The ThrottleStop Guide

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by unclewebb, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    @unclewebb Today I was experimenting with different SST values and guess what those values in turn control Turbo boost as well.
    <127 Turbo boost is enabled and boosts to advertised clocks, 180 and above causes CPU to max out at stock clocks and doesn't turbo unless we choose value of 130-140 to boost it 28-31x.
    Have you noticed it? I accidentally noticed it. OEMs can decide to throttle behind the scenes (via BIOS) using higher EPP Values eventhough XTU and similar tools say Turbo boost is working. I guess it applies to Linux/OS X as well.
     
  2. jar3259

    jar3259 Notebook Enthusiast

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    @unclewebb sorry for the late response. Here is my C state and main screen at idle. I am on Windows 10. cstate.PNG
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  3. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    I do not think Intel is a big fan of my work. They have never sent me anything, ever. This project has always been financed from my own pocket. Adding Ice Lake support to ThrottleStop is probably not going to happen. :(

    I only know about the registry tweak that disables all of the C states including C3 which partially disables turbo boost. On my 4700MQ I can use this trick and still have access to the 34 multiplier but this blocks the 36 multiplier. I have not tried this trick recently. A driver error in the Device Manager does not sound good.

    I think I did. That is why I do not recommend setting Speed Shift EPP to anything greater than 80. I prefer full performance over power savings. The standard setting of 128 can reduce maximum performance in some situations and going higher will kill more turbo boost. How much performance you lose depends on the CPU and the type of load you are running.

    All of your C states are disabled in that screenshot. That is usually not a good thing when you are using a laptop. Your laptop is not very idle. Any idea what is running in the background? Did you follow some forum advice and deliberately disable your C states? Doing that and using the Disable Turbo option reduces maximum performance. Disabling the C states can increase power consumption and heat. If you have done this deliberately then it looks good. If not, maybe check the registry to see if you can find out what the problem is. I will search this forum thread. If I find the C state registry tweak, I will post a link so you can see if this needs to be reversed.

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/the-throttlestop-guide.531329/page-75#post-7783166

    @geust123455 - This trick still works in Windows 10 but I see what you mean. The Device Manager shows exclamation points for each of the cores.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2019
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  4. Mr.K-1994

    Mr.K-1994 Notebook Consultant

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    @unclewebb Should I let the SST on at 180 when undervolting for battery life? Or at 80 when undervolting for performance.
     
  5. Xatanú

    Xatanú Notebook Consultant

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    Hi @unclewebb, please, take a minute to review my question if you have some time:
    What's the "overclock" checkbox that's under the groupbox "Turbo Ration Limits" in the FIVR window intended for? By default it's unchecked and the value beside reads 80. I have tried checking it and I don't appreciate any difference (my processor is a 9900K).

    Thank you very much for everything!
     
  6. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Thanks. 128/127 is too slow, I found 0, 80 and 180 to be best for Max performance, web browsing/gaming and on battery.
    You might wanna pin this link to OP so that, all users can tweak windows for better C States %age(better battery life or power savings) http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...e-on-windows-enabling-deeper-c-states.815602/
     
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  7. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Maybe. I rarely use my laptop on battery power so I am not an expert on this subject. Do some testing. See what works best for you and your laptop. I like a fast laptop even when running on battery power. Fast = efficient. I think a quick burst of speed allows the CPU to get tasks done quickly. This allows the individual cores to spend a bigger percentage of time in the low power C7 state. A slow CPU consumes slightly less power compared to a fast CPU but it stays in this slow and sluggish state for a much longer period of time. Slow is highly overrated. Maybe an EPP setting of 80 is OK for battery run time too. People think that when on battery power that a slow CPU is best. I disagree. It also depends a lot on what type of app you are running.

    The Overclock box needs to be checked if you are going to run your 9900K or any CPU beyond its default Intel specs. The default maximum multiplier is 50 so for a lot of people, that might be enough as is. Some people want to run the 50 multiplier whether 1, 2, 3, ... or 8 cores are active. This is running a 9900K beyond its default spec so I am pretty sure that the ThrottleStop Overclock box needs to be checked to accomplish this. Do some testing and run the built in TS Bench test to see what multipliers you get.

    The maximum possible multiplier for the 9900K is approximately 80. I do not own a 9900K and I do not have proper documentation from Intel so I am not 100% sure about that. So far, no one has contacted me to complain that this setting in ThrottleStop only goes up to 80. I think being able to overclock a 9900K up to 8000 MHz (80 X 100 MHz) should be adequate for the majority of users.

    @Vasudev - Thanks for the link. I will definitely add it to the first post in this thread. Lots of good info in there for people looking to minimize power consumption. In Windows 10 -1809, I am still having a problem where package C3 and package C6 are not available after I resume from sleep. They both work fine after I initially start up. There must be a bad driver or something, somewhere. Lots of good C state tips in that link should help me track this bug down. I am back to blaming Microsoft.
     
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  8. jar3259

    jar3259 Notebook Enthusiast

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    @unclewebb I don't have anything really running in the background.
    I mostly followed what is posted here:
    https://www.reddit.com/r/Dell/comments/99o8k9/my_journey_to_finally_cool_down_the_xps_15_9560/
    Would disabling the Intel Thermal Management stuff have caused this?
    I don't recall disabling C States, so if there is a simple way to do that and I did it by mistake, please let me know.
    My work is in audio, so when I need the extra processing power I will turn on turbo, but I just don't like to see the temperature in the 80s.
     
  9. unclewebb

    unclewebb ThrottleStop Author

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    Intel considers any temperature under 100°C to be a "safe operating temperature". No need to worry about whether your CPU feels comfy or not. It is designed to look after itself and it will live a long life as long as the temperature is safe.

    [​IMG]

    To check on your C states, run the regedit program and navigate to this item.

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\intelppm

    [​IMG]

    Inside this folder is a REG_DWORD value called Start. If this is set to 4, it will disable the majority of your C states. By default, Windows usually sets Start to 3. If this needs to be changed, double click on Start, change it to 3 and then reboot for the change to take effect.

    The amount of time your CPU cores spend in the C0 state is a good indication of how idle your CPU is and it will show you how much stuff must be running in the background. After a clean install of Windows, less than 0.5% is normal for a 4 core CPU.

    [​IMG]

    The picture you posted is nowhere close to that. Open up the Task Manager, go to the Details tab and find out what is running on your computer when it is supposed to be idle. The low power C states will not be used if the CPU is busy spinning its wheels, trying to process 101 or 1001 background tasks.

    Why is Clock Modulation checked in ThrottleStop? Very few recent computers use this throttling method anymore so there is usually no need to check this. Check the Mod column in ThrottleStop or in the ThrottleStop log file. If Clock Modulation is not checked and this column of data constantly shows 100.0 when it is loaded, that means your laptop is not using this throttling method so no need to check this box to fight against something that is not happening.
     
  10. Xatanú

    Xatanú Notebook Consultant

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    Thank you very much for your response @unclewebb. Everything is clear now.
    The maximum overclock I plan to perform is 5.2 MHz or even 5.3 MHz if I'm lucky, but maybe I will reach the power limit at 5.2 MHz, it's a laptop. Apart from that I think anything over 6 MHz in my machine would require liquid cooling and for 8 MHz liquid nitrogen for sure, but the voltages needed to run at that frequency would fry the VRMs of my laptop, LOL
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2019
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