The Biggest Notebook GPU Lie?

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by rschauby, Jan 23, 2012.

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  1. rschauby

    rschauby Superfluously Redundant

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    So, I am sure some of you may have seen the article posted on Tom's Hardware today: Radeon HD 6990M And GeForce GTX 580M: A Beautiful Lie

    For summary purposes, Thomas Soderstrom is complaining about how deceptive naming mobile GPU's the same as desktop GPU's is given the "large" performance gap. The complaint is legitimate, but I don't think very many people wander into a Best Buy and end up with a 580M notebook without knowing what to expect (if you can even find a high performance laptop in a Best Buy).

    In my view, the biggest lie the GPU/OEM manufacturers are exploiting is the VRAM buffer size. I would bet that a significant higher number of people fall victim to buying a 6250M with 3GB RAM and thinking they are in fact buying a "high end" graphics card.

    Regardless, I do wish the GPU industry would be a little more honest with how they try to market their products. Personally, I don't feel like we need regulation to protect uninformed people, but some honesty would be appreciated.
     
  2. funky monk

    funky monk Notebook Deity

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    VRAM size isn't controlled by nvidia or ATI, that's down to the manufacturer. I agree, though, that consumers should be made more aware of the tricks being pulled, especially VRAM.
     
  3. ValkerieFire

    ValkerieFire God Follower

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    This isn't a new gripe, but I completely agree it is problem.

    I wish they would just call them what their desktop version are, with a modifier on the end to denote the laptop version, which would indicate lower clocks speeds and power requirements.

    Perhaps GTX560Ti ES for the 580m. 6870L for the 6990m. Anything would be better than the current situation.

    Unfortunately though nothing will probably change.
     
  4. adantesuds

    adantesuds Newbie

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    Imformative for those who are lesser-aware of the topic.

    I agree with the naming convention, as it does make sense to me in respect that "mobile" anything are always boiled down versions, because of the natural restrictions of being smaller and more compact.

    It is a clear 2-minute way to inform those who are newer to the idea though, and I can definitely see how it could be taken misleadingly.
    But I don't think I'd want them to do it another way, as it would be perhaps harder to track the "flagship" model and it's mobile conterpart, as it would almost seem as they were less related than they might be. The case of the ATI is a little extreme, but more recent offerings are closer to what I'd expect the difference (in relation) to be.
     
  5. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I have a huge problem with there being multiple varieties of the same GPU that can vary wildly in terms of performance. This is an issue more with NVIDIA. Case and point: The GeForce GTX 560M. The same name is applied to two GPUs but one offers notably superior performance over the other.

    Who is to blame for this? NVIDIA for making multiple chips with the same name? OEMs for being less than forthcoming about what exactly is in their products? I'm genuinely curious.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    Just look at the 555m, it's all over the place too. I think they should maintain common designations between desktop and laptop also. But I think the biggest lie of them all is just rebranding the same thing over and over and over again.
     
  7. Rambisco

    Rambisco Notebook Consultant

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    Well I you have some guy buying his first gaming laptop. He sees his graphics card, maybe a 560M. So he googles "GeForce 560" and expects all sorts of performance, and then only realizes his mistake after he has bought it. There's always warranties, but not everyone gets them.

    And also, like what HT said, aren't there about 5 different 555Ms or something crazy?
     
  8. Zero989

    Zero989 Notebook Virtuoso

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    It doesn't bother me one little bit. Tom's Hardware bothers me more than nVIDIA's and AMD's naming conventions.
     
  9. 5482741

    5482741 5482741

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    I don't see an issue with naming the laptop GPU's based on their relative performance. If they performed/were exactly the same as their desktop counterparts, the "M" suffix wouldn't really be necessary.

    But I agree, the 555M is ridiculous.
     
  10. crpcookie

    crpcookie Notebook Geek

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    Most consumers who buy pre-builds don't know any better, which are whom these companies seek. If only we can buy laptop parts and assemble ourselves...
     
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