The CIA, NSA - Niantic and Pokemon Go!

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    Some people aren't comfortable with their civil liberties being slowly dismantled and personal data being infringed.
    I assume you sleep with the curtains drawn?
     
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  2. bennni

    bennni Notebook Evangelist

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    Hmm, all of those nations who are opposed to it are certainly shining beacons for civil liberties and stalwart bastions against state surveliance and control...
     
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    As they say, "it takes one to know one".

    Iran then is best positioned to blow through the BS and see things as they are without prevaricating over niceties.

    If Iran are worried about it, then you know....:D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2016
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  4. bennni

    bennni Notebook Evangelist

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    I'll concede that there's some logic to your point. On the one hand, Iran does have something of a record for demonsing everything that comes out of the US of A but on the other, its anxiety suggests that you may have a point.

    It raises the question as to who you can trust - but that road leads to tinfoil hats and nomadic, fringe existence.
     
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  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    At least you haven't given up the dream yet, fight for it brother, like you actually care about losing your privacy, instead of rolling over and taking it without a struggle. It is important.
    It's more trouble to become aware of what to do to stop it, where and when, and how to stop it.

    It's not good enough to generally know you are being screwed over, you must find out exactly how it's done, and deal with each contributing element one by one until you have re-gained understanding, fearless awareness, and eventual control.
    Saying you don't care is the lazy man's plea for leniency in his own eyes.

    You do care or you wouldn't have been so affected that you were motivated to "do something", and had to post to defend your ineptitude at managing modern life well.

    The feeling of being out of control of your privacy is an illusion, you have the ability to stop it, if you only do it. You can stop it at any point, it's up to you.

    Use that self anger positively and learn how to manage your privacy, take back your life, and make it your own again.

    It's really not that tough to figure out how to manage to stop it from happening, and still function in modern society.

    These privacy collection points are set up like honey pots, irresistible traps with an implied need to step into them unknowingly and unprepared.

    Who needs all that crap anyway?? If you can't manage it, don't do it or don't use it until you can understand it and manage it. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2016
  6. TBoneSan

    TBoneSan Laptop Fiend

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    That's a fair observation but not an argument :)
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The tin foil hat is born of the need to deal with fear(s). The tin foil may be ineffectual, but the fear and the need still exists.

    Be fearless, it leads to better awareness, and leads to better decisions.

    Don't be afraid to see what lurks in the shadows, out of easy view, that which hides in the darkness is there whether you ignore it or recognize and deal with it.

    It's an individual's journey, that follows a rather predictable path.

    Unfortunately there are those ahead of most in their journey that use their experience to take advantage of others on their journey, tripping them up and sending them in the wrong direction.

    That's how the 1/10 of 1% keep the goodies for themselves, garnering toll's, tithing, from everyone else that doesn't know better.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2016
  8. bennni

    bennni Notebook Evangelist

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    To call on people to give up their tinfoil hats is to call on them to give up a condition that requires tinfoil hats: this might be a modern-day response to Hegel's Philosophy of Right.
     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Nice convolution :)

    What I actually said, while not a "philosophy", were simple first steps toward not being a victim of the fears of the unknown.

    Drop the ineffective tin foil hats and truly understand the sources of the fears and meet them head on. Turn your tin foil hats into effective solutions to those fears that you do find to be real.

    Work on turning fear into action, not in-action.

    So in that regard, I am saying to learn to dispel the condition that leads to tin foil hats, learn to understand the unknown, turning fear into action.

    Dispel the fear through knowledge, and turn it into constructive action. A small positive action at a time.
     
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  10. Kade Storm

    Kade Storm The Devil's Advocate

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    Actually, Iran's historical credibility on this topic is a very to-the-point, if dismissive, argument. It is one of the most theocratic hellholes on the face of the planet and paranoid of its own citizens and their civil liberties. Keep in mind, one of their historical highlights remain putting out a hit on someone for writing a piece of fiction that didn't jive too well with their state dogma. A strident theocratic view that took on such bizarre paranoid dimensions that puerile films were made about portraying Salman Rushdie as some Jewish agent of Israel who had to be killed for a righteous cause.

    Let's not glorify the putrid in the process of entertaining certain fringe possibilities. Iran has its warped reasons for taking issue with Pokemon Go, and it has used similar reasons to take issue with plenty else that we don't hear about all that often, from penalising various forms of art and even potentially putting heavy metal musicians on death row for engaging in 'the devil's music' -- it's a matter of sustaining state cultural authority and strict nationalism in a bid for absolute information control.
     
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