***The Official MSI GT83VR Titan SLI Owner's Lounge (NVIDIA GTX-1080's)***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by -=$tR|k3r=-, Aug 13, 2016.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The SLI 1070 model doesn't need 780w, and it won't use it either - it's hardcoded in the BIOS to only use 230w+230w.

    You'll want to keep using those, and instead buy another pair in case of failure. If one of your 230w's die, you can't use the laptop on AC power. I think you can charge it, but that's it.

    Also the PSU's are locked together via a bridge piece that is a molded plastic so you can't add one or separate them, AFAIK - that could have changed.

    The 780w PSU is very nice, but also probably 2x-3x the cost of 2 230w's. But there have been reports of people using it ok with GT83's. I'd make sure there is a return option in case you get it and want to return it, it's pretty expensive and when you find it doesn't improve / change performance or usability you might not want it.

    Congratulations on your new GT83, awesome machine, I hope you enjoy it :)
     
  2. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 nͫiͤcͫeͤ

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    why not kryonaut on cpu?
     
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  3. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Virtuoso

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    Too many reports of Kryonaut degrading and dryout on laptop CPU's because of intense direct heat in a small area and not enough contact pressure. Had to deal with that myself and the mighty Phoenix dealt with it also. Saw people over on overclock.net also discussing problems with kryonaut drying out. The temps always start out great, but then after awhile, they start rising.

    I don't know how this applies on GT83VR's, but every single GT73VR I've seen posted about always has higher core temps on cores 1 and 3, vs 2 and 4, in some cases, quite a bit higher at large loads and overclocks. Higher core temps are caused by imbalanced heatsink pressure (since the larger side of the heatsink also has to cool the VRM's too. Kryonaut is very bad on imbalanced heatsinks like this).

    The GPU usually has a better fit and more surface area, which is better for Kryonaut.

    Why do you think a 45W CPU winds up running hotter than a 115W GPU so often?
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Kryonaut is fine, if applied well and you don't leave an air gap open - that will oxidize or pump out / dry out almost any enthusiast paste.

    That's why I don't recommend re-pasting any MSI laptop at all, ever.

    It's not needed to keep temps down, what is needed is a simple undervolt of -100mV, that reduces temps at load enough that the hottest core won't thermal throttle, bringing down the performance on all cores.

    If your brand new laptop CPU temperatures can't be dropped by undervolting alone, then return it for another one, most everyone reports good temps by undervolting -100mV (or more!), and happily goes back to gaming or working, or for whatever they bought the laptop in the first place.

    Starting the re-pasting cycle involves craft work that most people don't have, and shouldn't try to gain on their brand new $1000-$4000 laptop, don't practice your first attemps on an expensive laptop, do it on desktops first.

    All the enthusiast pastes need repasting eventually, some in 3-6 months, some in 8-12 months, it depends on your technique.

    I have a refined technique whereby my desktops are running 10 years later after applying paste, and only had to do it one time.

    But, I don't put my desktops in the backpack and swing them around all day. :)

    Laptops have more flexible cooling components and unless you have gained the expertise to know how to apply and reseal the laptop cooling - not so tight it pops - but not so loose it flexs and lets in air to oxidize the paste, you will get far less time between re-pastings.

    Will re-pasting with an enthusiast paste improve the temperatures lower than the stock paste, yes it will - if you do it right, but dropping the temps further than *necessary* to avoid *thermal throttling* is a waste of time for 99% of us.

    Those that like to unlock BIOS power limits will need all the cooling they can get, but that's a very small number of people, and you don't want to become one of them, as it consumes their lives...

    Anyway, keep the stock paste, then you don't have to worry about paste, thermal pads, lapping, bending, and starting constant stream of repasting over the life of the laptop.

    That is unless you prefer doing that to actually using the laptop :)
     
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  5. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 nͫiͤcͫeͤ

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    Usually to minimize this I put a layer of K5 pro around the component perimeter. Lined with kapton tape to prevent messy stuff from happening.

    It's a tradeoff I'm willing to make, opening up every 6 months I consider just regular maintenance.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, I know that, but that will scare off most people that are looking at getting a gaming laptop.

    It's an expensive purchase for most, and a real stretch for the budget.

    To then be told they *must* repaste the laptop, and even worse - void their warranty to hack their laptop BIOS to unlock power limits is over the top for all of them.

    That's why you start them out slow, in gradual steps, getting hwinfo installed to see what the temps are while they are gaming.

    Telling them they can reduce the higher temps by undervolting - picking on value that most everyone can attain - -100mV - and then they see a 10c drop at load, and are very happy, and most go away at that point - they solved their problem. End of time wasting for them.

    To try to draw those people in to tearing apart their brand new laptops, voiding their warranty, and possibly painting themselves into a DIY corner - ending up with a basket case - or worse temps after a few repasting try's, is just not a nice thing to do to people.

    They don't need us to force re-pasting, hacked BIOS's, vbio's, and OC'ing on everyone. Those newbies don't know much if anything when coming in asking questions, so they can easily get sucked into doing far more than they really need to do. I think it's uncool to lead those people on instead of helping them quickly get what they need, and get them into wasting far more time than they need to.

    Keep it simple and get them in and out and back to what they love doing, whatever they bought the laptop for in the first place.

    If they read up on all the other tuning stuff and want to do it, they will read and try it on their own, and ask questions when they want to know more.

    Otherwise, get them monitoring their temps, undervolted, and back to their lives.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
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  7. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 nͫiͤcͫeͤ

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    Agreed here.

    Many here are casuals plebs, that combined with (relatively) okay MSi initial QC on these laptops are enough to satisfy most people. (can't say the same on the retarded dell/alienware counterparts though)

    Time will come for these people to get into DIY+enthusiast realm. Their hardware has the headroom / potential to do that.
     
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Exactly, let them set the pace.

    You wouldn't go into a car service shop and expect to get the mechanic to recommend swapping your engine or replacing other parts that weren't part of the original purpose of the service visit. There are laws against that.

    Being the holders of expertise, we have the responsibility to tune our responses to the audience, and provide interaction that will usually stop far from the limits of our capabilities, because it's all about what the newbie's expertise limits are, not showing off our own masterful potentials. :)
     
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  9. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 nͫiͤcͫeͤ

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    But then again there's systems designed with such retardedness, repasting / modding is the only solution.
     
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  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Don't buy them, or return them if you got an unusally bad one. Or, don't push them beyond their design limits, requiring hacking the hardware to meet the increased power demands.

    It's all very simple really. Don't break what works, and use it as intended.

    The GT73 Pro-866 7820HK 1080 I tuned runs at 4.5ghz + DGC GPU OC on stock paste, running Prime 95, with only a little undervolt - higher undervolt available at stock or lower OC speeds.

    Some units may not clock as high on stock paste and undervolt, some might go a little higher. Tune OC for the hardware abilities out of the box, and that will be more than it had out of the box. And, out of the box it kicks ass on games already.

    It's possible to use a laptop as design intended, and have complete and utter joy in it's use. Really it is. And, most people do this without even a single thought that they are missing out on anything, because they are happy with the performance they bought.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
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