Taming the Beast: 4930mx

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by TheReciever, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    This will mark my adventures with taming the 4930mx, a notoriously hot chip of its era, and the last rPGA CPU available to us.

    For my particular platform, the methods available seem to be able to push the chip to 4.3Ghz. This is usually done with a 10.4-55cfm fan, the aftermarket 4 pipe copper heatsink and liquid metal.

    I aim for 4.5Ghz

    Yes, this will be a frankentop, no it will not be mobile, and yes its a DTR. No, I do not want a Desktop, and I have reasons for that. With that out of the way, I will share the ideas I have come up with for cooling the CPU.

    Pictures to follow.
     
  2. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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  3. Chastity

    Chastity Company Representative

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  4. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    No luck with getting the 4980HQ or some similar Crystal Well CPU working on your laptop?
    Given that it seems to only need the micro-code to be present, it should give you better clocks, and better perf due to the extra L4 cache.

    Also, is your motherboard VRM's up to the task?
     
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  5. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    No, crystal well never worked. We have injected crystal well microcode as well and still no post. I'm not a bios modder just a humble hobbyist sadly but if anyone wants to try their hand I can be a Guinea pig no problem lol.

    I believe it's likely due to the lack of digital output but I can't be sure, as the repackaged 4980hq doesn't output digital signals. That alone shouldn't be an issue but perhaps there are other aspects of the cpu that aren't functional that are preventing it from posting. I'm happy with where it's at though, the iris pro helps out the t440p quite nicely.

    I'm hoping if the cpu is cooler then the vrms should be OK as well, time will tell though
     
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  6. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    The t440p seems to have the QM87 chipset, while the AW has the HM87 chipset, but there isn't any massive difference and both should support the same CPU's..

    What is the intel ME firmware version running on the t440p and what version are you running on the AW? Maybe its linked to either ME version, or ME firmware need a nudge using FITC(or maybe going nuclear and disable_me).

    Also, nice work on the heatsink, if the VRM's are near, maybe solder a piece of cooper plate to provide extra cooling to the VRM inductors/MOSFETs.
     
  7. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    Im not sure, I can check that when I get home tonight.

    The problem here is I still need to make more adjustments, I want 4 heatpipes in a single row.

    The bigger problem is that I have never soldered anything in my life lol and dont know anyone willing to take the task even if compensated. So either figure it out with caution (heat pipe is essentially a pipe bomb) or contact someone that is willing to take on the task.

    Everything else I can prep myself. I guess I can ask my brother in law if he has used 63/37 solder paste before and how to work with it.
     
  8. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    DONT use regular solder!!!

    You need low temperature solder with a high bismuth content, something like chipquik that melts at 138°C, regular solder that melts at or over 220°C will result in broken/exploded heatpipes.

    If the heatpipes are already covering the lenght of the die, unless you have a thick cooper "heatspreader" more heatpipes side by side wont help much.
     
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  9. TheReciever

    TheReciever D! For Dragon!

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    @Khenglish had used that paste with his 1080 heatsink unless I read it incorrectly?

    There is some of the heat spreader that doesn't have heatpipe contact, I can't really stack as that will also increase the height and becomes larger than the fan I plan to use. The idea is to mitigate burst power fluctuation.

    I'll look into that paste you mention, does it have the same thermal conductivity as 63/37?
     
  10. senso

    senso Notebook Deity

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    Its more or less the same paste used by the heatsink oems, they all use solder with high bismuth content, or they would burst the heatpipes.

    If you want burst handling you need a thick cooper heatspreader to act as a thermal damper.

    If it wasnt chipquik it was something similar and I have also used it with good results.

    Lots of flux on all parts, plenty of solder paste, arrange everything and lock all in place with a jig, toss in an oven, heatsoak for a couple minutes ate 80°C, raise to 140°C, watch till solder melts, give it 10 seconds to flow/wet well, turn off heating and open the oven. Its easy, but try with a couple pieces of scrap to learn, and then off you go, Just make sure you dont use regular solder.
     
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