Tablets are 32 bit or 64 bit?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by aigle, Sep 1, 2011.

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  1. DEagleson

    DEagleson Gamer extraordinaire

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    ARM tablets are just bigger editions of their companys phones, just without the actual phone capabilitied.
    My Galaxy S 2 has 1gb of system memory so i doubt im running 64 bit Android.

    Windows 8 can also be used on Intel / AMD tablets and probably will be 64 bit.
    The ARM version of Windows 8?
    Dont think so.
     
  2. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    You know, despite having, in their history, 512bit memory bus (keep this distinction in mind), 16+16+16+16+32bit ALU clusters, internal two way 512bit rin buses, AMD GPU only needs a 16bit memory register space (well, call it addressing space, too) ;)

    Intel and AMD CPUs are not running a 64bit memory address space. 36-48bit, yes. 64bit? No. Intel and AMD CPUs are not really 64bit, their instruction sets may be, but certain extsions bring that to 128bit, and 256bit wide execution units... (more specifically, the FPU).

    However, as an overall setup, I guess we can refer to the base instruction set, AMD64/x86_64 as defining the "64bit" system. :p
     
  3. Abidderman

    Abidderman Notebook Deity

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    If by tablet you are excluding slates, then I don't know. But if your talking slates also, then there are several that run win7, which means they also can run 64. My ep121 is running win7 64, and there are others that can do so also. Or did I just misunderstand the question?
     
  4. Abidderman

    Abidderman Notebook Deity

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    Jeremy. it is too late, and I have had a few too many drinks celebrating the Badgers win tonight to be able to comprehend what you said. It looks right, but I am not right. Thanks though.
     
  5. aigle

    aigle Notebook Consultant

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    Hi, thanks a lot for the reply. It makes sense now. :)
     
  6. newsposter

    newsposter Notebook Virtuoso

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    The most common ARM core design in use in tablets and phones has 2x 32 bit cpus with a nominal clock speed of 1 Gz. A lot of licensees take this core, wrap a load of extra stuff around it, and overclock it as high as 1.5 Gz (Archos). Common overclocking is at around 1.2 Gz.

    Apple licensed this basic design and reworked it into their own A4/A5 line for iOS as found in the iPhone/iPod and iPad.

    ARM has published reference designs for 64 bit chips with 4 cores that are intended to run at 1.5Gz nominal with overclocking possible depending on the specific hardware implementation. I don't think that anyone has taken that design to silicon outside of pre-production samples. People are kind of hung up on what Intel, AMD, and Nvidia are going to do with their next gen micro/mobile cpus. Some of that will depend on what Microsoft does with Windows 8.

    ARM still makes a shedload of money licensing their 16 bit core designs though. Not everyone who needs an established ARM cpu needs the graphics and comms capabilities that phones and tablets do.
     
  7. chimpanzee

    chimpanzee Notebook Virtuoso

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  8. newsposter

    newsposter Notebook Virtuoso

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    ARM as a cpu architecture is all over. ARM designs are probably the most common industrial controller in production right now. Besides the devices we've talked about here, you're going to find ARM-derived cpus in everything from kids toys to washing machines and automotive & aviation engine controllers. Honeywell uses ARM cpus in digital flight deck systems used by Airbus and Boeing. Garmin uses ARM in their general aviation glass cockpit systems too. Honeywell, GE, and Williams use ARM in their FADEC turbine engine controllers.

    MIPS is another one. Cisco uses a heavily customized MIPS design as the standard cpu in their commercial product lines. You'll find a lot of MIPS-derived cpus in cable tv set-top boxes (running QNX or some Linux distro). The Chinese are really, really enamored with the MIPS baseline architecture and have pushed the envelope with new designs and implementations.
     
  9. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Mostly Harmless...

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    Now you're using math and real sense. What's wrong with you? :p

    2^16
     
  10. niffcreature

    niffcreature Notebook Prophet

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    This is really quite interesting. +rep. I don't think a lot of people know these kinds of things about embedded systems and the industry. Its a good indication of how wrong the logic is that ARM cpus are just sequentially a bar lower than say atom, and that even if they were all 32 & 64 bit it wouldn't matter because they are still a different instruction set and part of an entirely different industry.
     
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