The Official MSI GT76 Titan Owners and Discussions Lounge

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by joskei, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. robsternation

    robsternation Notebook Enthusiast

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    I don't think this is quite right. Please see the following video from GamersNexus:



    The chart at 6:55 shows temp results of delidding vs. solder, with discussion both before and after by Steve.

    In a nutshell, the chart shows that the delid achieves about a 4 degrees C decrease in temps vs. solder, which I am assuming is what you are referring to when you say that the difference is not massive. But this is where relying on the numbers alone without context can be highly misleading.

    First, a 4 degrees difference even on its face is significant, inasmuch as the difference between solder and paste in a 9900k is only about 5 degrees, and Intel evidently believed that 5 degrees was well worth the effort of switching to solder to achieve.

    Second, Steve openly admits that they are amateurs/inexperienced at delidding a 9900k CPU, which is a different (a far more difficult, and risky) kettle of fish than delidding a previous generation chip like the 8700k. He is very open about the fact that someone more technically proficient at it, e.g. der8auer, can achieve much better results, and in fact der8auer has gotten decreases of something like 10 degrees C, or more.

    If you add together the decreases in temps from delidding and the solder (10 and 5), you will have essentially reconstituted the 15-20 degrees decreases that were achieved in delidding/LM of previous gen chips, and this should make theoretical sense.

    Steve pretty much acknowledges all of this in the video. It's applied science, after all. When he says that he doesn't recommend that most people do this, it is not because delidding/LM cannot achieve very significant decreases vs. solder (again, he admits it can be on the order of 10 degrees C), it's because:

    -delidding a 9900k properly, so that you get the desired results, while averting potential disaster such as completely trashing the expensive CPU, is something that most of of his enthusiast viewers will not have the skills/patience/confidence/risk-appetite to try. In fact, his own semi-comical ham-handedness in attempting it is one of his arguments for not recommending it to his viewers, as his efforts are likely to be pretty much representative of the efforts of his audience, lol.

    -in conjunction with this, he makes the argument from pragmatism: all Intel CPUs "work" out of the box. They may not have ideal or even desirable temps, but they usually won't blow up or melt down. The risk-plus-effort vs. reward equation, in other words, is in most cases not going to favor trying this at home.

    But as others such as der8auer have shown (you can see his Youtube analyses on this), trying to run the 9900k on a continuous basis at 5GHz is going to get you some really high temps, possibly to the point of throttling or shut down. Which begs the question: if you are not trying to achieve high clocks (and at the very least Intel's advertised speeds of 5GHz), why would someone even buy the 9900k in the first place?



    -I agree with GamersNexus' analysis. In fact, when the 9900k first came out, I was very leery of even considering buying it for a desktop, because it made no sense to buy the 9900k if I didn't want to achieve at least 5GHz clock speeds, and based on the reviews by der8auer and others, the prospect of delidding it myself at home made my hairs stand on end.

    -Fortunately for me, I don't have to do it myself, as professional delidding is now being offered for the 9900k at affordable prices. It really comes down to this: if someone was inclined to see the significant drops in temperatures from a well-done delidding as valuable before the 9900k, then one will continue to view the (still) significant temperature drops from a well-done delidding of the 9900k as valuable now. Conversely, if you didn't then, then you won't now. The only real difference is that most of us can't do it at home anymore, and have to get it done professionally.

    I certainly respect everyone's prerogative to make their own judgment for themselves; as stated previously, everyone's priorities and expectations are different, so it's a reasonable difference of opinion. But I thought it was important to state the facts clearly.
     
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  2. Donald@HIDevolution

    Donald@HIDevolution Company Representative

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    The first shipment has arrived...but is almost sold out already.
     
  3. Kevin

    Kevin Egregious

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    Going by the GT73 and GT75, I will be totally shocked when this laptop is never advertised as having G-Sync, yet it eventually has G-Sync all the same.

    To this day you don't see a single mention of G-Sync in MSI materials for either of those machines, but they have it.
     
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  4. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    @JeanLegi @ryzeki Weren't all of the reviewed units all pre-release versions?
    I wonder if Optimus can be simply disabled in the unlocked bios?
     
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  5. Stephen1892

    Stephen1892 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I hope you're right as I'm wanting to upgrade my gt73vr 7rf to a gt76 and Gsync is Something I'm not wanting to give up
     
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  6. robsternation

    robsternation Notebook Enthusiast

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    I really hope that past is prologue in this particular case.
     
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  7. JeanLegi

    JeanLegi Notebook Evangelist

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    so far i don't know if optimus can be disabled in bios.
    i never find something else in the bios options of the gs63vr 6rf.
    i know only for notebookcheck that they use a prerelase-version of the GT76 but the MSI technician i talk to had a final GT76 in use during our conversation and he confirm that the GT76 has optimus and this means no g-sync.
     
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  8. robsternation

    robsternation Notebook Enthusiast

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    I just got a message from Donald at HIDe, and he is now telling me that he was mistaken, and that the GT76 does indeed have Optimus. Since this is the result of their inspection of their newly arrived retail stock, this is definitive.

    However, he is saying that one can select the RTX 2080 and lock it in for any application by going into the NVIDIA settings (I presume this would be in the Program Settings where you can pull up the full list of individual applications on your laptop).

    Since I have no experience with either Optimus or the RTX 2080, can anyone else confirm that this workaround is indeed the case?

    (Also, thanks for the heads-up on this issue.)
     
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  9. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    So these days there isnt a PEG or dGPU mode anymore eh?
     
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  10. Kevin

    Kevin Egregious

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    Well it has Optimus so forget what I said. What was MSI thinking? Why drop the MUX setup. A DTR with Optimus is an oxymoron.

    This laptop is dead to me. If they EOL the GT75 I'll have to move to another brand when it's time to upgrade.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2019
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