<<< The "Official" CF-30 Thread >>>

Discussion in 'Panasonic' started by Toughbook, Jun 24, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Rob

    Rob Toughbook Aficionado

    Reputations:
    450
    Messages:
    4,037
    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Sweet... thanks for that info :)
     
  2. ZeroFlight

    ZeroFlight Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    81
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    All of these posts have some really good info but some of it is spaced a bit so to try to sum up again (sorry TB you had most of it but missed a couple of things :) ):

    28s had 5 different keyboards officially
    1: White standard chicklet with white connectors holding down the keys
    2: White standard chicklet with black connectors holding down the keys (pretty much the same as #1 but technically different)
    3: Rubberized backlit - only 2 cables so doesn't need any special hardware; forward compatible with 29s and 30s though I wouldn't recommend it if you have another option
    4: Electroluminscent - also known as the black chicklet backlit; characterized by keys getting really sensitive; requires an inverter board on a 28
    5: Emissive backlit - the factory decided #4 sucked and started replacing it with this about 2 years ago; 28s never shipped from the factory with this keyboard; characterized by a block of grey plastic with square holes for keys to sit in (like mini-frames) so technically not a chicklet style; requires a different inverter board than #4 on a 28

    29s & 30s have the same 3
    1: Black standard chicklet - no special notes
    2: Rubberized backlit - 3 cables; backlight doesn't work on 28s that I know of but keys do
    3: Emissive - Same as #5 on the 28s except it doesn't need the inverter board because hardware is built-in

    Each of the keyboards have slight variations such as a particular key being red and whatnot. As TB pointed out, there were a few different versions of the 28 rubberized for various reasons (such as one version actually being left-overs from the 27s).

    The emissives have the most non-obvious variations and while they all do the same things in the same way, it's a matter of quality. For unknown reasons, the 30 emissive keyboards have a major problem with keys stopping working or doubling up like TB's problem (which usually is the first symptom before going bad). Whether that's a problem with the keyboard or with the 30 is unknown at this time since the 30 emissives haven't been put into 29s on a large enough scale to tell, though I get the feeling its the keyboard.

    Special features like backlights aside, all of the keyboard themselves can handle a lot of liquid; the problem is the liquid going underneath. The 28, 29, and 30 each have pretty good sealed panels covering the cables - providing all of the screws are in place - so a little spill here and there shouldn't be a problem with any of them. Rubberized are easier to shoot with a little Windex & wipe off but the rubber does get old & die over time. They're also pretty easy to tear if you poke 'em with a stick. The 28 and 29 rubberized boards have been tearing with minimal effort/wear while the 30 boards haven't (from my own observations) yet. That is probably due to the different rubber formulas. Compare them side-by-side and you'll be able to tell a big difference. The emissive is the most sturdy of the boards because of the shock it can take without losing too many (if any) keys. The catch is that it's also the hardest to clean out sticky liquids like coffee or pop (that's not to say it's difficult, just the most of the 3 main styles) as well as being pretty difficult to replace lost/missing keys. The standard takes the middle ground by being pretty easy to clean and can take some abuse but if something hits it at the right angle keys will go flying. That being said, those keys are easy to replace individually from a scrap board.

    That should cover the majority of the main thoughts on keyboards. I've left off a lot of the nitty gritty detail that makes this forum a wealth of info (such as tough-2-go's explanation) but that's because this was meant to be an overview of types & what makes them different on a basic level.
     
  3. 48user

    48user Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    thanks guys for all the keyboard insight.
     
  4. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

    Reputations:
    1,267
    Messages:
    7,337
    Likes Received:
    355
    Trophy Points:
    251
    Zero... As usual... Excellent post! Thank you!

    I am having issues with the brand new keyboard already. When I first got it I was surprised that it didn't double skip like the old one did. I'm with you... I think it is the keyboard. I find myself consciously making sure that I hit a certain key twice AND with enough force to make sure it registers a hit... But most of the time it doesn't. The only way I can make sure I can get every key is to type so S L O W L Y that it is sure to register. But I guess that is what spell check is for.

    If I call Panasonic if/when it gets worse... Would they send me out a new keyboard or make me send it in to Heartland. (Out of curiousity)
     
  5. ZeroFlight

    ZeroFlight Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    81
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    No clue whether they'd do a priority exchange on a keyboard but it's worth a shot as long as you don't have to pay for the shipping.
     
  6. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

    Reputations:
    1,267
    Messages:
    7,337
    Likes Received:
    355
    Trophy Points:
    251
    I may want to call them and check about my warranty first. If they show it as a 90 day warranty I may want to do it. If they say 3 years I may wait...

    Thanks! ;)
     
  7. Toyo

    Toyo Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    305
    Messages:
    1,260
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    66
    I don't know why I keep saying Non Emmissive. Panasonic's site calls mine a Plastic Emmissive Keyboard.

    The only complaint I have is the non ability to tell if you have turned the KB lights off. I hate to have them burning during the day when I don't need it. Or am I worrying for nothing?

    Thanks to all of you for explaining the KB info!
     
  8. Toughbook

    Toughbook Drop and Give Me 20!

    Reputations:
    1,267
    Messages:
    7,337
    Likes Received:
    355
    Trophy Points:
    251
    I wouldn't worry about it. They are LEDs so the lifetime is probably 100,000 hours or something like that. I keep mine on #2 pretty much all the time. Except when it is pitch dark... Then I crank it up! I'm still getting used to being able to type in the dark. My wife will walk by and turn off the light and then apologize because she sees me typing. I tell her not to worry... I can type anywhere now! ;)
     
  9. Rob

    Rob Toughbook Aficionado

    Reputations:
    450
    Messages:
    4,037
    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    116
    I always keep mine at full blast no madder what... I can type without looking, so typing in the dark isn't an issue (including all the characters like &*#@), the only thing I have an issue with is if i have to type with alot of :>"?}{ characters, then I look and the backlit keyboard has helped alot!
     
  10. 48user

    48user Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    well i recieved an emmissive keyboard for a cf-29 (has red f11 key) from ebay for $150+shipping. but, i need help, how do i remove the standard keyboard from the cf-30ctqazbm?
    thanks, chuck
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page