T440p Owner's Thread

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by blackspawn, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. dimos

    dimos Notebook Enthusiast

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    @spivoler @AnakiMana
    I also have similar heat issue: the left palm rest gets considerably warm, even if CPU utilization is low.
    In general when CPU temp stays for long time > 50-54°C then the palm rest gets too too hot for my taste (I'm an ex owner of T520, T430, XPS 15, Vaio Z2).

    I have been experimenting around with the followings (I use Linux):
    a) manual CPU throttling (script which disables turbo, and caps max frequency)
    b) custom fan-control daemon
    c) manual HDD suspend (located right under the left palmrest)
    d) disable the discrete GPU (recent kernel + bbswitch, or, via acpi_call)
    e) PowerTop tunables
    f) BIOS performance / thermal settings

    What I've found to be really helpful so far are:
    - keep the fan always on (Level-1 is 3070rpm, Level-2 is 3440rpm, I use L2 as minimum)
    - run a very lightweight desktop/windows manager (i3 wm)
    - disable the Nvidia GPU
    - enable SATA link + DRAM controller power saving features in powerTop
    - put all BIOS settings to Battery optimized + balanced (no effect on performance / turboboost so far)
    - spin-down/suspend the HDD (used only for storage) + put the OS SSD in Caddy
    - the computer runs considerably cooler when on Battery (this is expected)

    FYI my configuration is:
    T440p, 4-core i7 4810mq, 16GB ram @1600MHz, FHD AUO, SSD(caddy)+HDD, modded T450s touchpad with physical buttons)
    OS is Ubuntu 14.04 64bit [3.19 kern.] + i3 WM
     
  2. cavoknosig

    cavoknosig Newbie

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    hi fellow t440p'ers ;-)

    got this machine as my replacement for the trusty dell latitude e6400 which served me very well for years :)

    overall, i'm pretty happy with the choice. size/form factor and performance are perfect for my use.... (everything from office to programming to gaming)

    few observations:
    - decided to upgrade to win10 pro right away in order not having to do it later / being able to do a clean install if necessary (product key issue, having to go through the upgrade at least once). this worked basically ok, except for the lenovo power manager software which kept crashing thereafter (deinstalled). for the remaining drivers / software it makes sense to get the latest from support.lenovo.com. the preinstalled lenovo "update" utility is not worth it / doesn't seem to get that the pc is now on windows 10.
    - as it is win10 pro (based on the win7 pro that came preinstalled), was able to do everything with local accounts and go for maximum privacy thereafter / group policy editor to disable fully automatic updates. be careful already during the upgrade to customize the install so nothing gets "syncd" with MS$ unwanted.
    - installed classic shell shortly after testing the win10 start menu (start menu options only). don't really get how 10 is hailed to be much better over win8... in any case, win7 still just works way better for me . the explorer itself is very nice and an upgrade over windows 7.

    - keyboard needs a warranty replacement (quality control?), one key does not have the "click" at all and feels mushy.
    warranty service by telephone (switzerland) was very good though and offered to either send a technician or let me do the replacement myself. hoping now that the new keyboard will be consistent...
    the keyboard itself feels quite good and deserves praise.
    downside is the weird control/FN key placement. there is a bios option to reverse their functions, but the physical named keys, and the led on the FN key are all wrong then. anyone have a source to order new keys with the reverse naming but correct form factor?

    - had to read a bit through the manuals to learn that FN-ESC (once) sets the default behaviour for function keys, which is really how it should be from the start.

    - no ambient light sensor unfortunately. find myself having to click FN-space for the backlight all the time... something that i will probably automate. just stupid the way it is like that.

    - the default touchpad is ok and definitely not worse than the (poor/small) alps touchpad on the dell (got used to it very quickly, basically not missing the physical buttons the dell had). only complaint is the long throw and cheapish and loud rattle/click sound everytime it is pressed. already have the T450s touchpad and will definitely do the "frankenpad" replacement. don't get why they don't upgrade new-builds with the better touchpad?!?

    - further mods are going to be a HD haddy instead of the optical drive and 8gb additional RAM. will try to get intel rapid start working again with modified partitions (breaks when more ram is added due to the "small" hybernation partition.

    - when using the pc only to surf the web at night, the fan tends to "pump" annyoingly... anyone have experience how to tune the system in these cases to run at low steady fan speeds / maybe intentionally "throttle" so that the wife can sleep and doesn't complain ;-) @Lenovo: the wife acceptance factor is very important ;-) (besides the loud touchpad click)

    thanks for the info in the thread!
    regards,
    cavok
     
  3. Chemengineer15

    Chemengineer15 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Congrats on the purchase!

    The fan issue is very common and it does pump up when you are using chrome or IE. Try switching to Mozilla.

    How is the touch pad on yours. Mine had eraser filling type stuff coming of in initial days of use and now have a shiny orb / weathered spot in the middle., seen from an angle.
     
  4. cavoknosig

    cavoknosig Newbie

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    touch pad itself is ok so far, after a few days still looks like new.
    but as mentioned, will replace it with the t450s for shorter throw, less noise and hardware buttons anyway.
    do you use hand cream or anything like that, which might cause a chemical interaction?
     
  5. Chemengineer15

    Chemengineer15 Notebook Enthusiast

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    No i dont think its a reaction, Here are a few pics of mine and another person experiencing it on x1 carbon:

    http://imgur.com/ND6gKFC,d08HMuQ,E8Hd3RQ#0

    http://imgur.com/u06Dt47,bZa7Qm4,rnfxZBg,tEfsNmR

    Maybe its normal? What do you say.
     
  6. cavoknosig

    cavoknosig Newbie

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    progress report:

    keyboard:
    - replacing / removing and reinstalling the keyboard is a piece of cake

    2nd HDD caddy:
    - the ultrabay HDD caddy off ebay came with a generic faceplate (knew that) which did not fit the t400p at all (major difference). had to remove the faceplate off the optical drive, which was somewhat tricky without damaging anything. but in the end, the move was successful.

    RAM upgrade from 8GB to 16GB:
    - installing the extra module in the empty slot, well, that's even more piece of cakeish than the keyboard ;-)
    - for the rearrangement / to have intel rapid start still working with the extra RAM, i proceeded roughly according to a guide found on dell ;-) http://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/19/SLN115170/DE
    - before the upgrade, i had already rearranged some of the partitions on the ssd (shrunk main volume, deleted old lenovo recovery partition, deleted original hibernation partition.
    then created a new D:\ partition minus the space for a new hibernation partition of 16GB. (8192MB [value recommended by dell/intel for 8GB] times 2 to be precise)
    this remaining partition then received the custom id=84 as per the dell guidance.
    - instead of the lenovo power manager software (which always crashed on win 10), installed the intel RST driver directly and was able to turn it on (with 1h standby).
    - by all indications, it seems to work perfectly after the upgrade.

    t450s touchpad mod:
    - removing the keyboard bezel (for the touchpad substitution) was quite tricky, to be honest. definitely not something for the faint-hearted.
    - there are different guides, that basically have you take the whole laptop apart, which is not necessary. on the other hand, it's not easy, and sometimes, even after instructional videos not clear when some wiggling/prying is allowed and when not. so broke a little retainer clip off the keyboard bezel in the process (the centermost at the front of the touchpad) but it has no feelable or visible impact. so, the replacement didn't go without marks, which had been the intention ;-)
    - the connectors for the various flat cables are surprisingly "finger" friendly, simple fingernail "actuation" worked better than using tools. (spreading the force better, no single load points, no scratches). the tricky part is that there are multiple types of connectors, which all have some kind of bar to be moved, but not all in the same direction/side of the connector. especially, the one at the touchpad itself was kind of tricky. (move from opposite to the cable flat to center up). using the same technique as with all other connectors, i slightly damaged the connector of the original touchpad when taking it out (more cosmetic than anything else). but again, left some scratchmarks :-(

    t450s touchpad itself:
    i hate to say it, but also this "solution" is not perfect :-( don't know why they can't get it just right?!?....
    for starters, i always disable tap-to-click, as to me, the risk of accidental activation of something is just way too big. this seems to become somewhat of an issue now with drag and drop.
    i really got used to the click-everyhwere type input of the original t440p touchpad very quickly and partly miss that part of the feature now.

    pros of the new style touchpad:
    - nice touch
    - smooth, mellow clicking sound
    - hardware buttons for trackpoint
    - shorter throw (at the bottom/front) than the original keypad
    - solid feel, no play when moving finger over it.

    downsides:
    - physical click-everywhere does not work. only clicking at the very bottom is possible, the force required gradually increases when moving upwards as the click is a top hinge design. the flat area below the physical buttons should really have been the same style as with the original touchpad, but with the characteristics of the new touchpad! maybe that is impossible?
    - drag and drop (with tap-to-click disabled) does not (yet?) work comfortably, needs some more testing and tweaking (test with gestures disabled possibly?)
    - driver needs some tweaking regarding pointer speeds etc... the original one worked well out of the box and seemed very well optimized for the original touchpad.
    - no more nfc reader, had to remove it with the old touchpad as it is directly connected/combined.

    the jury is still out, can't exclude the option of going back to the original touchpad, need to experience and optimize the new one for a bit longer. but the new one is not a 100% clear win over the old one so far unfortunately :-(

    just my 50cts,

    kind regards
    cavok
     
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  7. hayova

    hayova Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi2all!

    Can some one who just bought t440p tell me, does model still has coil whine (i mean lately producted revisions)?

    TIA
     
  8. ThinkPad 87

    ThinkPad 87 Newbie

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    Greeting hayova,

    I just got my T440p delivered a few days ago. For me it is dead silent. I have a T510 that has slight coil whine (not as bad as many others had it), so it was not loud enough to drive me crazy, and I could easily lived with it. So far this machine is very very quiet.
     
  9. buckling spring

    buckling spring Notebook Enthusiast

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    I will add my impressions to this long and informative thread. I’ve had my T440p for a month now. Much of what I am sharing has already been pointed out, but if anyone is considering getting this model before it’s replaced (T460p?), I hope they find this helpful, if a bit redundant with previous reviews.

    Some specs:
    i7-4810MQ
    Win10 Pro
    NVIDIA Discrete GPU
    8 GB RAM (4+4)
    256GB SSD
    6 cell battery

    Firstly, I will just add that I chose this model over the newer, sleeker ThinkPads because I was looking for a 14” or 15” quad-core ThinkPad, and the only choices I saw were the T440p, T540p, or W541. Other brands I considered were Dell and HP, but I wasn’t too impressed with those offerings. I knew that sometime later this year or early next year the P50 and P70 laptops were going to be available, but I didn’t want to wait for a product that could arrive late while also having some growing pains out of the gate, and honestly, a quad-core Haswell doesn’t really give up all that much in performance to most newer Broadwell or Skylake CPUs from what I read. Performance and keyboard quality were my priorities, battery life and chassis thinness were not so important.

    Some thoughts on my T440p:

    Performance
    As expected, a very fast machine that should stay fast for several years. A fast CPU paired with an SSD is the simple formula for a pleasant computing experience. The fan seems to come on at appropriate times, no issues there. Other than the occasional fan noise, this machine is dead quiet.

    Build quality/Design
    Disappointed. The lower chassis material is rock solid, however the top (keyboard side) features a glued-on piece of plastic that 1) flexes, and 2) creates a seam on the sides that makes the whole laptop feel cheap and vulnerable. How was this seam deemed acceptable from a design/user experience point of view? Additionally, as stated many times in other folks’ reviews, the screen is scary in how little protection it provides and how wobbly it is. Also the screen is awkward, even difficult, to open. With no securing latch, just magnets to hold it shut, and hinges that are overly tight, it is an unpleasant experience every time I open it up. Over a month of use has not loosened it up any. This aspect of the user experience is puzzling – how can this design aspect have been deemed up to the ThinkPad standard? I guess the answer is that today’s standards are just that much lower than the standards of even just five years ago.

    Screen
    I received the LG IPS screen (1080p), and am happy with its performance. It’s bright and provides decent viewing angles. Scaling is an issue however, and I feel I’ve learned an important lesson – in the future I’ll buy the screen that has the native resolution that corresponds best to 100% scaling in the programs I use the most. Unlike on the Mac, Windows laptop scaling provides an extremely sub-optimal viewing experience (e.g., blurry text), and definitely one of the weak points of Windows laptops.


    Keyboard
    The best laptop keyboard I’ve ever used. The keys' springy tactile feedback enables me to type quickly, accurately, and pleasantly. However, the layout is inferior to the previous generation (which I have on my T510). Please bring back a dedicated row of function keys (i.e., F1, F2, F3,…)! My idea of the ultimate keyboard is the IBM Model M keyboard, so that is where my preferences lie. If they could graft a Model M onto a 15” laptop with some additional laptop specific keys (like they sort of tried to do in the early days), that would be cool!


    Trackpad
    From the heavenly feel of the keyboard to the hell of the trackpad: the trackpad used on the T440p is pretty crappy. I’m not sure how it made the cut for a professional machine like the T440p. I’d expect something like this on the cheapest model line perhaps. Its only saving grace is that it provides smooth two-finger scrolling, and I do a lot of that. It feels super cheap and if you want to click it by pushing downward, the necessary travel is way too great. Fortunately, I’m a tap-to-click guy, and not a clicker, otherwise I would have returned this laptop within the first week.

    Conclusion
    Overall I feel this laptop is a keeper as the positives slightly outweigh the negatives. I realize this is a rather tepid endorsement. But for me, the screen was good enough, the keyboard is great, and the performance is very snappy.
     
  10. Kirbot

    Kirbot Newbie

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    I'm late to the party, but I finally decided to retire my T500, and picked up one of these. Should be arriving on monday.

    i5-4300U, 8gb ram, Nvidia graphics, 1600x900 TN display, 500gb hdd, extended battery, win 10
    I have a 180gb intel ssd I'll be adding, and sticking the 500gb in an ultrabay caddy.

    Eventually I'll probably do the t450 touchpad swap, and add an IPS display.

    $360 later I feel like I got a pretty good deal.
     
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