Step by Step: 980m Install in Alienware 18

Discussion in 'Alienware 18 and M18x' started by 1Schumsta1, Jan 8, 2015.

  1. 1Schumsta1

    1Schumsta1 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hey Guys.

    So many people are asking how to upgrade AW18 to 980ms and i decided to make a tutorial how to do it (or i have done it.. :) ) I made an upgrade from 880m SLI so i have 100W Heatsinks. It does not work with 70W Heatsinks (Thx to Shekelstein)

    Heatsink Partnumbers for AW18 980m cards:
    Heat sink - 980M - part number 43K2P (right)
    Heat sink - 980M - part number 54TRV (left)
    1. Buy 980m or 980m SLI
      Vendors: Eurocom, CEG, RJTech, HIDevolution
      All of them are working i think, cause there is no special difference between each other.
      I bought it from CEG, 8GB vram.
      !Dont forget that you need: 4 screws + X-bracket!

    2. sBIOS A10 or A12?
      If you have BIOS Version A12 continue with Step 5, because there is no need for an UEFI Partition

    3. Create bootable UEFI windows 8.1 installation USB flash drive with Rufus
      Rufus is freeware and a small utility that creates bootable USB flash drive for Windows 7 or 8. Just select Windows 8.1 ISO Image and then !GPT partition scheme for UEFI computer!

    4. Prepare BIOS for Upgrade to pure UEFI
      Before install 980m in AW18 you need to modify Bios settings: Under Boot Section: Secure Boot: Disabled, Load Legacy Option Rom: Disabled, Boot List Option: UEFI

    5. Adjust Heatsinks
      I just used a Hand milling machine. It is very easy, if you havent 2 left feet. :D

      toadjust.JPG adjustment.jpg
      Left Picture: Area with Red Border need to be modified, Right Picture: Modified Heatsinks​

    6. Put 980ms into AW18
      I used Gelid GC-Extreme (Idle ~44°C, Full Load ~71°C)


      installed.jpg
      Both cards are recognized in BIOS​

    7. Update vBIOS
      Update vBios from Both Cards with Prema Mod v1.1.1
      AW18_8GB_GTX980M_OC_PM_v1.1.1 --> LINK

      If you want to use latest Nvidia Drivers use Prema Mod v2
      GTX980M_8GB_MXM_OC_PM_v2 --> LINK

    8. Install Drivers
      I installed drivers vom Mr. Fox 344.75 Mod and i havent any problems till yet. If installer shows an error, try to Disable Driver Enforcement Signature Verification. --> Disable DESV

      344.75 Driver Mod from Mr. Fox --> LINK
      or newer ones from J95 (ONLY with PremaMod v2) --> LINK

    9. Adjust Fans (SLI) with Hwinfo64
      If you installed 980m SLI, and second Fan is not working, you need to use hwinfo to activate and control the fan of second 980m.
      I just followed this tutorial from Mr.Fox. --> LINK

    10. IMPORTANT THINGS
      - BIOS A10 -> Don't switch to Legacy Mode afterwards! -> 8 Beeps = Reinstall old cards :/
      - The recent Versions of EVGA Precision X (through Nvidia Driver) are bricking the LCD Screens EDID!

    BRICKED LCD-Display?

    For all people, who bricked their LCD-Display, follow this Instructions: (BIG THX @t456)
    1. Download this Linux Image: LINK
    2. Write to a USB Stick with rufus or USB Image Tool
    3. Follow this Instructions
      start

      01 check 'pnp id -panel nrs.txt' for the correct bin

      02 copy it to the 'write-edid' folder

      03 open terminal (ctr+alt+T)

      04 sudo bash

      05 sudo sensors-detect

      Hit 'n' for all 'YES/no' questions, EXCEPT I2C/SMBus, hit 'y' for that.

      There'll be something like 'Using driver 'i2c-XYZ' <- mine was i2c-i801 (Lynx Point),
      hit 'n' for the remaining questions.

      06 sudo modprobe i2c-XYZ (i2c-i801 for me)
      07 sudo modprobe i2c-dev
      08 sudo i2cdetect -l

      result:
      ######################################
      root@it:~# sudo i2cdetect -l
      i2c-0 i2c i915 gmbus ssc I2C adapter
      i2c-1 i2c i915 gmbus vga I2C adapter
      i2c-2 i2c i915 gmbus panel I2C adapter
      i2c-3 i2c i915 gmbus dpc I2C adapter
      i2c-4 i2c i915 gmbus dpb I2C adapter
      i2c-5 i2c i915 gmbus dpd I2C adapter
      i2c-6 i2c DPDDC-A I2C adapter
      i2c-7 i2c DPDDC-C I2C adapter
      i2c-8 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-0 I2C adapter
      i2c-9 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-1 I2C adapter
      i2c-10 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-2 I2C adapter
      i2c-11 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-5 I2C adapter
      i2c-12 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-6 I2C adapter
      i2c-13 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-7 I2C adapter
      i2c-14 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-8 I2C adapter
      i2c-15 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-9 I2C adapter
      i2c-16 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-26 I2C adapter
      i2c-17 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-27 I2C adapter
      i2c-18 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-28 I2C adapter
      i2c-19 i2c nouveau-0000:01:00.0-29 I2C adapter
      root@it:~#
      ######################################

      If, for whatever reason, you have restarted/rebooted AFTER running 'i2cdetect -l';
      ALWAYS RE-RUN THAT COMMAND before asssuming the edid will be on the same bus. The bus
      enumeration is usually fixed, but not always so; make CERTAIN you have the right bus.

      Those 0-19 are the list of buses, now we need to find out which bus the panel is on.
      It could be 'panel' (bus 2), but one the 'DPDDC's is also possible.
      Let's try bus 2 first. we read (-r) the bytes 0 to 127, so 128 bytes in total, and
      we check this bus 2 at address 50 <- this SHOULD contain the edid, BUT-T-T-T ...
      that is not guaranteed -> IF it is on a different address then either the read part
      or, especially, the writing part can change things that are hard to fix.

      We're not interested in the difference between 128 byte or 256 byte edids yet,
      so extracting the first 128 bytes will do for now.

      09 sudo i2cdump -r 0-127 2 0x50

      result:
      ######################################
      root@it:~# sudo i2cdump -r 0-127 2 0x50
      No size specified (using byte-data access)
      WARNING! This program can confuse your I2C bus, cause data loss and worse!
      I will probe file /dev/i2c-2, address 0x50, mode byte
      Probe range limited to 0x00-0x7f.
      Continue? [Y/n] y
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f 0123456789abcdef
      00: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      10: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      20: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      30: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      40: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      50: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      60: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      70: XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
      root@it:~#
      ######################################

      So the edid is not here. If it was the edid then you'll see the
      '00 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00' start header, even if a little corrupted.
      If you find that then you know the bus AND the address.
      Anyway, let's try bus 6 next (DPDDC-A).

      09 sudo i2cdump -r 0-127 6 0x50

      result:
      ######################################
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f 0123456789abcdef
      00: 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 4d 10 ff 13 00 00 00 00 ........M?.?....
      10: 00 17 01 04 a5 1d 11 78 06 de 50 a3 54 4c 99 26 .??????x??P?TL?&
      20: 0f 50 54 00 00 00 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 ?PT...??????????
      30: 01 01 01 01 01 01 56 5e 00 a0 a0 a0 29 50 30 20 ??????V^.???)P0
      40: 35 00 26 a5 10 00 00 18 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 5.&??..?...?....
      50: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00 00 .............?..
      60: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 fc ...............?
      70: 00 4c 51 31 33 33 54 31 4a 57 30 32 0a 20 00 b0 .LQ133T1JW02? .?
      ######################################

      Good, bus 6 it is. Now pay attention to byte 7e. Read address
      like it was excel: ROW-COLUMN. In this example 7e = 00 (zero) and
      it's in-between values 20 and b0.
      The b0 is the final bit (and checksum), if 7e = 01 (one)
      then you have an extension block and require a 256 byte edid.
      These are also availeable the archive, but the difference is that
      you need to use 'write-edid-256.sh' instead of 'write-edid.sh'.

      Let's make an export to verify actual corruption first and
      also to help further research:

      09 sudo i2cdump -r 0-127 6 0x50 > EDID/edidexport.txt

      Or, if case you have a 256 byte edid:

      09 sudo i2cdump -r 0-255 6 0x50 > EDID/edidexport.txt

      Check the export by opening the .txt and copy/pasting the
      significant hex values to the Web Based EDID Reader website.
      The pasted values should be stripped of row and column id
      and the ascii characters to the right:

      example:
      ######################################
      00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 4d 10 ff 13 00 00 00 00
      00 17 01 04 a5 1d 11 78 06 de 50 a3 54 4c 99 26
      0f 50 54 00 00 00 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
      01 01 01 01 01 01 56 5e 00 a0 a0 a0 29 50 30 20
      35 00 26 a5 10 00 00 18 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 fc
      00 4c 51 31 33 33 54 31 4a 57 30 32 0a 20 00 b0
      ######################################

      If the EDID Reader says 'checksum valid' then do not proceed
      any further; the edid is fine and, thus, something else must be wrong ...

      If it says 'checksum fail' AND you have your bus AND address by now;
      skip the stuff below and proceed to step 10.

      If, on the other hand, you received all XX on all buses then 50 is not
      the right address for you ... we need to look beyond 50:

      09 sudo i2cdetect 6

      result:
      ######################################
      root@it:~# sudo i2cdetect 6
      WARNING! This program can confuse your I2C bus, cause data loss and worse!
      I will probe file /dev/i2c-6.
      I will probe address range 0x03-0x77.
      Continue? [Y/n] y
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f
      00: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      10: -- 11 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      20: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      30: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      40: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      50: 50 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      60: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      70: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
      root@it:~#
      ######################################

      So there IS something else here besides the edid at 50 ...
      Wonder what that button does ...
      Anyway; go back to the beginning of step 9 and redo the 'read bus',
      only this time at address 11 (or whatever your results were).

      ######################################

      10 cd EDID/edid-rw

      At this point we should have:
      - BUS (here 6)
      - ADDRESS (here 50)
      - EDID LENGTH 128 or 256 (here 128).

      11 sudo ./edid-rw 6 | edid-decode

      This is just a precaution; we want to make sure edid-rw uses the
      right address, if not then we need to change its code (report this if so).

      result:
      ######################################
      root@it:~/EDID/edid-rw# sudo ./edid-rw 6 | edid-decode
      Extracted contents:
      header: 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00
      serial number: 4d 10 ff 13 00 00 00 00 00 17
      version: 01 04
      basic params: a5 1d 11 78 06
      chroma info: de 50 a3 54 4c 99 26 0f 50 54
      established: 00 00 00
      standard: 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
      descriptor 1: 56 5e 00 a0 a0 a0 29 50 30 20 35 00 26 a5 10 00 00 18
      descriptor 2: 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      descriptor 3: 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      descriptor 4: 00 00 00 fc 00 4c 51 31 33 33 54 31 4a 57 30 32 0a 20
      extensions: 00
      checksum: b0

      Manufacturer: SHP Model 13ff Serial Number 0
      Made week 0 of 2013
      EDID version: 1.4
      Digital display
      8 bits per primary color channel
      DisplayPort interface
      Maximum image size: 29 cm x 17 cm
      Gamma: 2.20
      Supported color formats: RGB 4:4:4
      Default (sRGB) color space is primary color space
      First detailed timing is preferred timing
      Established timings supported:
      Standard timings supported:
      Detailed mode: Clock 241.500 MHz, 294 mm x 165 mm
      2560 2608 2640 2720 hborder 0
      1440 1443 1448 1481 vborder 0
      -hsync -vsync
      Dummy block
      Dummy block
      Monitor name: LQ133T1JW02
      Checksum: 0xb0
      EDID block does NOT conform to EDID 1.3!
      Missing monitor ranges
      root@it:~/EDID/edid-rw#

      ######################################

      Good, so we're looking at the same thing. If you've made it this far
      then we're pretty much finished.

      IF you have an edid address different from 50, then we need
      to change the write-edid.sh script accordingly (report this).
      If it is the standard address 50, then proceed:

      Let's rewrite the edid (the .bin you copied to the 'write-edid' folder).
      We'll presume it's called ABCDEF.bin. The actual tool it uses is i2cset
      (docs bookmarked), but this writes byte-for-byte, whereas
      the write-edid.sh script automates that (with address=50 pre-set).

      12 cd ..
      13 cd write-edid
      14 sudo bash ./write-edid.sh 6 ABCDEF.bin

      result:
      ######################################
      root@it:~/EDID/write-edid# sudo bash ./write-edid.sh 6 SHP13FFmod.bin
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x00
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x01
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x02
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x03
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x04
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x05
      Writing byte 0xFF to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x06
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x07
      Writing byte 0x30 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x08
      Writing byte 0xE4 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x09
      Writing byte 0x6C to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0a
      Writing byte 0x04 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0b
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0c
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0d
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0e
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x0f
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x10
      Writing byte 0x18 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x11
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x12
      Writing byte 0x04 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x13
      Writing byte 0xA5 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x14
      Writing byte 0x1D to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x15
      Writing byte 0x11 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x16
      Writing byte 0x78 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x17
      Writing byte 0x06 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x18
      Writing byte 0xDE to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x19
      Writing byte 0x50 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1a
      Writing byte 0xA3 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1b
      Writing byte 0x54 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1c
      Writing byte 0x4C to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1d
      Writing byte 0x99 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1e
      Writing byte 0x26 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x1f
      Writing byte 0x0F to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x20
      Writing byte 0x50 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x21
      Writing byte 0x54 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x22
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x23
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x24
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x25
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x26
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x27
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x28
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x29
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2a
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2b
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2c
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2d
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2e
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x2f
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x30
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x31
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x32
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x33
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x34
      Writing byte 0x01 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x35
      Writing byte 0x2A to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x36
      Writing byte 0x44 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x37
      Writing byte 0x80 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x38
      Writing byte 0xA0 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x39
      Writing byte 0x70 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3a
      Writing byte 0x38 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3b
      Writing byte 0x27 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3c
      Writing byte 0x40 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3d
      Writing byte 0x30 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3e
      Writing byte 0x20 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x3f
      Writing byte 0x35 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x40
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x41
      Writing byte 0x26 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x42
      Writing byte 0xA5 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x43
      Writing byte 0x10 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x44
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x45
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x46
      Writing byte 0x18 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x47
      Writing byte 0x56 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x48
      Writing byte 0x5E to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x49
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4a
      Writing byte 0xA0 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4b
      Writing byte 0xA0 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4c
      Writing byte 0xA0 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4d
      Writing byte 0x29 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4e
      Writing byte 0x50 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x4f
      Writing byte 0x30 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x50
      Writing byte 0x20 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x51
      Writing byte 0x35 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x52
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x53
      Writing byte 0x26 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x54
      Writing byte 0xA5 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x55
      Writing byte 0x10 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x56
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x57
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x58
      Writing byte 0x18 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x59
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5a
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5b
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5c
      Writing byte 0xFE to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5d
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5e
      Writing byte 0x4C to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x5f
      Writing byte 0x47 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x60
      Writing byte 0x20 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x61
      Writing byte 0x44 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x62
      Writing byte 0x69 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x63
      Writing byte 0x73 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x64
      Writing byte 0x70 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x65
      Writing byte 0x6C to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x66
      Writing byte 0x61 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x67
      Writing byte 0x79 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x68
      Writing byte 0x0A to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x69
      Writing byte 0x20 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6a
      Writing byte 0x20 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6b
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6c
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6d
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6e
      Writing byte 0xFE to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x6f
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x70
      Writing byte 0x4C to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x71
      Writing byte 0x50 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x72
      Writing byte 0x31 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x73
      Writing byte 0x37 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x74
      Writing byte 0x33 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x75
      Writing byte 0x57 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x76
      Writing byte 0x46 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x77
      Writing byte 0x34 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x78
      Writing byte 0x2D to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x79
      Writing byte 0x53 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7a
      Writing byte 0x50 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7b
      Writing byte 0x44 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7c
      Writing byte 0x31 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7d
      Writing byte 0x00 to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7e
      Writing byte 0x6B to bus 6, chip-adress 0x50, data-adress 0x7f
      Writing done, here is the output of i2cdump -y 6 0x50:
      No size specified (using byte-data access)
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f 0123456789abcdef
      00: 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 4d 10 ff 13 00 00 00 00 ........M?.?....
      10: 00 17 01 04 a5 1d 11 78 06 de 50 a3 54 4c 99 26 .??????x??P?TL?&
      20: 0f 50 54 00 00 00 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 ?PT...??????????
      30: 01 01 01 01 01 01 56 5e 00 a0 a0 a0 29 50 30 20 ??????V^.???)P0
      40: 35 00 26 a5 10 00 00 18 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 5.&??..?...?....
      50: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 10 00 00 .............?..
      60: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 fc ...............?
      70: 00 4c 51 31 33 33 54 31 4a 57 30 32 0a 20 00 b0 .LQ133T1JW02? .?
      80: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      90: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      a0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      b0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      c0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      d0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      e0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      f0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
      ######################################

      So ... it's the same edid ... Seems my eeprom is already
      write-protected (unfortunately, for me; it's be 75Hz otherwise).
      If successful then you should have a different edid than before
      and your panel is fixed.

      There's also a vcom eeprom, but let's not get into that right now.

      finish

      All correct edids collected so far are on the drive (folder 'home -> EDID -> archive'). Everything you need is there, including the instructions and the edid tools.
    Good Luck and Enjoy 980m in AW18 ;)
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 8, 2016
  2. GTO_PAO11

    GTO_PAO11 Notebook Deity

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    Nice tutorial. This need to be stickied.
     
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  3. Shekelstein

    Shekelstein Notebook Enthusiast

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    Pointer: it won't work with 70W heatsinks, only 100W.
     
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  4. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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  5. Scanner

    Scanner Notebook Deity

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    1Schumsta1,

    This is awesome, I just updated my 18 today and it was a pain in the backside.


    I had already installed 8.1 a week ago. When I changed the bios and installed the cards it was a no go. I had to go back down to win 7, change bios use USB to install 8.1, had to change hdd from MBR to GPT, before win 8 would install, did it with command prompt while at boot-what fun. I did a clean install. Again thanks for those picks of the heat sink mods, I used a flat head screw driver to file those spots down. Had to use the IC Diamond paste that came with cards, ran out of Liquid Ultra. Got my cards from Ted at Hidevolution, also got new SLI ribbon. Using driver 347.09 gotten from Laptopvideo2go.com.
     
  6. imest

    imest Notebook Enthusiast

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    What does the AW 18 come with? 70W heat sinks?
     
  7. Scanner

    Scanner Notebook Deity

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    I think it depends on what card you had. The Aw 18s that came with 780/880 card have three copper pipes 100w, and thing before 2 copper pipes and less watts. I could be totally wrong, but that's what I think.
     
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  8. 1Schumsta1

    1Schumsta1 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I just made some tests with 980ms... @Mr. Fox. I hope you have enough Tests and information yet :D

    Single:
    Single_Kboost_noOC.jpg Single_Kboost_OC.jpg Single_noKboost_noOC.jpg Single_noKboost_OC.jpg
     
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  9. 1Schumsta1

    1Schumsta1 Notebook Enthusiast

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    SLI:
    SLI_Kboost_noOC.jpg SLI_Kboost_OC.jpg SLI_noKboost_noOC.jpg SLI_noKboost_OC.jpg

    Sorry for 2 posts, but only 6 Attachments per post ;)
     
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  10. reborn2003

    reborn2003 THE CHIEF!

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    Hey 1Schumsta1,

    Nice post! Great job:thumbsup:

    I was just wondering which hwinfo version you were running and also what fan RPM speeds you have available when you run hwinfo?
    ATM mine only give me 1800RPM and 3700RPM for the CPU
    Then 1700RPM and 3500RPM for GPU 1
    and 1700RPM and 3300RPM for GPU 2.

    I was hoping to get more fan speed RPM ranges so that I could use say 3000RPM speed as my max instead of 3500RPM.

    Cheers. :)
     
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