***The Official MSI GT80 Titan Owner's Lounge***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by -=$tR|k3r=-, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. zipperi

    zipperi Notebook Evangelist

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    I did earlier use Laplink PCmover http://web.laplink.com/pcmover_feature_overview/ - it works well but it isn't free.
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I use it as an imaging tool to backup whole partitions, and it's got compression - plus it doesn't backup empty space - so it's not demanding on storage, but the images can get large - or multiple.

    The paid version (only?) does incremental backup's, not sure how that works, as I don't use it, but it sounds like what you might want.

    I keep 1 original OEM image, and then 1 image most recently done, and depending on space or interest in between versions I'll rotate 3 image's back, dropping the oldest when I create a new one. I'll also save an archive like when I drop a laptop for a new one, or when I take it offline for a while pulling the upgraded storage.

    It's pretty easy to backup folders and files by drag and drop though, so don't count that out :)
     
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  3. stank0

    stank0 Notebook Consultant

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    That isn't a problem. What I'm concerned about are installed programs. Many of these are paid for and registered a loooong time ago (with multiple updates) and I'm not even sure that I will be able to find the registration info and keys.
     
  4. zipperi

    zipperi Notebook Evangelist

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    Do use some key finder utility - there are several free ones.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    In that case you *do* want to use the full partition/drive image backup, as it will resize to fit your new larger drive and restore a working full bootable Windows with apps already installed.

    If you have programs installed on other than the C drive, then image backup the other drive/partitions and restore using the same Letter drive on the new computer.

    If there is anything you don't want backed up / restored - large programs you don't want on the new computer or Steam games you can re-download later as you want them again, uninstall / clean your drive(s) before you backup.

    It's tough for a backup program to backup an application in toto and restore it to a new system install - all the registry entries and dll's and app installed will not quite match on a clean Windows install, it's better to do a full system backup and restore / resize on the new system, then do a Windows Update to download / install new drivers for new hardware - and / or install drivers downloaded from the new laptop support area as part of the spin up after booting on the restored image on the new machine.
    That's a good idea too, to find all the "lost" key's, so you could do a reinstall should the situation arise; or just dig up the boxes/manuals and scan in the license info and keep it digitally backed up for future use.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
  6. stank0

    stank0 Notebook Consultant

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    Yes! That's what's I was afraid you'd say and that's what the point of my original question. I'm not following IT tech progress anymore as I was before, but I knew, there was nothing to be able to parse all the .inis, .regs and .dlls successfully. Heck, even genuine uninstall utilities from the software creators won't even remove everything that was installed by their software, so I was kinda naive to even think that they would come up with an utility to be able to migrate the whole software environment onto a clean windows installation.
    I don't want to do a whole system restore, because that would restore my old windows installation, which is, after almost two years pretty "dirty" and doesn't run optimally anymore.
    Then there is a problem restoring my old windows on a different hardware. Not sure whether that would go smoothly as well even though the changes aren't that significant and windows *should* be able to deal with it just fine. But... With these things, one never knows.
    So i will do the whole reinstall song and dance I used to do many times in the past.
    The keyfinder thing is a great idea and I will look into it. Thanks.
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That's a bit of a myth, that as a Windows install ages it's worth less and less. I've got a few that are going on 10 years old, and I keep them tuned up and cleaned up and they run just like they were when first installed and configured with applications.

    Of course I don't install crazy things, and I check the disk integrity every time I do an improper shutdown, few crashes occur but I also check the disk then too, and occasionally it does a fix.

    I use DDU to clean up video driver installs too.

    And, with Windows Update it installs what's missing.

    IDK about Windows 10 though, I think there are versions old enough that Windows won't update them, right? So you'd have to reinstall to "catch up" to the current fork "major update".

    It's worth a try to image it and restore it on the new machine - but first backup the OEM image on the new laptop so you can restore to it as a base for starting fresh later - or RMA or eventual sale.

    That way you don't need to spend hours re-installing everything. :)
     
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  8. stank0

    stank0 Notebook Consultant

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    Sure. If you take care of your car, it'll run forever. I never even change oil. LOL
    I can't be bothered cleaning windows or do checkcisk and it definitely boots up slower than it used to.
    I'm beginning to look forward to slim it down to barebones. I've got quite a few programs installed that I never use, but that I hesitate to uninstall because "what if I needed them" :D
     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    ccleaner and other system management tools will help a great deal.

    If you've never have used them, you probably have 10's of GB's of useless cruft hanging around slowing everything down, including browsing.

    It really doesn't take much time to run ccleaner / ccenhancer or the occasional disk check at boot - scheduling it upon boot after an incident that might have caused a problem.

    It lets me have continuity over many years, eliminates crashes from corrupt disk files, and all that contentious effort puts me in touch with what's going on with my computer.
     
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  10. stank0

    stank0 Notebook Consultant

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    Yeah ,I did use CCleaner before, but then there were versions of it infected with malware so I stayed away ever since since I don't use any antivirus besides the built-in one. That was quite a while ago . Maybe I should give it another shot
     
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