Take a look at this article!

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by Xirurg, Aug 4, 2009.

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  1. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    I think that's what they did. :twitchy:

    I like the KERS technology more.

    About ESC, personally I prefer driving without it. :D
     
  2. crash

    crash NBR Assassin

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    As a mechanical engineer, I too think that regenerative braking is really cool. :)

    I think ESC is super important not because it increase driving control (in fact it makes it difficult to do certain maneuvers), but because for the average person it can help save many lives.
     
  3. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    Regenerative braking is actually a pretty old concept/technology, I'm glad to see that they're putting effort to develop it again. However, I think it will take another few years before we will see it on common consumer vehicles.

    You're right though, ESC does save lives.
     
  4. Gregory

    Gregory disassemble?

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    After reading that I have an overwhelming desire to save for a Mercedes. By the time I can afford it they will probably fly and have warp drive.
     
  5. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

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    You really do not know what you are talking about.
    If you have an I6, you have a single exhaust manifold. So one turbo max.

    If you have a V6, you have two manifolds, so you can have twin turbo's, or a single large one fed by both manifolds

    K-TRON
     
  6. Charles P. Jefferies

    Charles P. Jefferies Lead Moderator Super Moderator

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    BMW uses two small turbochargers in their 3.0L I6 engines: BMW 335i.
    I am not sure how they are arranged though.
     
  7. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    Both parallel and sequential methods can be done on an inline engine.

    Nissan's famous RB26DETT is an I6 that uses the parallel twin-turbo configuration.

    [​IMG]

    BMW's N54 engine in the 335i uses the parallel method as well, but their 2.0l I4 engine in the 320D uses the sequential twin-turbo configuration instead. So you can see, either way is possible.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

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    thanks Stewie and Chaz, I didnt think their were twin turbo I6's

    In the industrial diesel engine world I live in, there are not. Just a single large one.

    K-TRON
     
  9. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    No problem at all K-TRON, look at that RB26DETT, what a piece of jewel, I almost wet myself just by looking at it. :D

    As for the industrial diesel engines, the main reason why many road car configurations chose two smaller turbos vs. a single large one is to eliminate some turbo lag. I guess in the industrial world, turbo lag isn't a very big issue.
     
  10. aan310

    aan310 Notebook Virtuoso

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    lol you should know i don't have the slightest clue what i am talking about by now :D

    But none the less, i guess my random comment was actually correct :)
    Ignorance IS bliss :p
     
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