Space News - Live and Recorded Video, Articles, etc

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    MY GOD, IT'S FULL OF CARS: SpaceX thrusts Tesla into orbit (just don't mention the barge)
    Falcon Heavy blasts off, 2 boosters return, 1... MIA
    By Iain Thomson in San Francisco 6 Feb 2018 at 22:11
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/06/spacex_falcon_heavy_launch/
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    Musk pulls it off again ... Massive three-in-one Falcon Heavy erection blasts into space

    After years of setbacks, SpaceX today successfully launched its Falcon Heavy three-in-one rocket and delivered its cherry-red payload into orbit – Elon Musk's very own Tesla Roadster.

    After a morning of delays due to high winds, the mighty rocket lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39, in Florida, USA, at 1245pm PT (2045 UTC) with no problems. Its 27 engines, bunched into three rockets, throttled up, and lifted its experimental payload to the heavens.

    Two minutes and thirty seconds into the flight, two of these booster rockets peeled off, leaving just a central stage hurtling into the obsidian void with a Tesla strapped to it. The pair of side rockets landed vertically in tandem at the space center on Earth eight minutes after launch.
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    No, this is real, not science fiction ... Falcon rockets land back on Earth after launch

    Shortly afterwards, the remaining central stage separated from its payload and began the long trip back to Earth. It was due to land on the autonomous barge, Of Course I Still Love You, floating in the Atlantic ocean, but so far SpaceX hasn't confirmed if it landed in one piece. There are rumors the rocket, and the barge it was supposed to land on, were destroyed after the rocket motors failed. SpaceX staff spoke of losing "the central core."

    As this was a test flight, no one was going to risk an actual satellite, so the payload was Musk's personal Tesla Roadster, painted a custom cherry red color. In the front seat was a dummy wearing a SpaceX-designed spacesuit, at least that's what we're told. Some have speculated this is a foolproof way to dump a dead body. No further comment.

    Musk, who also oversees Tesla as well as SpaceX, tweeted video footage of his flash motor from space:

    View from SpaceX Launch Control. Apparently, there is a car in orbit around Earth. pic.twitter.com/QljN2VnL1O

    — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 6, 2018

    In the Roadster was a mini version of the same car, also with a mini-dummy installed, for extra public relations goodness. In the glove box was a crystal inscribed with words from a favorite book series of Musk's, Isaac Asimov's Foundation. The Roadster was also playing David Bowie's Space Oddity, not that anyone could hear it, and the dashboard touchscreen displayed a quote from Douglas Adams. Nooice.
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    Has anyone seen the head of ULA recently? Musk's Roadster before it was launched into orbit

    The entire payload is heading to Mars, where SpaceX supremo Musk hopes to set up an outpost of humanity. The car is circling Earth and will be pushed into an extremely large elliptical orbit of the Sun, swinging it through the solar system for a Mars flyby – and hopefully it won't crash into our probes around the Red Planet.

    After spending five hours in orbit of Earth, a booster attached to the Roadster will begin a final burn that will boost the package Marswards. Any aliens who encounter it along the way will no doubt conclude that humans are crazy.
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    'Er, this is the GCU Arbitrary - you're not going to believe what they've done this time...'

    The Falcon Heavy is now officially the most powerful rocket flying today, capable of hefting 63,800kg (140,660lb) into low-Earth orbit, 26,700kg (58,860lb) into a geostationary orbit, or 16,800kg (37,040lb) to the Red Planet. The Falcon Heavy won’t be used for manned flights to Mars: that's going to be the job of its successor, the Big ****ing Rocket.

    So, in short, what SpaceX has created here is a heavy lifter capable of expanding the International Space Station or building the next orbiting science lab, since the ISS is due for retirement and will de-orbit in little under a decade.

    Wow that #SpaceX launch, huh? Amazing what you can do with technology when smart folks aren't screwing around making Instagram filters etc

    — The Register (@TheRegister) February 6, 2018

    But that's all in the future. For the moment Elon's Musketeers have set a new bar for modern reusable orbital delivery in terms of the amount of heft available and the cost per kilogram. Even if one of the rockets didn’t make it safely back to Earth, the cost of orbital delivery has been slashed by economies of scale and reuse."
     
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  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    This event is making new page of space history, but I missed seeing the 3rd booster landing on the ocean base.
     
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  3. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) Sir Pumpkin Longshanks

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    I read the 3rd booster missed the landing by 100m and went into the sea, Is this correct?
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    We still don't know what happened, I'm sure at some point they'll release info on the status of the central booster and landing... :)
    aqua4.gif
     
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  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The middle booster of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket failed to land on its drone ship
    By Loren Grush@lorengrush Feb 6, 2018, 6:39pm EST
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/6/16980954/spacex-falcon-heavy-rocket-middle-core-failed-landing
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    Though the Falcon Heavy’s outer cores successfully landed after launch this afternoon, the middle core of SpaceX’s huge rocket missed the drone ship where it was supposed to land, a source tells The Verge. SpaceX later confirmed The Verge’s reporting in a press conference.

    The center core was only able to relight one of the three engines necessary to land, and so it hit the water at 300 miles per hour about 300 feet from the drone ship. As a result, two engines on the drone ship were taken out when it crashed, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said in a press call after the rocket launch. “[It] was enough to take out two thrusters and shower the deck with shrapnel,” he said.

    It’s a small hiccup in an otherwise successful first flight. The Falcon Heavy rocket took off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 3:45PM ET on Tuesday and made a beautiful arc to space. About two and a half minutes after liftoff, the two outer boosters of the rocket broke away and returned to Earth. The pair then touched down just seconds apart on SpaceX’s two ground landing pads at the Cape called Landing Zone 1 and Landing Zone 2.

    At about three minutes after liftoff, the center core broke away from the upper stage — the top portion of the rocket that is carrying the Falcon Heavy’s payload, Musk’s Tesla Roadster. It then attempted to land on SpaceX’s drone ship, but live video of the landing stalled just before the core was slated to make its touchdown. “We lost the center core,” someone said on a separate, unlisted live stream of the launch.

    Audio: “We lost the center core” #FalconHeavy @SpaceXpic.twitter.com/OaJhMa7f2U
    — Drew King (@King_Drew16) February 6, 2018

    Meanwhile, the upper stage seems to be doing just fine. After launch, Musk tweeted that it had successfully ignited its engine and raised its orbit as intended.

    Now, the upper stage will spend about six hours coasting through space — a move by SpaceX to demonstrate a tricky orbital maneuver for the US Air Force.

    That coast will take the rocket through regions of intense radiation that surround Earth called the Van Allen belts, where it will be pelted by high-energy particles. If the vehicle is still operating as it should by then, the upper stage will do another engine burn, putting the car on its deep space path to Mars’ orbit.

    Update February 6th, 7:10PM ET: Added SpaceX confirmation of our reporting, and details on what went wrong.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2018
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Elon Musk’s Tesla overshot Mars’ orbit and is headed to the asteroid belt
    Deeper space
    By Loren Grush@lorengrush Feb 6, 2018, 11:45pm EST
    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/6/1...y-roadster-orbit-asteroid-belt-elon-musk-mars

    "Elon Musk’s Tesla roadster, which launched on top of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy earlier today, is going farther out into the Solar System than originally planned.

    The car was supposed to be put on a path around the Sun that would take the vehicle out to the distance of Mars’ orbit. But the rocket carrying the car seems to have overshot that trajectory and has put the Tesla in an orbit that extends out into the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

    After launch, the Tesla cruised through space for a good six hours — a trip that was also live streamed by SpaceX. This “coast” phase was meant to show off a special orbital maneuver for the US Air Force, before the rocket completed one final engine burn in space and put the car on its final orbit. It looks like that burn might have happened somewhere over southern California, as some people in the area started reporting sightings of the rocket igniting in the night sky after 9:30PM ET.

    Third burn successful. Exceeded Mars orbit and kept going to the Asteroid Belt.pic.twitter.com/bKhRN73WHF
    — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 7, 2018
    DVZ0h3YW4AIc-9w.jpg
    But now it seems that engine ignition worked a little too well. SpaceX CEO Musk tweeted out a map of the roadster’s final orbit after the burn, showing just how far out the car will travel. And it looks like it’s going so far into the asteroid belt that it will get relatively close to the orbit of the dwarf planet Ceres.

    It’s unclear what exactly will happen to the car: Before the Tesla launched, Musk said that there was an extremely tiny chance that the vehicle would ever hit Mars. But there’s been no clarification about how this new path will affect the car’s chances of running into some other space object.

    And planetary scientists on Twitter want more answers about the exact orbit to calculate the Tesla’s odds of collision, and how long it will actually last in deep space.

    The Tesla’s journey certainly demonstrates the Falcon Heavy’s capabilities of putting objects into deep space. Plus, some space companies, like Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries, are working on technologies to mine water from asteroids someday. They might be happy to know that the Falcon Heavy is capable of sending their spacecraft into the asteroid belt."
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2018
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The amazing moment SpaceX simultaneously lands TWO boosters back on Earth after launching a Tesla Roadster to Mars on the world's largest rocket (but the third may have missed its target)
    * 'Falcon Heavy' has finally blasted off from Cape Canaveral in a historic launch for Elon Musk's SpaceX
    * The massive three-core rocket is carrying Musk's red Tesla Roadster, with a dummy inside dubbed Starman
    * Powered by 27 engines, the rocket features three reusable cores, two of which were filmed returning to Earth
    * Footage tracking center core cut out before it could be seen landing, reports claim it missed the drone ship
    By Annie Palmer and Harry Pettit and Cheyenne MacDonald for dailymail.com
    PUBLISHED: 19:09 EST, 6 February 2018 | UPDATED: 19:36 EST, 6 February 2018
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...osters-land-simultaneously-rocket-launch.html

    "As if SpaceX's successful Falcon Heavy launch wasn't impressive enough, the firm managed to complete another remarkable feat as the megarocket blasted off to Mars.

    Stunning video from today's launch shows the twin boosters returning to Cape Canaveral in a synchronized landing.

    The massive rocket launched at 3:45 p.m. ET, carrying Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster on board.

    Just over three minutes into the launch, the side boosters detached from the rocket and launch operators confirmed the rocket was on the right trajectory.

    After shedding from the core section of the rocket, the two reusable side boosters landed seamlessly back on Earth about eight minutes into the launch.

    In a groundbreaking first for SpaceX, the firm said it would attempt a triple landing of the Falcon Heavy's booster engines.

    The third booster, which is the rocket's center stage, was supposed to detach from the rocket, cut back through the atmosphere and land itself on an autonomous drone ship, dubbed 'Of Course I Still Love You,' that's stationed out in the Atlantic Ocean.

    The rocket appeared to have successfully jettisoned the core, but SpaceX's live stream cut out before it was able to show the center stage returning to the sea-faring platform.

    A source told the Verge that the middle core missed the drone ship where it was supposed to land, but SpaceX has yet to confirm this publicly.
    48F04B5100000578-5356825-image-a-31_1517950740437.jpg
    In an incredible accomplishment, the Falcon Heavy's side boosters landed smoothly back down to Earth on two separate launchpads about 8 minutes in. 'The Falcons have landed' the announcers said, as people cheered and whooped wildly in the background"

    Lots more fun stuff in the article...
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2018
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Elon Musk celebrates successful Falcon Heavy rocket launch

    Published on Feb 6, 2018
    The SpaceX founder and CEO held a press conference hours after the Falcon Heavy successfully launched from Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday. Watch his remarks here.
     
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  9. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  10. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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