL mods... all sorts of new things to learn and push the limits.

    For the first time, I get to use the same tool in completely new ways to bring the best out of my chip - and there's so much more there than what I originally used it for (setting the TPL from 10W to 30W).
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
  9. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    The first 8 in that register represents the lock bit.

    Your bios is setting the lock bit and there is nothing you can do about it.

    That is possible. Were you using a different bios version at the time?

    As I already mentioned, this is not that important to your laptop. The power limit in that register is set high enough that it will not be a factor in any throttling. With a low power U series CPU, there are other power limits that you need to be concerned about.

    That is one thing I like about ThrottleStop. A single tool that covers the older Core 2 and all of the Core i series. TS automatically changes and varies what options are available depending on what CPU it detects. Programming and maintaining this has been a pain in the butt with buttons and features randomly appearing and disappearing. I no longer own a wide enough variety of hardware for testing purposes.
     
  10. lucidchaos

    lucidchaos Notebook Enthusiast

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    Okay, Good to know that there is definitely no harm done. I was concerned that I would no longer be able to enter S3 sleep state. Got PL3 and S3 mixed up.

    I still like to know where info would be stored, other than changing the register lock bit, that would gray out the TS option. Call it an instinctual discomfort of making an uneducated and unintended permanent change. (The "oh s***" moment)

    I did not change BIOS versions. The text grayed immediately upon checking and never came back even with a bios rewrite and .ini deletion.

    Edit: I'm good now that I had a little time to reflect and get away from the problem. There's so many positives I haven't mentioned - I am able to run -250mV core / -125mV cache stable and completely eliminate any sort of throttling while benchmarking. This while also running much higher clocks on the dGPU thanks to having the available power overhead. My 2018 XPS 15 is keeping pace with, or outperforming, most 2019 machines. Plus I get the added benefit of a couple more hours of battery when I'm using it casually. I'm loving it :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2019
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