The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Is there a way to change the Platform Power Limit from within Windows? Now that my MateBook X Pro can run unconstrained (up to 48W package) without DPTF interfering, it shuts down when I load the CPU on battery, because the 7.6V battery can't supply enough power. I'd like to prevent that by creating a script that limits the Platform as a whole to 40W whenever on battery.
     
  2. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    Reduce your TS battery profile's ICCmax setting in FIVR to cap your maximum power consumption exactly where you want it. You'll want the heaviest possible test load to help determine your ideal ICCmax setting though. (Also undervolt first if you haven't already.)
     
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  3. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I was hoping to do it through Platform instead of the CPU itself because then I can account for the entire system's power draw (GPU, VRM, whatever), which is what the battery ultimately cares about, instead of having to extrapolate from the power draw of individual components.
     
  4. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    I see what you're going for now. CPU is still going to be the bulk of your power consumption on a machine like yours though. A quick search online tells me it is possible to manually power limit (some/most?) Nvidia GPUs on Linux but I'm not sure if Windows has an equivalent function or method short of using MSI Afterburner to set temperature limits and/or a custom GPU voltage curve if your machine or GPU even allow for that in the first place (sadly, my Dell's GTX1060MQ does not).

    EDIT:

    @Brad331 have you tried the NVIDIA SMI? I'm not sure if laptop GPUs work with it or not.

    https://cryptomining-blog.com/tag/nvidia-tdp-limit-nvidia-power-limit/
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
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  5. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for the tips! My main concern is actually not the GPU using too much power (since it's the MX250 1D52 limited to 10W anyway), but simply that all the components have varying amounts of load at any time. Therefore to be safe, I have to set my CPU Core current limit for the worst cast scenario: when the CPU, iGPU, dGPU, SSD etc are all loaded, like when rendering in Premiere Pro. Running an AIDA64 stress test with all of those checked, the discharge rate goes way over 70W unlesss I limit the Core to 18A. But that gives me a measly 2GHz max clock, which is wasted headroom whenever I'm on a different kind of workload. For example, it becomes an unnecessary bottleneck when I'm scrolling through a heavy webpage, which is a CPU+iGPU only workload. It's pretty crazy, when I stress everything except CPU Core, I can still discharge at 59W!
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
  6. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Consultant

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    It is highly unlikely that your battery cannot supply enough power. As you noted without stressing the CPU it could discharge at 59W. It is probably the CPU power limit tripping some hidden register that prevents some component from overloading (maybe VRMs). This is common in a lot of notebooks. The explanation that I remember is that the EC has some current-trip limit and shuts the notebook down. It's not possible to override (as far as I'm aware) this limit without modding your BIOS. IIRC the Matebook X has a 60Whr battery. With the majority of regular li-ions (or lipos), it is perfectly safe to discharge at up to 2C (That's 120W for you)

    It is possible with your battery that you were on low battery - the high discharge rate combined with the (perhaps unusually high) internal resistance of the batteries caused a sudden voltage sag which activated the under-voltage lockout. (usually about 6-6.6V)

    Nice guide on your website btw. I sustained 40W on my previous Xiaomi Mi notebook pro 8250U with stock heatsink, but with liquid metal and 25W MX150. I hadn't bothered to add heatpipes and pads because I didn't know where the heat was coming from without an IR camera. These chinese brands have better cooling on their ultrabooks than some gaming laptops!
     
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  7. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you for the insight! It was actually fully charged, but I can believe that if a high discharge rate can cause a low-charge battery to sag, an even higher discharge rate can cause even a fully charged battery to sag.
    Anyway, battery or EC, the effect is the same: limited power when on battery. Therefore we need some kind of limiter, or reinstate DPTF but with laxer parameters — because DPTF used to prevent this from happening. Unfortunately, I can't access the DPTF configuration because the BIOS menu is locked and the EFI registers in the IFR of this device are all mixed up. If anybody knows another way, please let me know.
     
  8. yahyoh

    yahyoh Notebook Enthusiast

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    Im having problem with throttlestop and my new acer helios 300, if throttlestop is open turbo power limit wont work it will be stuck at 45 watt same as without turbo.
    any help appreciated
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
  9. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Are you trying to go higher than 45 Watts?

    Intel CPUs have duplicate power limits. Make sure you have checked the FIVR - Disable and Lock Turbo Power Limits box and installed the RwDrv.sys file into your ThrottleStop folder so this feature will work. You can download it here.

    https://mega.nz/#!CNNA0SoC!Z2Xi2icwX4d4jzW016dKnKGhVglWmSSPpgiRU7VCG6g

    This works on many laptops but not all. Some laptops with the 8750H are locked to a maximum of 45 Watts and there is nothing you can do about it with software. I would not recommend buying a laptop if I knew it had that limitation.
     
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  10. yahyoh

    yahyoh Notebook Enthusiast

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    actually its the new helios 2019 with 9750h which has turbo mode aka PL1 of 56 watt instead of 45 watt but when throttlestop is running it wont be able to change it to 56 watt from 45 watt, seems something to do with TPL.
     
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