The rise and fall of Kaspersky?

Discussion in 'Security and Anti-Virus Software' started by Papusan, Sep 9, 2017.

?

Will this be the fall for Kaspersky?

  1. YES

    11 vote(s)
    57.9%
  2. NO

    8 vote(s)
    42.1%
  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Roses are red, Kaspersky is blue: 'That ban's unconstitutional!' Boo hoo hoo
    New front opens in Russian firm's legal fight with US gov
    By Gareth Corfield 14 Feb 2018 at 14:05

    "Kaspersky Lab, the antivirus house, now claims that the US government's ban on its products amounts to punishment without trial.
    In court filings made late last year Kaspersky said it was intending to use the US Administrative Procedure Act to get the ban declared unconstitutional. Now, according to local reports, the Russian company is bringing the US Constitution's Bill of Attainder clause, which forbids punishment without trial, into play to bolster its legal arguments.

    The American Department of Homeland Security (DHS) banned the use of Kaspersky products in September 2017 across the entire US government.

    Controversy had arisen in American governmental circles that a National Security Agency contractor (NSA – a snooping agency like Britain's GCHQ but better scrutinised) who took his work home with him had leaked software exploits intended to be used for hacking by US government agents thanks to an unintentional upload to the Kaspersky cloud. The Americans convinced themselves that Russian-owned Kaspersky had given access to these exploits to Kremlin intelligence services, though the company denies this.

    Not long after the ban, GCHQ in the UK issued a similar order to government departments over here for information classified as Secret or above.

    Kaspersky's PR firm told The Register today: "Kaspersky Lab maintains that the DHS decision is unconstitutional and relied on subjective, non-technical public sources, such as uncorroborated and often anonymously sourced media reports, related claims, and rumors. Furthermore, DHS has failed to provide the company adequate due process to rebut the unsubstantiated allegations underlying the BOD and has not provided any evidence of wrongdoing by the company."

    America is becoming increasingly allergic to foreign tech companies' wares, on the grounds that what its spies euphemistically call "computer network exploitation" might come home to roost.
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    US officials: Kaspersky “Slingshot” report burned anti-terror operation
    Joint Special Operations Command ran campaign against ISIS, Al Qaeda for at least 6 years.
    SEAN GALLAGHER - 3/21/2018, 9:22 AM
    https://arstechnica.com/information...ort-apparently-exposed-us-military-cyber-ops/

    "A malware campaign discovered by researchers for Kaspersky Lab this month was in fact a US military operation, according to a report by CyberScoop's Chris Bing and Patrick Howell O'Neill. Unnamed US intelligence officials told CyberScoop that Kaspersky's report had exposed a long-running Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) operation targeting the Islamic State and Al Qaeda.

    The malware used in the campaign, according to the officials, was used to target computers in Internet cafés where it was believed individuals associated with the Islamic State and Al Qaeda would communicate with their organizations' leadership. Kaspersky's report showed Slingshot had targeted computers in countries where ISIS, Al Qaeda, and other radical Islamic terrorist groups have a presence or recruit: Afghanistan, Yemen, Iraq, Jordan, Turkey, Libya, Sudan, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The publication of the report, the officials contended, likely caused JSOC to abandon the operation and may have put the lives of soldiers fighting ISIS and Al Qaeda in danger. One former intelligence official told CyberScoop that it was standard operating procedure "to kill it all with fire once you get caught... It happens sometimes and we’re accustomed to dealing with it. But it still sucks. I can tell you this didn’t help anyone."

    JSOC is part of the US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and has in the past incorporated electronic warfare and signals intelligence units in its operations as part of its "special reconnaissance" mission. US Navy SEALs, Army Special Forces and Rangers, and other special operations units have worked in tandem in the past; a JSOC unit called the Computer Network Operations Squadron (CNOS) was formed in 2007, prior to the formation of US Cyber Command. CNOS operated from Fort Meade (where US Cyber Command and the National Security Agency are headquartered) and at CIA's headquarters in Langley, Virginia.

    In his 2015 book Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command, Army Times journalist Sean Naylor described one example of how special operations teams used malware in Iraq, using "Mohawks"—Iraqis recruited by US Special Forces to serve as a counter-intelligence team—to install spyware onto targeted computers:

    Mohawks would enter the Internet café without arousing suspicion and upload software onto the computers. Sometimes the software was of the keystroke recognition type, at other times it would covertly activate a webcam if the computer had one, allowing the task force to positively identify a target... The insurgents often thought they were exercising good communications security by sharing one account with a single password and writing messages to each other that they saved as drafts rather than sending... But the keystroke tracking software meant JSOC personnel in the United States were reading every word.

    Kaspersky's exposure of the program will likely not win the company any points in its battle to get off a US federal government blacklist."
     
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  3. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    So ... basically, they're just terribly good at doing what an anti-virus is supposed to be doing; detecting malicious software.

    That it happened to have been used for not-so-malicious purposes wasn't something that Kaspersky could've known. It wouldn't be like there was a message in the comments section of the code that said something like 'Hey, we're doing this for the benefit of mankind, please don't report this particular piece of malware'.

    Don't have a MikroTik router or ever connect to one and already run Kaspersky, but otherwise I'd be sure to install it:
    Now that the word is out it won't be long before greadier actors get their hands on the code and will modify it for their own purposes. Their intended target list will of course be a bit broader in scope than just a few suspected terrorists.
     
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  4. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks!! STAHP! Dont buy FILTH...

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    Twitter Bans Russian Security Firm Kaspersky from Advertising on the Platform
    upload_2018-4-21_2-25-12.png

    Yet again, the screw will be tightened around.

    Twitter has banned Kaspersky, a Russian cybersecurity firm that often finds itself in the middle of the US-Russia cyber cold war, from advertising on the platform. The company suggests that Kaspersky’s business practice “inherently conflicts” with the platform’s advertising policies.

    The decision to ban the cybersecurity firm “is based on our determination that Kaspersky Lab operates using a business model that inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices,” Twitter said in its statement referring to a Department of Homeland Security notice on Kaspersky Lab that talked about the ties between Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence agencies. “Kaspersky Lab may remain an organic user on our platform, in accordance with the Twitter Rules.”
     
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  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Kaspersky Lab loses the privilege of giving Twitter ad money
    Twitter's loss is the EFF's gain
    By Shaun Nichols in San Francisco 20 Apr 2018 at 22:06
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/04/20/kaspersky_lab_loses_the_privilege_of_giving_twitter_money/

    "Twitter says it will no longer run ads from beleaguered security vendor Kaspersky Lab.

    Claiming the company's alleged dealings with the Russian government violates its ad policies, the 280-character shoutfest site says Kaspersky's advertising money is no longer good, but it can still post regular (unpaid) Tweets.

    "This decision is based on our determination that Kaspersky Lab operates using a business model that inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices," a Twitter spokesperson told El Reg

    "Kaspersky Lab may remain an organic user on our platform, in accordance with the Twitter Rules."

    While Twitter did not say specifically what Kaspersky did to run afoul of its policies, the site did note last year's DHS notice expressing fear Kaspersky was sharing information collected from its customers with Russian intelligence agencies. Kaspersky has denied the claim and no proof has been offered.

    A spokesperson for Kaspersky said Twitter first told the company of its decision in January, but to this day has yet to fully explain what specifically Kaspersky did to violate its advertising rules.

    "Kaspersky Lab considers this action – an advertising ban without any valid reasoning or evidence of misconduct– as being contradictory to Twitter’s principles for freedom of expression," Kaspersky Lab's statement reads.

    "Therefore, the company is calling on Twitter to provide a more specific and detailed explanation of its decision."

    In the meantime, Kaspersky says it will be making the best of the situation by converting its Twitter advertising budget to a charitable donation to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

    CEO and founder Eugene Kaspersky has also issued an open letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey blasting the move and claiming the policy will put Twitter users at risk.

    "The majority of our promoted content on Twitter has been about cybersafety and research and reports about the information security industry. We believe that this content brings value to a variety of Twitter users, including regular folks who want to read simple tips on how to protect themselves and their families against cyberthreats as well as infosecurity experts who are interested in the technical details of our latest research," Kaspersky writes.

    "Twitter is playing into the hands of cybercriminals when it hinders us providing users, for example, with timely, potentially important information on protection from cyber-extortionists." "
     
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  6. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks!! STAHP! Dont buy FILTH...

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    Kaspersky: data storage and development soon in Switzerland, ban in the Netherlands
    In the future, the Dutch government will no longer use software from the security company Kaspersky Lab. At the same time, the company has announced that it will store customer data in Switzerland in the future.

    Kaspersky has been facing allegations of having to cooperate with Russian intelligence for months, leading to bans on using the software in the US. Now, according to media reports, the Dutch government. Thus, by using the software, Justice Minister Ferdinand Grapperhaus was under threat of espionage and sabotage.

    The measure is not substantiated by specific incidents, but by the Russian legislation, according to which Kaspersky would be obliged to cooperate with Russian intelligence services.

    At the same time, Kaspersky Lab has announced that it will build a data center in Switzerland in which user data will be stored in the future. In addition, production will be relocated to Switzerland later this year.


    Sources)
    www.kaspersky.com/blog/swiss-assembled-security/22378/

    www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/netzpolitik/kaspersky-lab-kuenftig-nicht-mehr-auf-niederlaendischen-behoerdenrechnern-erlaubt-a-1207827.html
     
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  7. Georgel

    Georgel Notebook Virtuoso

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    The main issue is that the data leaks are supposedly on the government level, not at the user level, still... |

    I don't think they have what to take from the Romanian government lol.
     
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