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Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Spartan, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. JNogueira

    JNogueira Notebook Geek

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    Hi @ldcosta ,

    The permanent speed of 3.9Ghz will remain as long as the TDP will not go over 45W for more than 1 minute. Otherwise TDP Power Limit will kick in.
    With Gaming, this will happen rarely, and UV will also help to keep the CPU cooler.

    This is why I din't go for the TDP unlock hack.

    If MSI is able to do something like Acer did, then that would be just outstanding.
     
  2. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Prime 95 (Blended Torture Test) + Unigine Valley (1440p | 8x MSAA | Ultra) - I run the combined stress test for approx 5 minutes to determine max thermals. For stability testing, 30 minutes in the combined stress test. If it passes without errors/crashes, I will proceed to play games for a few hours. I can usually recognize instability well in advance by paying attention to fluidity and frame time inconsistencies. I have also noticed that the graphics tests in the Userbenchmark app will stutter in the event of GPU instability for me. Do not run MSI Afterburner in the background during these tests! You will notice hitching that coincides with the polling interval set in MSI AB as it interrupts the GPU to gather data on key operating metrics.

    In regards to CPU under-volting, I use Throttlestop with stock BIOS (-130mv). For a quick reference, an unstable CPU undervolt usually manifests itself through errors when running TS Bench (1024M) or intermittent freezing during the test. If it passes in TS Bench, I then move on to testing either in-game or via bench marking applications for comparison with previous runs. If anything is wrong, results will be out of the expected margin for error. This takes quite a bit of time and analysis though.

    Looking forwards to seeing your CPU core temperature differentials. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
  3. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Did you encounter any issues with your under-volt not sticking after a system restart? I have been using Throttlestop purely because my CPU voltage configurations would always revert back to stock on restart.
     
  4. ldcosta

    ldcosta Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yes I noticed that on Intel XTU after restart I had to load the profile saved and apply it again(wait for na update maybe)! (I didn't had that issue using Intel XTU on my asus GL551JM)
    For now I can play games for about 3/4hours (tested last night) without crashes with UV -0.150mV, don't know if I can go lower... but no throttle issues of anykind.

    About GPU GTX1080 I couldn't change the Voltage on this card, probably need to change vBios?! (didn't explore it yet so I could make it run cooler)

    I think the heating problem now during gameplay is the GPU not de CPU atm (and 3700rpm on coolers all the time will not last long (I think!))
    I didn't like the advance mode on coolers on DC 2.0, I don't see the temperature in ºC only in % ?! But I didn't had time to did more tests and investigate more...

    Maybe I'lll keep the stock BIOS and undervolt only de CPU for now and I'll try to tweak the GPU now.
    Before I went to sleep I tested +200Mhz +200Mhz but GTA V freezed after that...
     
  5. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    To modify GPU voltage, you can use MSI Afterburner. You will need to make some configurations prior to voltage monitoring and configuration becoming available in the application though. Follow the steps provided below.

    ENABLE VOLTAGE CONTROL "FIX"

    Step 1: Go to your MSI Afterburner Profiles folder (C:\Program Files (x86)\MSI Afterburner\Profiles)
    Step 2: Right-click the file named "VEN_10DE&DEV..." and go > Properties > Security
    Step 3: Select "Edit" and then click on "Users (username\Users)" and with the permission boxes below, check "Allow" for the first box - Full control. Click OK and OK again (this allows the file to be saved after editing it).
    Step 4: Now you can open the file named "VEN_10DE&DEV..." in WordPad and replace everything you see with this:


    [Startup]
    Format=2
    CoreVoltageBoost=
    PowerLimit=
    ThermalLimit=
    ThermalPrioritize=
    CoreClkBoost=
    MemClkBoost=
    [Settings]
    VDDC_Generic_Detection=1



    Step 5: Save the file and restart MSI Afterburner
    Step 6: Go into MSI Afterburner settings and check the boxes under General > "Unlock voltage control" (select "third party" from the drop down) and "Unlock voltage monitoring" then click OK and restart Afterburner.

    Once you have completed the above steps and MSI AB has restarted, you should notice that your GPUs current voltage is displayed. Now you can set a custom Frequency/Voltage curve.

    All credit for the above steps goes to Dreamonic :)
     
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  6. ldcosta

    ldcosta Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you! I'll check it out latter! I'll need to learn abou the curve method, usually I just set the value of OC and change the rpm based on temps, I think it cannot be done in DC 2.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018
  7. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    This doesn't work on PASCAL MXM cards.
    Yes you can monitor the GPU voltage AND the slider appears but the slider does absolutely nothing.
     
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  8. Shark00n

    Shark00n Notebook Deity

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    Be sure to share your frequency/voltage curves! I’m quite interested in that as the GPU is the only thing I can’t quite keep under control. It’s always at 90C even with liquid metal.


    Oh, nevermind. Thanks Falkentyne.

    I’ll probably open her up again soon to replace the LM on the GPU for some kryonaut or phobya nanogrease. Really see no big benefits of LM application. Temps are the same but it does boost slightly higher.

    Although I have foam dams and took every precaution it’s still double the risk for no gains. On the CPU it’s worth it though as temps dropped way more.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018
  9. Pureownuge69

    Pureownuge69 Notebook Geek

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    Um... actually yes it does. I would not have posted it if I could not do it myself.
    upload_2018-11-14_7-18-29.png

    You don't use the voltage slider. You set a custom voltage/ frequency curve.... There is also plenty of videos that demonstrate the process of doing so.



    I have had my I am currntly running mine at 1850Mhz on Core @ (0.95v | 950mv) + 150 Mhz on Memory Clock. I will post a picture of my custom curve when I get a chance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018
  10. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Good for you. Mine's running at 1.062v @ 2050 mhz at 230W TDP.

    Please read what I said again.

    I'm one of the first people to do that edit that was mentioned. Everyone here knows about the curves now. I said that GPU VOLTAGE is NOT adjustable. It's capped at 1.062v maximum, even if the slider is set to +100mv. On desktop cards, this would allow +1.162v. Pascal MXM is completely locked by the vbios. No one has found out how to bypass this here.

    Nowhere was I referring to the curves.
     
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