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Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Ultra Male, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Maybe I will replace the TIM on the CPU with a 3mm thermal pad..... I am concerned for your PC.... Thermal paste should not be applied on VRM components (Google for an explanation as to why). Also, the VRM (Voltage Regulation Module) is a combination of components. So to "apply it on the VRM" is the same as saying you frosted part of the motherboard with thermal paste.

    I am not surprised it dried out being that it was likely exposed to air.

    Sent from my HTC 2PS6200 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
  2. Semmy

    Semmy Notebook Consultant

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    Yes you are right. But the fact is that if i put a thermal padding in that place, then my processor will not be in full contact with the heat sink. And I will have a big difference in the cores 10+ degrees. And possibly throttling.

    Other users also said that the MX-4 dries quickly on the processor. The quality of this thermal paste and thermal conductivity is worse than that of the GELID GC extreme.
     
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  3. captaincranium

    captaincranium Notebook Consultant

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    Take it for what its worth @Pureownuge69 but with a few of my other MSI laptops I have always repasted with Gelid Extreme and it has always worked great. Seems to last a good while and doesn't dry out quick and is a good combo of quality + results. Plus it is a thicker paste so seemed good for any uneven plates, etc. Wish i was more comfortable with Liquid Metal pasting myself because I am very pleased with the results of my GT63 that HIDevolution liquid metal repasted and they also replaced the thermal pads as well. I would LM my others too if i didn't think I would do more harm than good. lol
     
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  4. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Thank you all for the input @Semmy and @captaincranium :) I will give GELID GC Extreme a go this time as opposed to the MX-4. Will be sure to provide an update and some screenshots when it is done. Although I am confident that I would be able to successfully apply liquid metal TIM (and coat the SMDs in a protective layer), I don't believe the risk is worth the return.
     
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  5. Shark00n

    Shark00n Notebook Deity

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    It's not really.
    I did it and it was more of a hassle than it was worth.
    Heatsink contact is not great, there's not a ton of pressure.
    Temps improved but not by much. GPU still reached 90C while gaming. CPU still power-throttled and maintained a 3.6Ghz boost at 45W. (around 82-85C)
    Maybe the fans were a bit quieter but didn't really notice it that much.

    Undervolt, nice thicc paste, maybe repading to make sure everything is making the best possible contact. That's the way to go I think.
    HIDEvolution's bottom cover with the fan cutouts also gave me a much appreciated boost in cooling potential. Now the GPS finally drops under 90C and gets to 87 ish tops. Big improvement there. Better temps and more boost for longer.
    Can't say it's how the notebook was designed. Maybe the fans don't have cutouts for some other reason (airflow around SSD or other components) so pairing it with a cooling base is a good idea.
     
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  6. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Hi @Agatio and welcome to the forum. Before I proceed with the explanation, please note that the removal of your laptop heat sink and reapplication of thermal interface material (TIM) is considered an advanced procedure by MSI and in a majority of cases results in your warranty being void. It is also worth noting that this may vary depending on the country. As such, I would advise getting in contact with your local MSI service center to confirm.

    In regard to setting up and using an ESD mat and wristband, there is a variety of guides available that can be found with a quick Google Search. I have linked a few below for you:

    Guide 1
    Guide 2

    I personally do not use an ESD wristband or ESD mat, but rather ESD knitted protection gloves.

    Now onto the disassembly :) . I would advise researching the disassembly procedure for the GT62VR. Although it is not the same model, it has a very similar internal layout owing to it having a near identical chassis to the GT63 8RG. The linked guide is only for reference as to what can be expected. For more specific information, below is the order in which I disassembled mine.

    1. Remove the base plate secured to the chassis by 6 screws.
    2. Once the base plate is removed, disconnect the battery and remove it from the chassis, flip the laptop over and press the power button a couple of times. This will ensure that all components (e.g. capacitors) in the laptop are discharged.
    3. Flip the laptop over again and proceed with removing both the CPU and GPU fan (each secured by 3 screws).
    4. With both fans removed, you can then take out the RAM (if there is any installed in the exposed slots), M.2 NVMe SSD, and HDD. It is worth mentioning that you only really need to remove the HDD (adjacent to the battery) as it is secured (via 2 screws) to the mid-frame that will need to be removed next. I just remove all these components for piece of mind and I consider it to be best practice.
    5. Now on to the mid-frame :) . Note that removing the mid-frame is not required to remove the heat-sink. It does however make it considerably easier to re-seat the heat-sink after application of new TIM. If you would rather not remove the mid frame, skip to step 7. If you wish to proceed, remove each of the screws as per the image below. csm_DSC_0409_watermarked_025b79af85_marked.jpg
    6. Gently, begin to separate the mid frame from the remaining case. Start from the back of the laptop (near the heat-sink exhaust ports) and work your way around the left hand side (with the sub woofer) to the front of the laptop and then eventually the right side. Be careful as the audio jacks on the right side can be a bit tricky.
    7. Once you have removed the mid frame, you are now ready to remove the heat-sink. Begin loosening and removing the screws progressively, starting with the screws that are not numbered first. For the numbered screws, loosen them in descending numerical order (i.e. start with the screw labelled 4, then loosen 3, then 2 and then 1). I do one full rotation of the screw driver for each screw using this pattern until they are all removed (i.e. 4,3, 2, 1, 4, 3, 2, 1 etc.) This is just so the heat sink separates from the CPU and GPU dies with equal pressure.

    The heat sink will likely not lift off easily and will be glued down by the factory installed TIM. As opposed to lifting directly up, I very gently rotate the heat sink a few degrees left and right to loosen the TIM up whilst pulling up gently. If you really struggle, get a hair dryer and apply some heat to the heat sink from a distance. Keep in mind that the increased movement of air can cause a build up of static electricity (you have been warned), but it can make the process significantly easier and aid with loosening up the TIM and thermal pads. I have used this method a few times and it has never cause me any issues. Better than ripping out some of the memory chips on your GPU :p

    Hope this quick rough guide helps :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2018
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  7. Agatio

    Agatio Newbie

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    Thanks for writing this. It would have been helpful if I wasn't so impatient that I already went in and did it with no instructions :D Well at least there will be more new people who are reading this and might want to do this operation.

    The only differences I had in my process were that I forgot to press the power button after removing the battery. I remembered that it might have been a good thing to do after I was already done with everything. I got lucky and nothing broke, at least yet.

    I was also able to replace the HDD to an SSD and remove the heatsink without removing the mid frame. I was trying to get it off and then noticed that I don't have to.

    I think my temps went down about 5-10 degrees. I'm not entirely sure since my benchmarks before and after are not exactly the same.
     
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  8. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    No worries at all. I'm glad it went well for you. :) Yes, removal of the Midframe isn't a necessity, just makes it a little easier (and cleaner) when removing and re-seating the heatsink. Might add this as an aside note for any future readers.

    The main thing is that you got it all back together successfully (and with some gains :D) . Pressing the power button after disconnecting the power source has became a habit and saved me a few times (primarily when working on desktop power supplies or devices with exposed PSUs ). It is considered best practice when dismantling or working on any electronic device.

    Sent from my HTC 2PS6200 using Tapatalk
     
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  9. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    In addition to my last post, I forgot to add that it may be a good idea to clone the HDD to your SSD as opposed to just replacing it. The HDD installed from the factory has a recovery partition that enables you to install a fresh copy of the factory MSI Windows Image in the event you run into any issues.

    If you decided to clone, I would highly recommend EaseUS Todo Backup (Home). It is a relatively cheap and renouned solution, offering a variety of great features and functionality.

    Sent from my HTC 2PS6200 using Tapatalk
     
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  10. Agatio

    Agatio Newbie

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    I'll try to remember that next time, and if I'll ever need to recover the Windows, I could always just put the original HDD back in for that.

    One thing I'm wondering is that was it a good idea to tighten both heatsinks screws as tight as possible? Can they break anything like that or should I loosen them just a bit?
     
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