The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

    Reputations:
    23,032
    Messages:
    23,732
    Likes Received:
    41,251
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Test both ways. Only testing will give you the results you hope for. ThrottleStop have own benchmarks. Use it in your testing.
     
  2. Krzyslaw

    Krzyslaw Notebook Geek

    Reputations:
    25
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    26
    :D Sorry I missread you :)
    If you go with cache more than core you are good to go, but try set this equal, because if your cpu can handle higher cpu cache than core, it should also handle the same UV
     
  3. ihueco

    ihueco Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I can't find were I was told to UV cache more than core but rn I have to settle at 125 UV. I UV both at the same time and more than that crashes my laptop. I will start to increase individually and see how it goes.
     
  4. Automatikjack

    Automatikjack Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    130
    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Hey guys, been digging around for information about 8th gen intel thinkpads and throttlestop and haven't seen a whole lot. Like others in this thread it's the WHEA uncorrectable error (which has been mentioned) in this thread. I haven't had much luck getting this to behave itself with my T480 (8th gen i5) or X1 Yoga 3rd gen (8th gen i7) to stick and behave themselves when using the throttlestop guide. My question is, the guide was made with skylake in mind for recommended offsets and I am not using it for skylake. Will the same strategies mentioned in the guide still apply?

    For example:
    GPU -50mv
    Cpu Core and Cache need the same offset.

    Thanks
     
  5. ihueco

    ihueco Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I don't know a lot about the subject, but I have got quite a few BSOD after undervolting. Most of them of course showing WHEA uncorrectable error. From my cases, it was because I undervolted too much the CPU. If this didn't happen before you started undervolting, then it is definitely because of undervolting. Reduce the amount of undervolt you are doing and check for a stable value. You can also try to undervolt GPU and CPU separately.
     
  6. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

    Reputations:
    23,032
    Messages:
    23,732
    Likes Received:
    41,251
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Add in iGPU Unslice voltage offset equal as for iGPU and your're good to go.

    From your own example above...
    iGPU Unslice -50mv
    iGPU -50mv
    Cpu Core and Cache need the same offset.
     
  7. Karta

    Karta Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Ok so pictures:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The rest of the options are the default ones. I enabled Speedshift by just ticking the option in the main window and ran the 3DMark test Time Spy where I see the loss of performance. Then again, I lost about 20% performance in the CPU test, and 5% in the GPU test (due to the CPU). If I disable the SpeedShift and disable the undervolt, I regain the performance but the CPU throttles a lot. I thought about undervolting it to alleviate the temperatures and get more performance.

    Log link: https://pastebin.com/r9uKaNYj

    I also tried to force the error I described in my original message minutes ago disabling the Speedshift and enabling the undervolt at -70mV. The image issues are relative to the Intel GPU as I finally got a blue screen specifying the issue. Maybe I could try installing the Intel official drivers and not the ones provided by Asus? Is that advisable? I am asking because Intel do not advise doing this if I don't need it. Question is, may I need it?

    Thanks a LOT for your help :) Your program is amazing, it's just me not understanding some stuff or my computer being difficult to configure :/
     
  8. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

    Reputations:
    6,666
    Messages:
    5,593
    Likes Received:
    4,270
    Trophy Points:
    431
    Speed Shift 101
    Speed Shift is usually enabled by Windows 10 automatically. Once Speed Shift is enabled within the CPU, you cannot disable it. The only way to disable it is to reboot. When booting up if your bios or Windows 10 enables Speed Shift again, then there truly is no way to disable it. When ThrottleStop shows SST in green, that means Speed Shift is enabled within the CPU. All you can try to do is work with Speed Shift.

    If Speed Shift is enabled, there is a setting called the Energy Performance Preference or EPP. In ThrottleStop this can be adjusted from 0 (max performance) to 255 (minimum performance). Open the FIVR window. Look at the monitoring table in the top right corner. This data is live. It tells you what Speed Shift EPP value your CPU is presently using. Your screenshots above shows Speed Shift EPP at 0 so it is set to maximum performance. That is a good thing when plugged in and gaming.

    On the main screen of ThrottleStop, if you put a check mark in the Speed Shift EPP box, this will tell the CPU to set the Speed Shift EPP value to 128. You can click on the number 128 and change it to whatever you like. An EPP setting of 128 will reduce your CPU's maximum performance. I think your testing might have been comparing a Speed Shift EPP setting of 0 vs a Speed Shift EPP setting of 128. It was not comparing Speed Shift enabled vs Speed Shift disabled. I am not surprised if an EPP setting of 128 is reducing your performance. 80 is a better compromise if you want to slow your CPU down when lightly loaded. When plugged in, I would set EPP to 0 so the CPU can run at maximum performance.

    The Turbo Ratio Limits for an 8750H should be set to 41, 41, 40, 40, 39, 39. The 8750H is locked by Intel. Setting these limits differently than the default values accomplishes nothing.

    In the FIVR window, just below the monitoring table, click on the Install button and follow the directions to download and install the RwDrv.sys file into your ThrottleStop folder. After that you can click on and use the Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits feature.

    I prefer using the latest Intel drivers for the Intel GPU. Did the blue screen tell you what driver or what caused the problem? Most people with the 8750H can undervolt more than -65 mV. Maybe the problem is just your EPP setting.

    Where is a picture of the Turbo Power Limits screen? You may not have changed anything in there but that does not mean that everything is OK. Default settings might be a problem.

    Do you remember if Add Limit Reasons to Log File was checked in the Options window when you ran the attached log file? I do not see any Limit Reasons showing up in the log file. There is definitely some serious throttling going on. I am not yet sure why. Fix EPP and try again. When you run the TS Bench 1024M test, is the multiplier and CPU speed consistent or do you see severe throttling? Open up the Limit Reasons window and take a screenshot while that test is running if you are seeing throttling.

    Edit - You might have something called the Intel Dynamic Platform and Thermal Framework driver installed. Look in your device manager for something similar to that. It too can cause severe throttling and if so, it should be permanently removed.

    @Automatikjack - If you are undervolting and getting WHEA errors then your CPU probably needs more voltage. Every CPU is unique. There is no guide for your CPU. It is all test and tune. If you are getting errors at an offset of -100 mV then you will need to try -90 mV or -80 mV. I would use the same offset voltage for the core and cache and I would leave the iGPU and everything else alone until I had my CPU 100% stable. This is my unofficial guide for an 8th Gen U series CPU.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
    Ernesto Cardoza and 4W4K3 like this.
  9. golovkin

    golovkin Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    @unclewebb
    Hello unclewebb,
    Can I ask you for little help?
    I just managed upgrade my old system H 61 from Pentium to i7-3770s which was very tough as I needed ask for help bios experts to modify my SPI image.
    Now system is stable and I really enjoy 3 gen with Throttlestop.
    Than I found something about possibly unlocking 4 turbo bins and I would like give it to try.
    Do you think should I go for another bios mod to unlock advanced settings for core ratio (currently I can see at AMIBCP hidden setting for it), or em I stuck here without any chance whatsoever?
    MSR register 0x194 shows 0x00190000 and cant be rewrite to 8. After reboot still shows same bit 9, also bit 1 cant be rewrite.
    Maxmulti shows I am on max but TS shows same core ratio limits.
    When I click on memory tab at RWE I got bluescreen....
    Thanks very much for your reply sir
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
  10. Samchanchan11

    Samchanchan11 Notebook Geek

    Reputations:
    5
    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Is 90W for PL2 high enough? I've been getting PL2 limit reason is TS and I'm not sure if I should upped my PL2 power limit. Is there a limit of how high I should set my PL2 limit? According to TS my max temp reached 89, I assume that's when it actually draw the 90W. The highest I ever saw it draw on benchmark was 70s on cinebench. Does raising PL2 limit as long as it doesn't temp throttle make sense or is it not good for the components?
     
Loading...

Share This Page