Space News - Live and Recorded Video, Articles, etc

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    TsENKI Cosmodromes of Russia (Russian)
    "Spaceports of Russia" in Chile (English)


    The video has nothing to do with Chile, but it has English audio + English subtitles.
     
  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Removal in the fog

    Published on Mar 21, 2018
    The clip "Removal in the fog" about the export to the launching complex and the installation of a space rocket in the launch vehicle of the Soyuz-FG launch vehicle and the Soyuz MS-08 transport manned spacecraft.

    "Hawaii" - the eve of the launch

    Published on Mar 20, 2018
    Baikonur is completing preparations for the launch of the manned spacecraft Soyuz MS-08. The callsign of the crew is "Hawaii". Start - the evening of March 21, the day of the spring equinox - the beginning of the astronomical spring.
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Soyuz MS-08 launch (NASA English)


    Launch of the FCS Soyuz-FG with the TPK Soyuz MS-08


    Published on Mar 21, 2018
    On March 21, 2018, at 20:44 Moscow time, the Soyuz-FG space rocket with the Soyuz MS-08 manned spacecraft with the long-term expedition ISS-55/56 on board was successfully launched from the Baikonur launch site # 1 launcher. The commander spacecraft, Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev, flight engineers, astronauts NASA Andrew Foistel (commander of the expedition ISS-56) and Richard Arnold.

    Launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket with the Soyuz MS-08 TPK (HD compilation)
    Published on Mar 21, 2018
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Docking of Crewed Soyuz MS-08 to International Space Station
    Starts @ 04:00

    Streamed live 10 hours ago
    When: March 23rd 2018 at 19:41 UTC, 15:41 New York Time
    What: Soyuz MS-08 Russian Spacecraft Docks to International Space Station
    Where: International Space Station

    A Russian Soyuz MS-08 spacecraft will dock to the International Space Station on Friday, March 23rd at19:41 UTC. The craft is carrying Russian Soyuz commander Oleg Artemyev and NASA astronauts Andrew J. Feustel and Richard R. Arnold.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Launch of Falcon 9 with Iridium NEXT Flight 5 from VAFB
    Live in 3 days, March 29, 7:15 AM
    Scheduled for Mar 29, 2018
    When: March 29th 2018 at 14:19 UTC, 10:19 New York Time
    What: Launch of Falcon 9 with the Iridium NEXT 5 Mission
    Where: SLC-4, Vandenberg Air Force Base CA


    SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch From Cape Canaveral Scheduled For Monday, April 2
    Published on Mar 25, 2018
    SpaceX has announced that it will launch a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Monday, April 2. Launch window will open at 4:30 p.m. ET.
    The CRS-14 mission will help resupply the International Space Station and will be the 14th operational cargo delivery flight to the ISS.Coverage of the launch can be seen on
     
  6. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, controversial payload, adding useless space junk, while the site clearly shows it's supposed to generate good vibes :)

    It's coming back down, or already has, need to follow up on it.

    I think it's cool, but again it is junk and was "unscheduled" / "unannounced", so it makes "Space People" nervous, like what else would happen should this go unchallenged.

    They are right, there are going to be lots more groups or individuals with orbital launch capability moving into the future, so it could get dangerous - someone could get unlucky - and well conceived happy thought payloads could turn into a disaster - costly damage to in orbit critical systems, or Earth collateral damage resulting from re-entry.

    It's fun that things we all dreamed about in the 60's, 70's, and moving forward are coming into the possible. :)
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    No Falcon Way: NASA to stick with SLS, SpaceX more like space ex
    US cosmo-boffins: Never mind the cost, feel the payload
    By Richard Speed 29 Mar 2018 at 01:01
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/03/29/nasa_sls_spacex/

    "NASA has categorically stated it will not dump the troubled Space Launch System (SLS) in favor of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy any time soon.

    The SLS is competing with the James Webb Space Telescope for the mission most delayed and over-budget.

    Answering a question from Shuttle Mission Control veteran Wayne Hale, NASA’s Human Spaceflight head honcho Bill Gerstenmaier said SpaceX's Falcon was not an option for Uncle Sam's space agency since it simply could not lob enough metal into the heavens in one go:

    Wayne Hale asks why not buy some Falcon Heavy launches in lieu of SLS, given FH’s lower costs.

    Gerstenmaier: FH capacity still a lot smaller than any SLS version; we’ll need that for large volume, monolithic pieces.
    — Jeff Foust (@jeff_foust) March 26, 2018

    The question was asked during a scheduled meeting of the NASA Advisory Council this week, following the successful demonstration launch of Falcon Heavy earlier in the year.

    With the SLS snaffling the best part of a $2bn per year funding pot, and SpaceX supremo Elon Musk estimating that a Falcon Heavy would cost $150m “at most,” it doesn’t take NASA-level genius to work out that one SLS equals, er, a lot of Falcon Heavy fire sticks. On the other hand, NASA reckons SLS is more bang for its bucks.

    The performance numbers in this database are not accurate. In process of being fixed. Even if they were, a fully expendable Falcon Heavy, which far exceeds the performance of a Delta IV Heavy, is $150M, compared to over $400M for Delta IV Heavy.
    — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 12, 2018

    While the first iteration of SLS will loft a payload only slightly heavier that a Falcon Heavy can carry, forthcoming versions will be able to dump considerably heavier gear [PDF] onto a trans-lunar injection trajectory to the Moon, with the final version able to loft 45,000 kg, compared to the 16,800 kg SpaceX reckons its launcher can send to Mars.

    A cynic might suggest that just three launches of a Falcon Heavy would do the job of the most powerful version of the SLS, but NASA has an answer for this. The Lunar Orbital Platform Gateway will have modules so large that nothing but a SLS will do.

    There are a few problems with this statement.

    The first is that the Lunar Orbital Platform Gateway is still very much on the drawing board, so there is no reason why it could not be designed to be launched in smaller pieces.

    The second is that former astronaut Richard Mastracchio (now Senior Director of Operations for Commercial Resupply Services at Orbital ATK) remarked at a lecture given in the UK at the weekend that Lunar Orbital Platform Gateway would likely be constructed from Space Station-derived modules.

    The heaviest module on the Space Station is the Japanese Kibo lab, weighing in at 15,900 kg.

    The third is that NASA moved away from single Skylab-style launches some time ago, and now has far more experience with the modular building techniques used for the Space Station.

    Skylab was, of course, nearly lost during launch as unexpected airflow tore off a meteoroid shield and one of the solar panels.

    Gerstenmaier finished on more conciliatory tone, restating NASA’s position that it was not a case of ‘Or’, but ‘And’, with there being plenty of room for Musk’s trio of thrust tubes as well as the wares of Jeff Bezos and the other commercial launch vendors.

    Until the SLS finally launches and demonstrates its value, this question is unlikely to be going away any time soon."

    Comments

    Exciting times, many options, many directions, funding for SpaceX coming from NASA is important, but delivering large body dimension and weight objects via SLS makes sense too.

    But, why aren't they talking about the SpaceX BFR?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BFR_(rocket)

    I just wish we'd stop "blowing things up", and discover better ground to orbit solutions. ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
    t456 likes this.
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    NASA stalls $8bn James Webb Space Telescope again – this time to 2020
    Someone call Scotty – he'd know how to fix this thing
    By Iain Thomson in San Francisco 27 Mar 2018 at 20:35
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/03/27/nasa_delays_james_webb_space_telescope_2020/
    "[​IMG]
    Delayed ... The James Webb Space Telescope
    The launch date for the James Webb Space Telescope has been kicked back a year to 2020, NASA confirmed during a press conference on Tuesday.

    The instrument – a 6,200kg (13,668lb) telescope designed to look at stars formed soon after the Big Bang as well as closer objects – was scheduled to launch into the heavens in October this year. Technical problems pushed that back to May 2019. Now NASA says that will slip to May 2020 at the earliest, and indicated that the $8bn plowed into the project may not be enough to complete it.

    “With all the flight hardware 100 per cent complete, we’re approaching the finish line for launch readiness. However, it looks like we have a ways to go before we cross that finish line,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA associate administrator for science.

    The telescope is being put together by Northrop Grumman. The team has run into various problems, particularly with the propulsion system. In testing, a transducer was found to be incorrectly powered and in need of replacement, which set the project back three months.

    A section of the propulsion unit was also found to have used the incorrect solvent, so certain valves had to be stripped out and replaced. A catalytic heater was also accidentally "overstressed," and had to be ripped out and replaced.

    Dennis Andrucyk, deputy associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, said these were avoidable errors, however, they happened because humans are human, and, well, we all make mistakes.

    To operate effectively, the telescope needs to be kept cool from the Sun's light, regardless of whether it is direct sunlight or reflected from the Earth and Moon. To do this, the 'scope will be shrouded in five layers of material, each the size of a tennis court when laid out.

    During testing, deploying the Sun shield was expected to take two weeks, but in fact took a month. Folding it back up and stowing it was also supposed to take two weeks, and again took a month. That means the instrument will be exposed to sunlight longer than expected, which will affect its operation while in space.

    The cables intended to keep the Sun shield in place were worryingly slack, it was discovered, so engineers have added springs and other new hardware to keep them taut enough to do the job. The eggheads also noted seven tears in the shield, none bigger than four inches. These need to be restitched, and the cause of the tearing needs to be locked down.

    Here come the accountants
    NASA has a problem. It's running short of cash. If it goes one dollar over the $8bn allocated to the entire project, the 'scope's extra funding will have to be reauthorized by US Congress.

    Acting NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot said an independent review board has been appointed to investigate and tally up the costs. It will report in June. The project is expected to overrun its budget.

    "From analysis we know the most obvious answers on funding are wrong," Lightfoot said. "You can’t just multiply the historical funding run rate with the extra time needed to finish and get a figure. The run rate slowing down rapidly as we reach the completion of the project."

    While it's unlikely that Congress would pull the plug on the project at this late stage, there is precedent for politicians to cut off funding – in 1993, after spending $2bn on the Superconducting Super Collider. The SSC would have had three times the power of CERN's Large Hadron Collider. It was sold off, and the site is being used as a datacenter instead.

    NASA is also making personnel changes: four senior managers from the space agency's Goddard center will be stationed at Northrop Grumman to help iron out the wrinkles with the project, and the European Space Agency will also lend a hand.

    Although Hubble will remain operational into the mid-2020s, the James Webb telescope is a different kind of beast and a much more powerful one. As it's going to be positioned a million miles from Earth, repairs in space will be impossible so it needs to work right first time and stay working. That requires a lot of testing and engineering time, yet Congress could decide it's had enough of the whole thing.

    Lightfoot indicated NASA may have money in a rainy day fund to finish the project, if necessary, but that would throw other experiments and instruments into doubt. We'll know in June what the final bill will be."

    Comments
     
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Iridium-5 Mission
    SpaceX
    Live March 30, 2018 7:13am PT, in about 30 minutes...
    Scheduled for Mar 30, 2018
    SpaceX is targeting Friday, March 30 for a Falcon 9 launch of the Iridium-5 NEXT mission from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. This is the fifth set of 10 satellites in a series of 75 total satellites that SpaceX will launch for Iridium’s next generation global satellite constellation, Iridium® NEXT. The instantaneous launch opportunity is at 7:13 a.m. PDT or 14:13 UTC and the satellites will begin deployment about an hour after launch.
    A backup instantaneous launch opportunity is available on Saturday, March 31 at 7:08 a.m. PDT or 14:08 UTC.
    Falcon 9’s first stage for the Iridium-5 mission previously supported the Iridium-3 mission from SLC-4E in October 2017. SpaceX will not attempt to recover Falcon 9’s first stage after launch.


    Launch of Falcon 9 with Iridium NEXT Flight 5 from VAFB
    Scheduled for Mar 30, 2018, Live in about 15 minutes...

    When: March 30th 2018 at 14:13 UTC, 10:13 New York Time
    What: Launch of Falcon 9 with the Iridium NEXT 5 Mission
    Where: SLC-4, Vandenberg Air Force Base CA
    SpaceX will launch a Falcon 9 rocket from SLC-4 of Vandenberg Air Force Base at 14:13 UTC, March 30th 2018 carrying another 10 Iridium satellites under the NEXT Mission 5 flight.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2018
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