Stereo Mix replacement in recording device settings needed

Discussion in 'Microsoft Windows XP and Vista' started by Mooncatt, Mar 31, 2014.

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  1. Mooncatt

    Mooncatt Notebook Guru

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    I've got a laptop running Vista and started beta testing a new visualization software package. The main program doesn't need a sound input to run, but it has a side feature that's a game that requires beat detection from an audio source (be it a music player, online radio, and especially via a line input). Normally I'd use the stereo mix option in the recording devices section of the sound properties, but this laptop (a Gatway brand with Conexant audio drivers, not the one in my sig) doesn't have the option. Only the microphone. I've already tried turning on the display disabled devices option and updating the driver (there isn't one available), but the stereo mix option just isn't available. What I've found so far is that Windows has that ability removed in some computers all together and this seems to be one of them.

    I'm thinking my only solution would be something like a virtual sound card. I know they exist, but mostly aimed at doing audio recording and not sure if it would help me. What I'm looking for is something that would let the program listen in to what would normally be the stereo mix with the actual source being sound from the laptop and/or a line input from another source like a DJ mixer. For testing purposes, I'd like to be able to play something locally like an mp3 or from Pandora that the progam can "listen" to while also playing through the speakers or through my TV when the HDMI is hooked up.

    So far, all the virtual sound cards I've found are pay to use. SInce I'm not sure if it would work or if there's a better method, I don't really want to spend that kind of money. Are there any free version programs out there that may fit my needs? I've also considered jumping the headphone out to Mic input jacks, but that would be more cumbersome and cluttered for doing an event and the mic input would only pick up one channel.
     
  2. Apollo13

    Apollo13 100% 16:10 Screens

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    The last sentence of your post was what I was going to suggest - the analog hole as it's called. Back when I had Vista, I did that occasionally to record sounds. It is true that many laptops with Vista did not support stereo mix, from what I heard due to pressure from the RIAA. When I was more familiar with this around 2008 I understood it as all computers with Vista had it disabled, as in Vista simply did not support it. I've heard from friends with Windows 8 that it's back there, but that may still depend on the model in question. Still, upgrading to Windows 8 may solve the issue.

    Alternately, the machine in your sig appears to have XP, and Stereo Mix is supported in XP. So you could use it for this task instead of the Vista laptop.

    Finally, this SuperUser question's answer lists several pieces of software that can supposedly record a stereo mix even when it isn't enableable on 7. I can't vouch for the accuracy of the answer myself, but there's enough options that it wouldn't be surprising if at least one of them works for a low cost or free.
     
  3. Mooncatt

    Mooncatt Notebook Guru

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    Thanks, and I also mentioned this issue to the developer. He ended up incorporating something into the software that let the program pick up the audio like the stereo mix would to bypass the problem after I created this thread. The machine in my sig is actually down for the count due to a defective graphics card, but you're right and I had used it in my setup for beat reactive programs before.
     
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