***The Official MSI GT83VR Titan SLI Owner's Lounge (NVIDIA GTX-1080's)***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by -=$tR|k3r=-, Aug 13, 2016.

  1. Azunai

    Azunai Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hmm, weird... I can definetly say it's comming from the middle part, not the sides where GPU's are located
     
  2. NuclearLizard

    NuclearLizard Notebook Deity

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    Could be the mobo but I dunno.

    Sent from my LM-Q710.FGN using Tapatalk
     
  3. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    When I watercooled my laptop which allowed the GPUs to run ~250W with the fans basically off, the loud buzz that I heard gave me a real brown pants moment. I guess I'd never heard it before because of 60dBa worth of fans going full blast and closed ear headphones.

    In my P870's case it was easy to identify as it scales with GPU power draw only, it's faint at ~100W if I put my ear right on the keyboard and becomes louder as power draw increases (I have a mod vbios with adjustable power limit). One of my other laptops has a high pitched buzz only when it's running on battery power.

    Technically it's just the inductors vibrating which is what they do, they are just a copper coil encased in resin, there's nothing hi tech about it and the modest loads on inductors in consumer electronics mean failure is basically only ever due to manufacturing defect. People have claimed that adding damping material around the inductor casing helps reduce the noise, I'm going to try adding some hot glue around them to see if that helps when I tear it down soon.
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Depending on the severity of the buzz, covering / encapsulating the offending coil with non-conductive RTV - you want a "globe" around it - acting as a impediment for vibration as well as deadening / vibration absorbing material, with a spread base to help it stick over time. Usually a clear RTV works, I haven't used this particular one - usually use an industrial opaquely labled 3m product, I don't see it on Amazon - but this looks like it fits the specs:

    Clear Electronic Grade Silicone - 2.8 oz Squeeze Tube by ASI
    https://www.amazon.com/Clear-Electronic-Grade-Silicone/dp/B07MKBBQTC

    The specs read as needed, and the comments are good, make sure not to get it on clothes, don't smear it around, and seal the tube well - don't leave the nozzle open to air long or you'll clog it up.
    https://www.amazon.com/Clear-Electr...erType=all_reviews&sortBy=recent&pageNumber=1

    Another good one for electronics:

    Dow Corning 737 Neutral Cure RTV Sealant, Clear, 3 oz. Tube
    https://www.amazon.com/Dow-Corning-Neutral-Sealant-Clear/dp/B00NKYK4OU

    5.0 out of 5 stars the best
    April 11, 2018
    Verified Purchase
    "I use this for almost everything. It's an alcohol cure RTV with both great adhesive properties and good strength and firmness (much better than any caulk you buy at the hardware store). The "neutral cure" bit is about the alcohol cure - rather than acetic acid cure - acetic acid is an etchant for solder, so since this doesn't have that, it's OK to use on electronics."

    This one is also supposed to be non-corrosive and good up to 450F/232C in operation.

    Loctite Superflex RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant 80ml Clear
    https://www.amazon.com/Silicone-Sealant-80mL-Tube-Clear/dp/B0032UW8IW

    Be generous with the coverage, use a pointy tool / spatula to push the material into the coil, make sure to cover it completely with a thick (2mm-3mm at least) shell around it and connect through inside the coil to the board to help mute / absorb vibrations.

    And, let it cure for at least 24 hours, don't power it up, certainly not to high power levels for a couple of days, so that it doesn't break free of the material with vibrations too soon.

    I wouldn't do a bunch of them at once, start with the worst offender / vibration coil and see how it works for you. Maybe practice with the material on something else before applying it to the laptop coil the first time too.

    Please let us know how it works out. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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  5. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    Automotive liquid gasket, thanks for that idea. I have a tube of black permatex in the garage. The MSDS says it is "oxime silicone" which is neutral cure - I will give it a go on the busted 580M I abuse for heatsink mods and soldering alignment :)
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Cool, looks good :)

    Permatex® Ultra Black® Maximum Oil Resistance RTV Silicone Gasket Maker

    SKU: 82180 Category: Ultra Series Gasket Makers
    OEM specified. For dealership warranty requirements, Ultra Black® ensures extended drivetrain warranty compliance. Fast-curing formula. Sensor-safe, low odor, noncorrosive. Meets performance specs of OE silicone gaskets. Retains high flexibility, oil resistant properties through use of a patented adhesion system. Temperature range -65°F to 500°F (-54°C to 260°C) intermittent; resists auto and shop fluids and vibration.
    https://www.permatex.com/products/g...m-oil-resistance-rtv-silicone-gasket-maker-4/

    I like to use the clear silicone made for use with electronics (solder safe) so I can see the component inside - maybe even still read markings - and to see the thickness of the covering. But, if you've got a good substitute on hand, why not give it a try. :)
     
  7. gt83vr6reHelp

    gt83vr6reHelp Notebook Consultant

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    Sorry, I couldn't hear it over my own fan noise mwahahaha :p
     
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  8. Sp00f

    Sp00f Notebook Enthusiast

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    So now my gt83vr is bricked, stuck at MSI logo. Can anyone give me a hand trying to reflash the bios with a programmer and aligator clip or let me know if you have any experience fixing this with USB drive, etc? I cannot consistently boot to windows, happens once in a blue moon and when it does it works fine until it needs a reboot. Right now its just msi logo and no BIOS access with delete key. See post over here http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/gt83vr-sli-1070-boot-stay-at-msi-logo.829264/#post-10928964
     
  9. Kevin@GenTechPC

    Kevin@GenTechPC Company Representative

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    That should be a boot drive issue. Try reinstalling the OS if you can (assuming you have backups), otherwise remove all drives and plug in just one HDD or SSD to verify if you can install a fresh OS on it.
     
  10. Sp00f

    Sp00f Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah I would have agreed except shouldn’t I be able to access the bios if that were the case? Also I removed all drives and still cannot access the bios so I cannot do a clean os install. It sounded a lot like the other thread you were on where it was a bios corruption. I’ve tried booting with just a single stick of ram with no drives etc and still the same. Pressing delete does nothing when booting.

    Could really use some help with this machine. Appreciate the responses


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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