Running Windows on a Mac: Boot Camp, Parallels Desktop & VMware Fusion

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by Sam, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. Karamazovmm

    Karamazovmm Overthinking? Always!

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  2. RMXO

    RMXO Notebook Evangelist

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  3. devixluvic

    devixluvic Newbie

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    Does Apple limit using any USB cdrom? or is it just the apple Superdrive that is limited to which computers it can be used on?
     
  4. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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  5. kornchild2002

    kornchild2002 Notebook Deity

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    It's just the SuperDrive. Right now, I have the Toshiba HD-DVD drive made for the Xbox 360 hooked up to my Mac via USB 2.0. It recognizes everything just fine as it should. Audio CDs, DVDs, HD-DVD titles (both single and dual-layer), DVD-R, DVD+R, CD-R, and CD-RW discs (though not for burning) are all accessible through OS X. It does get confused when I put an HD-DVD disc in as OS X recognizes it as being a DVD. However, the HD-DVD software I have plays them back without issues.

    I'm pretty sure it's just the USB SuperDrive. I've seen people put their internal SuperDrives in a USB enclosure and they work, it must be something in the external SuperDrive that limits it to compatibility with just Macs that don't have built-in optical drives (without hacking).
     
  6. bishop225

    bishop225 Notebook Guru

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    I know this probably gets asked a million times, but are there any real disadvantages to running windows full time on a MBp? With the lightness, thinness, battery life, screen, mag charger, keyboard, and touch pad of the MBp, im considering just getting a MBp and running windows on it full time. Is this a bad idea? Are there any hidden things im missing? Basically I dont want to switch to a MBp becuase of one of the above features and it not work in windows.

    I do a lot of document creation (word + corel), web surfing (chrome), and some mild gaming (guild wars 2).

    Alternatives would be a MSI gs60 with 3k screen or lenovo y50 with 4k screen
     
  7. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Prophet

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    These four items are reasons to not run Windows full time on a Mac. Let's break it down:

    Battery life: OS X has many under-skin optimizations to squeeze maximum battery life out of the system. If you run Windows, you will see a decrease in battery life. How much depends on which Mac you are looking to purchase. Models with only integrated graphics (Iris on the 13-inch, Iris Pro on the 15-inch) fare better than the MacBook Pro that has GeForce 750M. This is because the NVIDIA GPU is active at all times while running Windows; there is no graphic switching like you would find on a comparable Windows-only machine.

    Screen: The Retina display doesn't work exceptionally well in Windows. You need Windows 8.1 in order to have acceptable quality and proper scaling. With Windows 7, you need to run the display at its native resolution (2560x1600 on the 13-inch, 2880x1800 on the 15) with zoom/scaling jacked up to 199% (beyond this, it looks very strange) in order to have a fighting chance at being able to see what you're doing.

    Keyboard: The keyboard takes some getting used to as there's only one control key. You could re-map the alt/option key, as there are two of them, but again, this won't be an issue on a standard Windows notebook. Also, if you're going to be number crunching in Excel, the Mac's lack of a built-in number pad is a pain.

    Touchpad: OS X is what makes the Mac's touchpad great. You won't get this with Windows. Someone has tried to hack OS X style gestures into a Windows driver set, but it doesn't always work correctly.
     
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  8. bishop225

    bishop225 Notebook Guru

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    wow... THANK YOU. I would have been sorely disappointed....
     
  9. mmoy

    mmoy Notebook Deity

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    I definitely agree with what saturnotaku wrote. If you want to run Windows, get a Windows laptop.

    I have BootCamp Windows and VM Windows on my MacBook Pro (so that's $250 that I paid to Microsoft for licenses) and I never use them anymore because there is so much software that runs on Mac OS X. My last holdout was my tax software but I switched to TurboTax Mac. I used to use the Windows VM to log into the office but I use Ubuntu now instead because it has the nice, native X-server. BTW, I can log into the office directly using Mac OS X but then the Mac is on the office network. The advantage to using a VM is that I can run two separate networks at the same time.
     
  10. AbootCanada

    AbootCanada Notebook Enthusiast

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    Has anyone downloaded the Nvidia 337.88 drivers for the 750m? Are there any problems?
     
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