Software/Utility to Change Sector Size

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by vaio.phil, Jun 9, 2021.

  1. vaio.phil

    vaio.phil Notebook Evangelist

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    My new 1TB NVMe SSD is using the 512 byte sector size. What software/utility do you guys use to change the 512 to 4k size? (on the fly... without having to reformat the SSD or reinstall Windows 10)
    (Dell XPS 15 9570)
    Thanks
     
  2. vaio.phil

    vaio.phil Notebook Evangelist

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    Ok.... cancel the idea. I read more and there's probably no performance gain doing this lol
     
  3. Spartan@HIDevolution

    Spartan@HIDevolution Company Representative

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  4. vaio.phil

    vaio.phil Notebook Evangelist

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    Thank you Spartan! I think your post was indeed the one i read earlier and then figured the 512 size might work for me (not a sizable speed difference). My drive is aligned (got an integer when divided by 4096). Anyways below is my latest crystaldiskmark numbers. I was trying to get my row 3 RND4K Q32T1-Write to be higher but i might be stuck with this. I have tried AHCI vs RAID/RST, have enabled/added large cache in the registry, etc. My rows 1 and 2 numbers might be fine. Would you know is there something that i can do to make my rows 3 (and 4) better or is this just about my laptop/SSD limitation? Thanks.

    CrystalDiskMark Dell XPS 15 9570 SK Hynix Gold P31 1TB Intel RST Test 5.png
     
  5. Espionage724

    Espionage724 Notebook Guru

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    Edit: This is with 512 sector format. Will do some testing between it and 4K at some point today.

    I have a P31 Gold as well. In CrystalDiskMark, I did Settings -> NVMe SSD (instead of Default):

    [​IMG]

    This is on an ASUS PRIME X470-PRO with NVMe in non-RAID mode (Standard NVM Express Controller driver in Windows).
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2021
  6. N2ishun

    N2ishun Notebook Consultant

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    CrystalDiskMark.jpg CrystalDiskMark_20210815121046.jpg
    Strange differences.
    I am using Samsungs nvme driver, perhaps that accounts for it ?
    Untagged is diskmark set to nvme.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2021
  7. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    CDM is fine for apples to apples comparisons but, what do your real world file moves look like?

    for instance I have 2 different NVME drives in my laptop.

    BPX Pro 1TB maxes at ~1GB/s
    CS3030 1TB maxes at ~1.5GB/s

    Both are rated for 3GB/s and have the same controller Phison E12.

    [​IMG]

    So, as you can see they perform mostly the same for Reads and Writes the BPX takes the lead. Same chips / PCB / controller /etc. But you can see differences and the BPX

    Also, the usable space is considerably different as both are marketed as 1TB drives... Well, I suppose the BPX technically is marketed as 960GB.

    [​IMG]

    Not going to complain though since they were $100-$130/drive compared to Samsung prices it's a steal.
     
  8. StormJumper

    StormJumper Notebook Virtuoso

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    The only gain would be from x86 to x64 O/S that gives the system larger memory access as to the sector that is one reason you want to upgrade to or go with Windows 10x64 to get better performance out of your NVMe drive.
     
  9. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    I don't think anyone is using x86 in its pure form anymore other than a handful of stragglers in the wild. Or hardware devices that don't support x64 architecture.
     
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