The best non-16:9 laptop?

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by EternalTireKicker, Aug 7, 2017.

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  1. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    I imagine that it would be way, way too much to hope that that panel can in fact be used with the Precision M6800...
     
  2. ygohome

    ygohome Notebook Deity

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    We have two m6500 and they are awesome except I've been using them as headless ESXi servers (lids closed) in my closet so the displays do not get used on them often. But the displays are very nice. Ours are 1920x1200. For the person considering this laptop, the M6500 offers great storage space/bays but should be aware they have SATA II controllers (not SATA III). I have these laptops hosting several VMs and they run 24x7 and one is still using the original two 2.5" 256GB SSDs that came with it from Dell in early 2010. The other I've installed some modern 2.5" 256GB SATA III SSDs (although they will only run at SATA II controller speeds). I could add a 3rd 2.5" drive if I remove the CD players. There is also an mSATA slot for an additional SSD but it is the short kind and machine is picky on mfr model SSD you chose for it. It has eSATA so we could add external storage if desired. The CPUs are great, i7-920xm is in one and I forget the CPU in the other m6500 but is an i7 too, just lesser speed. They max at 32GB via 4 DIMM slots unless you get a non quad CPU in which case you can only utilize two DIMM slots. These are perfect for hosting our VMs. But they are first gen i7 CPUs and chipset meaning the PCIe revision is basically revision 1 although Intel Ark says it is PCIe 2. It is a hybrid PCIe Rev 2 in that it has speed of PCIe rev1 but has PCIe rev2 power management benefits. One of ours is a m6500 "covet" edition that simply means Orange aluminum case and a glass covering the display. Our other M6500 is standard edition with matte display (no glass covering it) and a grey silver aluminum case. I believe the display panels are the same though other than the glass, not sure.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
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  3. slam5

    slam5 Notebook Guru

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    You are not going to get it. Any laptop with Penryn is going to have reliability problems. Even Lenovo Thinkpad of that generation is coming to EOL. You can though, get an external monitor to get the aspect ratio you want.
     
  4. OverTallman

    OverTallman Notebook Evangelist

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    One thing though, EOL =/= unreliable.

    And what you've been smoking... Penryn ThinkPads have been EOL for years already, even the support page for them were gone.
     
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  5. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Yes, neither the M6800 nor the M6500 can run that display. It requires 4-lane eDP and both Precisions use LVDS for their internal screen. Some systems feature dual connectors or different motherboard revisions, but afaik that doesn't apply here.

    Well ... one option is to use the regular, external DisplayPort connector and reroute it to the eDP panel. Cleanest is to solder the eDP cable's wires directly to the DP's solder spots on the motherboard. Resolution is not a problem, but if their DP is an early revision then a 2160p would run at 48 Hz maximum (bandwidth limitation). Fitting it needs some work; height is ok, but the 17.3" is a bit wider, of course. Perhaps the side brackets can be bent a little and, if not, cut through and fixed directly to the lid. The stub of the hinge should be structurally fixed to the lid as well then, otherwise opening and closing the lid is bound to cause cracks over time. Lastly, not all systems like it when you disconnect the internal panel, resulting in a failure to boot. Hooking up a dummy edid to the LVDS connector will bypass that.

    All-in-all ... a lot of work to get a high-gamut/high-res screen working on a fairly old system. If cost is an issue; much easier to get a decent external monitor. A used U3011 would fare nicely, I'd think.
     
  6. slam5

    slam5 Notebook Guru

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    I know exactly how reliable the c2d Thinkpad's are. The x60/61 T500/400 need maintenace. The thermal paste needs replacement. The max RAM you can having is 4gb of DDR2. Which means even running win 7 will be slow even if you have a SSD. I USED TO think 16:9 is bad coming from 4:3 (x61) or 16:10 (T61). I'm completely used to it now. Ps, i wear a high prescription glasses.
     
  7. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Unless using an external monitor is an option, the OP is going to have to compromise something in order to get everything they want on their wishlist, be it Windows 7 compatibility, non 16:9 aspect ratio screen, or using reasonably modern hardware.

    As a side note, using Windows on a Mac is not really a viable everyday solution. Battery life is worse, the trackpad stinks, scaling is terrible on a Retina display (especially on Windows 7), and the built-in keyboard's layout is not optimal for a Windows environment.
     
  8. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    I can get an external monitor easily enough; the problem is that that is not mobile. I currently use a 6x10 (pixel) font which is physically 6 points on my 1920x1200 screen; I could quite comfortably go smaller except that the character cell is too small and the forms are therefore distorted. I would expect to use a 9x15 font on a 4K screen (roughly 4.5 points).

    I'm really, really annoyed at how Dell butchered the 7710 (presumably to make it thinner and lighter).

    I do keep a watch on 4K 24" monitors. 4K (much less 2560x1600) would be too coarse on a 30" monitor.
     
  9. OverTallman

    OverTallman Notebook Evangelist

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    And more mistakes from you:
    1. Every computer needs maintenance, doesn't matter if it's old or not. Not doing proper maintenance routinely and you're gonna shave some life off from it.

    2. Thermal paste is a consumable which has to be regularly replaced, preferably once every 1-2 years, more if the computer is frequently used. It's the same as motor oil in an engine: You think an engine's gonna last if you never change the oil? :rolleyes:

    3. It's been confirmed by many that most (if not all) laptops with the real GM965 or PM965 chipset can take 4GB DDR2 modules, therefore those with 2 slots (such as T61, R61, X61, X300) can have 8GB RAM at max. Of course whether it's worth the expense is another question.

    4. The mainstream x00-series ThinkPads (except SL300, SL400, SL500, X100e and X300) uses DDR3 RAM. X200, T400, T500, R400, R500, W500, W700, all of them use DDR3.

    5. 4GB RAM is absolutely fine for Windows 7/8/10 as long as you're not doing big stuff. For casual document work, web browsing and video playback, 4GB is plenty.
    While I won't doubt T61 and R61 with Nvidia graphics are rather unreliable, they'll still last long if you baby it. Mind you I do have a T61 with Nvidia graphics, an R61 with Intel graphics and an X61 with T7300, and I still own them as of now.

    My E5510 is my daily driver now, with a 15.6" 1600x900 (16:9) screen. I'm quite happy with the screen considering I'm moderately short-sighted (so high prescription glasses too) and I hate dealing with Windows DPI settings. All is good except when I'm dealing with documents and websites, it simply doesn't give enough vertical space for me. Thankfully my 2740p has a 16:10 screen (16:9 screen on a pen tablet is a nightmare) and I have a fairly nice HP ZR24w (with a 1920x1200 IPS screen) for my desktop.
     
  10. ygohome

    ygohome Notebook Deity

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    I missed what was butchered in the Dell 7710. I'm not offended (we have two of them), just don't understand what you mean.
     
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