Should I get a new gaming laptop?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by sidg666, Nov 16, 2021.

  1. sidg666

    sidg666 Notebook Consultant

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    Hi guys,

    I currently use a Asus GL502-VSK with a 7th gen i7, 16 GB RAM and GTX 1070 for gaming and work. I bought the computer in summer 2017 and it's working great. However, lately few things have been going wrong here and there. First the battery started to swell. I don't know what causes it but regardless I had to remove it to keep my computer safe. So I am working from the wall socket now. After that the internal CMOS battery ran out. I will have to replace that soon if I want the internal clock to stay synchronized. Now none of these are too severe and haven't proved troublesome to deal and are probably expected after all this time. But I do not have enough expertise to know if these should be considered directly coupled with the main components of the machine that allow the computer to be a computer and to process data and calculations like mobo/cpu/gpu/etc.

    So with that context, is there any probability that the important guts will start failing sooner rather than later?

    Another thing I am considering is that even if I think about the above and buy a new laptop, I don't want that right after I buy it, AMD/NVIDIA introduce a new amazing graphics card with great AI/graphics processing/etc. I don't keep up with the market so can someone give input on this. Is buying right now good or is something even better just around the corner?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    HW sounds fine, batteries are meant to die over time. $100 for CMOS / Main battery vs more power for $1000.

    If you're considering W11 then it's advised to upgrade since 8th gen and newer provide less hassle in the upgrade process.

    If you're going to spend the money I would wait until Alder Lake 12th gen laptops get released in a couple of months and that should last longer in terms of aging technology. The boost of the internal upgrades that come along with AL will also perform faster in terms of bandwidth to the components connected to them. I.E. RAM / GPU / NVME's

    As to the battery swelling it just happens over time as they age and go through charge / discharge cycles. Similar to your car battery slow death over years of use. Phones can have the same issue as well.
     
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  3. sidg666

    sidg666 Notebook Consultant

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    Sorry could you please rephrase that? I didn't quite understand.

    Thanks for the info.

    When will AL laptops be available? I only found info on AL chips being released earlier this month. I'll probably check here again around the time recommended by you to see if anything else has changed that is worth considering.

    I'm not too keen on upgrading to Windows 11. Rumors are that it's subscription based. Is that true?
     
  4. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Deity

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    W11 is the same as W10 but visually different IMO more looks like Mac at first look. Even through it's officially released earlier this month it's still a WIP to iron out things. I haven't had any issues with using it so far that aren't easily fixable with a reboot.

    AL laptops sound like a launch Jan/Feb if the past trends prevail for Intel release patterns. Not too far off to wait for a dramatic / worthwhile HW upgrade.

    On the desktop side PCIE 3 >> 5 = 4X the bandwidth for the X16 slot, DDR5 option (if you can find it / pay for it), and DMI upgraded from 3.0 to 4.0 which doubles the bandwidth for things like drives / peripherals to reduce the chance of bottlenecking things during high use.

    Laptop improvements outside of the CPU being 1.5X faster than your current one is the sure bet. The RAM situation might level out by then for DDR5 but, the price vs performance are about equal with the first release and not really worth the premium pricing for the RAM and the MOBO to support it. I opted to stick DD4 / MOBO ~$310 total vs DDR5/MOBO would have been ~$500 .

    Not too sure what base configurations on laptops will run though but, w/o a high power GPU I kind of expect there to be some I7-H options to come in around $1000 maybe and self upgrade from there. I picked up my current 9750H for $740 2 years ago. It took some hunting around and stalking to get it at that price though. I was looking to get something with dual NVME slots and ended up with this unknown to me Clevo / Sager laptop. I like to be cutting edge but, cheaper about it than going for the fully loaded options out there running in the $2K range. I'm rebuilding my 8700K server from the ground up and only porting over a few things and with a 12700K it's totaling out at ~$1500 w/ dual 1TB NVME's for OS in Raid 1 ($170/ea) and porting over my storage array / networking setup from one chassis to the new one. But includes the MOBO / PSU / Case / RAM / Fans (overkill 10 pack of fans) / air cooler / sata power for 5 drives in a single cable / graphite pad for CPU instead of paste / etc.
     
  5. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The January launch for Tiger Lake was for their low-power processors. H45, the only ones worth getting for gaming laptops, didn't debut until May. Figure at least that point for Alder Lake mobile chips with 6+ cores, with any real inventory not being available for at least several weeks, if not months, later.
     
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