*** The Official 2019 MSI GS65 Stealth with RTX GPUs Owners and Discussions Lounge ***

Discussion in 'MSI Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by JRey, Jan 25, 2019.

  1. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    Personally I use prime95
     
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  2. maverickar15

    maverickar15 Notebook Consultant

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    So I had to relax the cache UV to -140mV (from previous -155) as it would BSOD as soon as my core UV went below -165mV.
    I think the sweet spot on the core for me is between -200mV to -220mV so far, with TDP capped at 55W. After -230mV it doesn't seem to be able to keep full turbo clocks. I'm still not using cooler boost as that use case is unrealistic for me, but the fans are maxed out (6k RPM) using silent option at high CPU temps.

    Running Cinebench R20, if I had the speedstep set to 128 (default) then it would hit 55W and throttle back to 50W, stabilizing at ~3.7 GHz and CPU max temp would be at around 89C - with this setting the score is 2900~2920.

    If I change the speedstep to 0 (max perf) then it still hits 55W but then it sits at 55W all the way through benchmark, stabilizing at ~3.8 GHz and CPU will max out at 93-94C. In this case, I get high 2980-2990s, but one time it managed to score 3003. Pretty happy with this as it was done within the boundaries of 55W TDP, which I personally think is the maximum CPU thermal capacity that this laptop chassis can dissipate w/o using cooler boost and be on the hairy edge of 95C (Both backed by our experimental data and MSI setting the default PL1 to 55W...don't think that is coincidence)

    I might lower the max TDP to 50W, just so that the CPU doesn't go above 90C in ANY case. I was burned from running Razer Blade 7700HQ hot so I'd actually prefer below 80C if possible but that means either low performance or liquid metal repaste.


    I will run Timespy again, but I think mine was around 5700 last time, which is quite a bit below yours but I'm also only running at 1590MHz GPU clock.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
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  3. unavailable

    unavailable Notebook Enthusiast

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    Seanwee, I tried the same bios CPU power limit bypass you did but only got 3190 Cinebench R20, and 7101 TIme Spy CPU, well below your 3229 and 7505 despite maintaining the maximum 4Ghz all core clock. Did you do any other major tweaks?

    I ended up undoing the change as when not using cooler boost / ramped up fans I ended up with about the same scores as without the power limit modified due to thermal limits

    Here are my final tuning results; all on the more realistic stock fan settings this time:
    Code:
    MSI GS65 Stealth-296 (I7-9750H and GTX 1660 ti) with stock fan settings
    I7-9750H undervolted -225mV Core, -150 Cache. GTX 1660 ti tuned to max of 1860MHz @ 800mV.
    
                            Stock       Tuned       Improvement
    
    Cinebench R20           2486        3000        20.7%
    Timespy CPU             5780        6611        14.3%
    
    Timespy Graphics        5625        6105         8.5%
    Heaven 4.0 Extreme      2215        2393         8.0%
    
    Refresh rate OC         144Hz       159Hz       10.4%
    
    CPU-wise am practically at both power and thermal limits. I will need to both repaste with liquid metal and do the TDP limit bypass trick in the bios to see any improvement here. Even then any improvement would be limited as I am already close to the 4.0GHz all core clock maximum on this locked processor.

    GPU-wise I'm at power limit but nowhere near thermal limits. If a way to bypass the 80W hard limit is found I should be able to significantly increase my gains here.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019
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  4. maverickar15

    maverickar15 Notebook Consultant

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    These are great results just undervolting CPU and OC'ing GPU - not bad from a laptop that is ~0.7 inch thick and 4 lb.

    MSI did a great job with cooling GPU on this laptop. I never go above 72C at max usage, and I believe you said you were at 75C but that is with hefty 270MHz+ overclock. (Actually I am quite impressed it is only 3C trade off for massive boost in GPU performance. I believe you should be close to RTX 2070 Max Q levels? Got too excited, but you are definitely over RTX 2060 performance).
    Plenty of room to push until you hit that 87C on GPU! :)

    I wish they designed the laptop with more shared heat pipes between CPU and GPU, so CPU could have benefited a bit from the extra cooling on the GPU side...
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
  5. maverickar15

    maverickar15 Notebook Consultant

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    One thing that I don't understand is how much speed shift plays into this.

    Using the same settings below
    *Core UV to -220mV
    *Cache UV to -145mV (on the hairy edge for me)
    *TDP set to 55W on both PL1/PL2

    Setting speed shift to 0 will pull all available 55W TDP, maintain 3.8GHz and net ~3000 on Cinebench R20. If It set speed shift to 96 it will slightly drop to ~2980 points. Setting it to 112 will result in ~2965, so not much lower.

    However, setting speed shift to default 128 will only pull ~32W and it will stabilize at 3.1GHz, netting ~2474 points.

    Can someone explain why there is so much difference? Why wouldn't lower speed shift setting utilize the rest of available TDP at 128?

    I've noticed something similar while playing certain FPS games - where if I set the speed shift to 128 it won't work the CPU hard enough and give m only 60~70 FPS where as only dropping it down to 112 will give me FPS boost up to 80-90 easily and it is clearly reflected here with Cinebench R20 scores. Why so much jump between 112 and 128?
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
  6. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    Well, I am using liquid metal on my gs75 so no problems with thermal throttling there. Im also running overclocked ram so that should give a small boost as well.

    I think that the current configuration is fine. The gpu should get the brunt of the cooling so that it stays at a lower temperature to get better performance (clocks increase as temps drop). As for the cpu, as long as its not thermal throttling it's fine.
     
  7. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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  8. seanwee

    seanwee Notebook Evangelist

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    I use 63 when plugged in and it gives max performance when I need it and will clock down to 800 when running light tasks. Seems like a good balance to me.
     
  9. unavailable

    unavailable Notebook Enthusiast

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    I was facing the same problem until I manually enabled speed shift in the bios. I could tell that speed shift wasn't enabled properly because the green sst logo wasn't showing up in throttlestop but it was locking my clock speed to low values like you describe. I originally thought that It was my fault as I was messing with the bios earlier and thought that I accidentally disabled it. I just checked the defaults now and the default is actually disabled. I'm not sure if this should be disabled and throttle stop is just failing to properly enable it in software or if this bios setting is just normally enabled in other bioses in general but just for whatever reason disabled in our model.

    Either way if you want to manual enable it the setting is in the hidden 'Power and Performance' bios submenu in the advanced tab. If you don't know already you can access this menu by pressing left alt + right crtl + right shift + F2 in the bios.

    I have the same setting on AC. I use 191 for my battery profile so that clocks don't jump up from idle 900Mhz to turbo or near turbo every time I do any small action like open a new tab. That being said even at 191 epp is still ramps up to full clock speed, as it should, a few seconds into a long taxing action.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
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  10. Kevin@GenTechPC

    Kevin@GenTechPC Company Representative

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    Prime95 is a great choice.
     
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