Rumored TGP of Nvidia cards

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by yosv211, Aug 30, 2020.

  1. yosv211

    yosv211 Notebook Consultant

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    Just ahead of the September launch, specifications of NVIDIA's upcoming RTX Ampere lineup have been leaked by industry sources over at VideoCardz. According to the website, three alleged GeForce SKUs are being launched in September - RTX 3090, RTX 3080, and RTX 3070. The new lineup features major improvements: 2nd generation ray-tracing cores and 3rd generation tensor cores made for AI and ML. When it comes to connectivity and I/O, the new cards use the PCIe 4.0 interface and have support for the latest display outputs like HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 1.4a.

    The GeForce RTX 3090 comes with 24 GB of GDDR6X memory running on a 384-bit bus at 19.5 Gbps. This gives a memory bandwidth capacity of 936 GB/s. The card features the GA102-300 GPU with 5,248 CUDA cores running at 1695 MHz, and is rated for 350 W TGP (board power). While the Founders Edition cards will use NVIDIA's new 12-pin power connector, non-Founders Edition cards, from board partners like ASUS, MSI and Gigabyte, will be powered by two 8-pin connectors. Next up is specs for the GeForce RTX 3080, a GA102-200 based card that has 4,352 CUDA cores running at 1710 MHz, paired with 10 GB of GDDR6X memory running at 19 Gbps. The memory is connected with a 320-bit bus that achieves 760 GB/s bandwidth. The board is rated at 320 W and the card is designed to be powered by dual 8-pin connectors. And finally, there is the GeForce RTX 3070, which is built around the GA104-300 GPU with a yet unknown number of CUDA cores. We only know that it has the older non-X GDDR6 memory that runs at 16 Gbps speed on a 256-bit bus. The GPUs are supposedly manufactured on TSMC's 7 nm process, possibly the EUV variant.


    I got the above rumored info from Techpower up forums.

    I would hate to see the 3000 cards in laptops, they would have to be heavily throttled to get it not to blow up the laptop.
    The 2070 is a 175w card but in laptops its 115w, this 3070 is rumored to be 320w but will Nvidia stay with the same wattage of 115w or maybe increase it to 150w which is 2080 mobile territory.
    I guess all laptops will be max-q designs with the 3000 cards
     
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  2. hfm

    hfm Notebook Prophet

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    Those TDP are lower than the rumored ones I heard, which is a little promising. It looks like moving to the 3080 will be about 50W higher than my existing 2070 which should still be OK in my Sonnet Breakway Box 550, as long as it actually fits! LOL!
     
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  3. aarpcard

    aarpcard Notebook Deity

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    I doubt laptops will get a Desktop 3090 (i.e. something with 5248 cuda cores). I hope they do, but I doubt it.

    Keep in mind TDP is roughly going to be 30% lower than TGP.

    The P870TM1 has a cooling capacity for the gpus of about 400 Watts. With some minor modifications 500+ Watts of cooling is fairly easily obtainable. The problem isn't laptops can't handle high TGP/TDP cards and shouldn't get them. The problem is thin laptops with BGA solutions don't have the room for the required cooling and therefore have no business (IMO) being equipped with cards like these.

    High performance notebooks should be large enough to handle the cooling required - as they have been in the past.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
  4. yosv211

    yosv211 Notebook Consultant

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    The issue is I'm not going to lug around a 10lb laptop like I did with a clevo p370sm3.
    I like this msi ge75 at 5.4lb.
     
  5. aarpcard

    aarpcard Notebook Deity

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    Then buy a slim + light laptop with BGA components and don't expect to get anywhere near desktop class performance. Just because certain folks are willing to make that compromise doesn't mean others are. And it doesn't mean one aspect of the market should dictate what the entire market gets. Let the thin laptops get stripped down cards, and the bulky laptops get full fledged cards and let the consumer have the option of picking which one they want to buy.
     
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  6. hfm

    hfm Notebook Prophet

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    If the market exists for them and people want to buy them the products will exist. I'm sure MSI and Clevo will do something, they always do.
     
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  7. NuclearLizard

    NuclearLizard Notebook Deity

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    We'll probably see a titan successor or something the like.

    Not gonna lie, really excited to see how the cards fall when the laptops start coming.
     
  8. Clamibot

    Clamibot Notebook Evangelist

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    I gotta say I'm very happy about the specs of the new cards. They weren't at all what I was expecting.

    I was expecting a significant increase in performance over the Turing cards, and we got what looks like a colossal increase in performance instead. The core counts on these cards are twice what they were rumored to be. Of course we'll have to see how that translates into real world performance, but man, the 10,496 cores on the RTX 3090 is a buttload of cores! There's no way you won't get insane performance out of that thing.

    I don't know if I would call carrying a 10 pound laptop lugging it around. 10 pounds isn't heavy. I'm not sure why so many people feel a 10 pound laptop is heavy. This mentality is kinda destroying performance laptops.

    That said, there are use cases for thin and light laptops, but a performance laptop should not be thin and light. It needs enough room for a beefy cooling system.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2020
  9. yosv211

    yosv211 Notebook Consultant

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    I was surprised at the prices of the 3070 and 3080, but the specs is what really got me.
    With these large specs and power draw, I now wonder if Nvidia will use the 3060 and call it a 3080 mobile.
     
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  10. Clamibot

    Clamibot Notebook Evangelist

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    That really wouldn't surprise me. Intel does something similar with mobile CPUs to pass off weaker parts as just as good as desktop CPUs to the average buyer. However we know that desktop CPUs of every performance tier outperform their mobile equivalents.

    I was hoping for Max-Crap to go away. The gap between mobile and desktop GPUs was almost completely closed with the Pascal generation. Now it's widening again.
     
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