Sandy Bridge i3/i5/i5 upgrade - avoid the one that overheats

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by GoodSir, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. GoodSir

    GoodSir Newbie

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    Members of this forum have already helped me to make a choice between different DDR3 combinations.
    Next in line would be the CPU, which will be the last modification.
    The laptop in question is Dell n4050:

    - Intel B815
    - Intel HD Graphics (G2 Pentium/Celeron 1.1/1.15 GHz) Dell(1028 0502) 786MB
    - Sandy Bridge HM67 Motherboard
    - Samsung PM851 256GB SSD
    - 2x4GB DDR3 1333MHz, Kingston

    I have been given an offer to switch the above mentioned feeble processor to a much normal iteration of the Sandy Bridge architecture. The offer, given by a small local shop/repair service, is one of the following CPUs: the i3-2350m for 20$, the i5-2450m for 40$, the i7-2640m for 50$, or even the quad-core i7-2670qm for 50$.

    I am planning to use this machine as a secondary computer. Just for regular work, nothing professional nor business related. But, I am still tempted to buy the i7 CPU, just to see hot fast one of the top dual-core 2nd gen processors is. The only thing that worries me is will the i7 CPU overheat while processing basic tasks? Watching 1080p streams? Is it a smart choice? The shop will not charge me if the processor doesn't work inside my computer. Therefore I am not burdened by that. The only thing worrying me now is the emission of heat.

    The current Celeron CPU actually heats a lot during hot summer days. But, just for example, when the air is cooler, the software monitoring the CPU temperature never showes more than 72 C. And that is when I intentionally push it to the limit.
    Will the dual-core i7 overheat? If I'm not mistaken, it is rated at 35W, therefore should perform similarly?
     
  2. Arrrrbol

    Arrrrbol Notebook Geek

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    Its unlikely the temperature will be an issue. If anything you will have lower temperatures if you are going to use a higher quality thermal paste than the crap they put on in the factory.
     
  3. Starlight5

    Starlight5 I'm a cat. What else is there to say, really?

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    @GoodSir Pentium/Celeron generally tend to run cooler, despite same TDP. I'd try i7 2670qm, and return it if it runs too hot.
     
  4. GoodSir

    GoodSir Newbie

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    @Starlight5
    Could I, for example, use the Win10 option which limits the CPU power and somehow "tame" the, otherwise high (45W) TDP, quad-core? It would still be quad-core.
    I truly don't need all the power that CPU has. Sometimes maybe, but for daily tasks no. Still, I am very eager to buy it and keep it.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2017
  5. Starlight5

    Starlight5 I'm a cat. What else is there to say, really?

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    @GoodSir you could use ThrottleStop or Intel XTU to undervolt the system; restrict frequencies only if undervolting isn't enough. Or just get a cheaper i5 CPU - something in $20 range.
     
  6. GoodSir

    GoodSir Newbie

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    Ok, thank you.
    This might sound as a stupid question, but mind you, I am no expert. Will the lower voltages, and all other such modifications, put a strain on the system in the long run?
     
  7. Starlight5

    Starlight5 I'm a cat. What else is there to say, really?

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    @GoodSir if it's stable, the system will work better in the long run; if it's unstable, you won't be able to use it. There are no cons to (reasonable) undervolting, only pros.
     
  8. GoodSir

    GoodSir Newbie

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    Ok, understood.
    After you mentioned that an i5 should be about 20$, I searched some local online classifieds and found one. I wasn't aware that it sells for much less than what the shop was asking. After that, I have decided to narrow down my choice to the i5-2450m, but from a private seller, and that quad-core i7 for 50$. I fail to grasp the idea that I should pay 50$ for the dual core i7, since it just looks like a faster i5.

    My guess is that the i5 should do the job without any problems whatsoever.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
    Starlight5 likes this.
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