The Pentagon bans Huawei and ZTE phones from retail stores on military bases

Discussion in 'Smartphones and Tablets' started by hmscott, May 8, 2018.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The Pentagon bans Huawei and ZTE phones from retail stores on military bases
    By Shannon Liao@Shannon_Liao May 2, 2018, 11:34am EDT
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/2/1...uawei-zte-phones-retail-stores-military-bases

    "The Pentagon is ordering retail outlets on US military bases to stop selling Huawei and ZTE phones. The Department of Defense says using the devices could be a security risk.

    “Huawei and ZTE devices may pose an unacceptable risk to the department’s personnel, information and mission,” a Pentagon spokesperson said in a statement to The Wall Street Journal. “In light of this information, it was not prudent for the department’s exchanges to continue selling them.”

    US military members can still buy Huawei and ZTE devices for personal use from other stores, as there’s no outright ban on that for now. But the spokesperson elaborated that the Pentagon is considering whether it should send out a military-wide advisory about the devices.

    Huawei responded to the news in a statement to The Verge: “Huawei’s products are sold in 170 countries worldwide and meet the highest standards of security, privacy and engineering in every country we operate globally including the US. We remain committed to openness and transparency in everything we do and want to be clear that no government has ever asked us compromise the security or integrity of any of our networks or devices.” The Chinese smartphone maker said it was an “employee-owned company” that would continue to expand globally.

    US government officials have said that China could order its manufacturers to create backdoors for spying in their devices, although both Huawei and ZTE have denied the possibility. An anonymous source told the WSJ that military leaders are wary that Beijing could use ZTE and Huawei devices to locate soldiers’ exact coordinates and track their movements.

    The US government has been making more significant moves against Chinese tech companies since December, although officials have been suspicious of the two companies since before then (such as in 2014 when Huawei was banned from bidding for US government contracts). In a Senate testimony this past February, six major US intelligence heads warned that American citizens shouldn’t use Huawei and ZTE products and services. In January, US lawmakers introduced a bill that would ban US government agencies from using the two companies’ phones and equipment.

    For a separate reason, the US Department of Commerce banned US exports to ZTE last month after the company failed to meet a plea agreement when it pleaded guilty to illegally shipping US equipment to North Korea and Iran. ZTE is appealing the ban. Anonymous sources told the WSJ last week that the Justice Department is now probing Huawei for possibly violating sanctions against Iran.

    We’ve reached out to the Department of Defense and ZTE for further comment.

    Update May 2nd 1:40PM ET: This article has been updated with a statement from Huawei. "
     
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  2. kojack

    kojack Notebook Deity

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    Get your tinfoil hats here....150.00 bucks each....
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  4. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Too lazy to root and flash a homebrew ROM, so just ban outright eh?
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    If you can't trust the software, what makes you think you can trust the hardware? :)

    As that Bruce Schneier article briefly covers, there are lots of incursions into consumer hardware and professional hardware of all origins.

    The direction of choice will likely be to only allow vetted controlled hardware and software in secure locations, no "consumer" hardware allowed. Controlled as in owned by the military or government.

    I am surprised it's taken this long, and that we still aren't there yet.
     
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  6. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    That's the way it should be. But it will likely only happen when they develop their own tech instead of subletting everything.

    That being said rooting and flashing is my go to scenario. More so from a function standpoint than a security initiative.
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Do you write the root hack yourself, or use a "Chinese" root-kit tool? :D
     
  8. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Its usually based on the chipset and if the source is available. Which basically determines my purchasing decision. So the likes of MediaTek or Kirin are hard sells for me on a personal level even though the MediaPad M3 and M3 10 Lite look like excellent Android tablets.

    Its because of that that I stick with the Tab S 8.4 and likely be picking up a second hand Tab S 10.5 mostly because I can look at peoples work on XDA and pick whats best for me, plus AMOLED screen helps. So instead of running with kirin because of the superior sound, ill just plug in 2.0 speakers. Snapdragon and Exynos dont tend to lock up their source code ( or at the very least remain unseen ).

    I have been watching the development for my phone the LG v20, its rootable but a little more complicated than my broken Note 4 (manufacturing defect) or dead m7 (battery went kaput) but look forward to rooting and flashing it in the near future as well. M7 was the easiest gateway for root and flash.

    Probably have more to worry about in apps we install than nefarious built in lines of code in the chipset.
     
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  9. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    This is why unlocked hardware that can run open sourced software and firmware is important. Open sourcing at least takes some of the magic black box mystery out of the equation and allows those interested to vet the code at all levels.
     
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  10. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Unlocked hardware is I guess one thing but that doesnt mean squat for the bootloader/root/3rd party recovery like TWRP.

    As long as I can get close to AOSP I'm usually OK but Knox and modem flashing shelved me on further Samsung phones. Just a pain and the phoned died due to manufacturer defect anyways so I just won't buy Samsung phones again.

    I'm ranting though I'll stop lol
     
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