*** The Official MSI GE75 Raider Owners and Discussions Lounge ***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Spartan, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    Hey awsan, Malaysian here as well.

    Been very happy with my LM repaste on my GS75 for since July.

    I'm not sure how HIDEvolution's liquid metal repasting process goes but i plated my heatsinks with liquid metal first, let the copper absorb the gallium, clean off the dry indium and tin, then apply a sufficient amount of liquid metal. I did this as a precautionary step against the liquid metal drying up too quickly. The "chipping" you see on the heatsinks could be the leftover dry indium and tin after the gallium was absorbed into the heatsink. The heatsink itself is fine.

    Now about the liquid metal spills, you can easily get them off with some cotton buds and alcohol. But if HIDevolution already coated the surrounding smds with a non-conductive barrier (Ie : clear nail polish) AS THEY SHOULD , then it shouldnt be a problem. If not, good luck.

    Concerning the foam dams, i remember it took me 5-6 hours and many sponges to get it just the right thickness across the entire dam, but then again, i only had an xacto knife. I thought HIDevolution would have a specialised tool of some sort to make their foam dams quickly and perfectly. Guess i was wrong.

    One thing I am concerned about are those cpu temps. They should not be that high at all. My GS75 only runs the cpu at 80°C while gaming and that is with the imon slope tweak so that it runs at 4ghz all core. Not to mention that the GE75 has a much beefier heatsink compared to the GS75. The gpu on the other hand is running about as expected. Yours IS a 115w gpu compared to my 90w gpu after all. That and the gpu isnt as picky about the thermal interface material. Going from stock paste to liquid metal only netted me a 2°C temp reduction.
     
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  2. awsan

    awsan Notebook Consultant

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    Forgive me for getting into the point directly but if I may ask:
    1- how did you clean the heat sink? just alcohol and arm grease or something hard and chip it ?

    2- Just putting alcohol on Q-tips will be enough to clean the liquid metal with out making it run around?

    3-How did you manage to level the damn? what do you recommend me to do and what height should I aim for?

    4-Which clear nail polish did you use that will handle 100+ degrees with out liquefying again?

    Thanks
     
  3. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    1. For cleaning up JUST the gallium and tin residue, I used a dry Q-tip.

    2. Roll it on the Q-tip

    3. Trial and error. Just slowly slicing it until I get it right. I used 2mm thickmess but it depends on how high the die relative to the surface you're sticking the foam to. You want it to be the same height as the surface of the die


    4. It doesn't get that hot. 70-80°C maybe but not 100+
     
  4. martin778

    martin778 Notebook Consultant

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    I was wondering, are the stock thermal pads reusable? I have some Mastergel Maker still laying around that I could put to a good use but I have no spare thermal pads.
     
  5. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    They come with paste on the Vrms and memory instead of thermal pads if I'm not mistaken so you'll need to get thermal pads as well. 0.5mm for gddr6 and 1mm for everything else.
     
  6. martin778

    martin778 Notebook Consultant

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    Not touching that then. Weirdly configured notebook though, at stock the CPU is constantly bouncing from 95*C power limit and undervolting only makes the clock higher rather than lowering temps.
    Limiting the all-core boost to x35-36 in Throttlestop makes the temps manageable but still in the mid-high 80's when playing the latest GRID.
     
  7. Ocmersh

    Ocmersh Notebook Enthusiast

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    That's surprising coming from HID evolution. They pride themselves in their LM application. I actually got LM aswell but went with GenTech PC. Hope your able to work everything out friend.

    Honestly it may be best for you to do some kryonaut thermal paste(non conductive). Its the best non-conductive paste in my opinion.
     
  8. Kevin

    Kevin Egregious

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    Those liquid metal pics need a NSFW warning. Yikes.

    I will stick with my Kryonaut.

    I agree with everything you said, other than Ampere being a mere 20% jump over Turing. The shrink to 7nm will bring much larger dividends, more likely in the 40% performance range. You need look no further than what 7nm has done for AMD, where their mid-range cards (RX 480/580/590) went from battling the GTX 1060 to now (RX 5700 series) sparring with the upper end RTX cards. The 5700 XT is exactly 41% faster than the RX 590 at 1080p, 42% at 1440p and 4K. There's pretty much no way Nvidia doesn't see such gains.

    Waiting nearly a year is a mother though, it's easier said than done. I am in the final decision process of acquiring an RTX 2080 equipped GE75 within the week myself, just with the i7-9750H instead. I want the 9880H badly, I just don't think its $900 premium can be recouped if I decide to sell the laptop in a year.

    On the topic of the octo-cores, I have a strong feeling that Intel's 9750H successor in the 10-series is going to be an 8 core/8 thread CPU. If I want 8 cores right now, I will probably target the GT76 DT-90, which has the i7-9700K/RTX 2080 and can be had these days for around $2700.
     
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  9. martin778

    martin778 Notebook Consultant

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    I don't believe they will make 8C/16T popular in laptops. 9750h is already unsuitable, the TDP is too high for a laptop and the poor thing throttles to oblivion. 95-98*C on stock and even in games is insanity.
    I suppose Area 51m could work with 9750h but stuff like a Zephyrus, GP, GL, GS or even te GE? Nah. Especially not if the GPU heatpipes are linked to the cpu heatsink.

    There is one 8C CPU that would work in a laptop and that would be anything Zen2 based, 7nm. 2.5-2.7GHz base and 3.5-3.7GHz boost.

    At the moment 7700HQ or the 7820/6820HK equivalent is the maximum what I'd put in a gaming laptop. My ASUS runs 70-73*C in Aida64 stress test with -120mV undervolt and LM - perfect, absolutely OK for a gaming notebook but 90-98*C with the 9750H is not okay, not sure what MSI is doing but with the MSI the clock rises a lot when you lower the voltage so undervolting itself doesn't do much if you don't cut the TDP down.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2019
  10. Ocmersh

    Ocmersh Notebook Enthusiast

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    A process shrink does not promise a massive performance boost. Remember the 5960x? That was built on the 22nm process. 3700x is 7nm and is roughly 5% faster. I know they are two different chips.. but still. We will see. In either case.
     
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