Ripped off? Yup...

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by CanadianDude, Jan 18, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Kuu

    Kuu That Quiet Person

    Reputations:
    765
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Too bad you can't buy cars online D:

    That sounds like a mess, I didn't even know you could get tire insurance ._.
     
  2. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

    Reputations:
    3,047
    Messages:
    8,657
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    206
    You can. Generally, tires arent covered if the damage isn't caused by defect. For example, if you run over a nail and the tire is punctured- you could be out for the cost of the tire. The insurance for all 4 tires usually is wrapped into some other service (rotation and balance/align every 5k miles, for example), and costs some smallish double digit number. The tires themselves are generally 600$ or so, and 1000$ insurance makes no sense. Remind me to take out a $10k insurance policy on my laptop (which they will obviously just replace, not pay cash)

    Also, FYI, you can buy online. EBay motors has some decent deals. The real method is to do research, select a model and year (or small year range), and a desired mileage limit. Then, hunt Craigslist and other classifieds for the model you chose, and find one in good condition, and hire yourself a mechanic to check the car before you commit to buy.
     
  3. Kuu

    Kuu That Quiet Person

    Reputations:
    765
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Good to know, I just got my car smog tested but they've told me I might want to start looking for a new one soon, so I was looking at some Lancers s:

    Luckily I have a "family" mechanic that I fix his families computers for, so even tradeoff :D
     
  4. CanadianDude

    CanadianDude Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    507
    Messages:
    1,476
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    56
    I'm beginning to think this is what the finance people were thinking...

    "Hey, this guy signed already. If he gets approved and he ends up making all the payments we can make some serious cash. If not, we can get the car back and he'll be screwed. It's a win-win for us, so lets approve him."
     
  5. MAA83

    MAA83 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    794
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    31
    That's how they all hustle, hell that's how the seedy ones make their business - they're counting on you to default on your loan, but they'll give you extensions and grace periods to milk out every last dollar, and then they'll be like ooooh well sorry you've just been late too many times we gotta repo the car. They get all your money and their car back! Drop the sales price some, rinse, repeat!
     
  6. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

    Reputations:
    3,047
    Messages:
    8,657
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    206
    What's really sick is that you could very conceivably end up in a situation where you are drained for more than the car is worth, but less than you owe, and you can't afford to make more payments.

    I could easily imagine them ending up with the value of the car (or more) in cash from you AND the car.
     
  7. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    192
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Who "rust proofs" a used car? Seriously, you can't "rust proof" a used car, at least not to good effect, as it presumable has been on the road in the winter and already has been exposed to salt. On a 3 or 4 year old car, rustproofing is just applying undercoat to steel that has already been exposed to 3 or 4 winters.

    The "tire insurance" is also quite a novelty. I've never heard about that one. I'm not sure how that would even work. Considering your brother has 6 years of payments on a car that's up to 4 years old, he'll probably need some tires. I'd be very interested in the terms of that insurance policy.

    Keep in mind that Canada has very poor consumer protection laws, and very limited enforcement, in comparison to many American states.

    In the end though, it's your brother's decision. The best course of action is to say, "Nice car!" and "Great deal!" regardless of where or not its the truth. Try not to roll your eyes. If you've taken a course in Advanced Sarcasm, you can always try this line, "Golly, you've done such a good job negotiating this sweet deal on a cherry Civic, I'll have to remember to bring you along the next time I need to buy a car."

    With family, it's best to always be supportive.
     
  8. ramgen

    ramgen -- Morgan Stanley --

    Reputations:
    513
    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Yup, so that his brother will be encouraged to sign-up another stupid sales agreement the next day with all these support and compliments. :D

    There is no point to say "great deal" on such a miserable failure. Just be honest and tell him that what he did is a plain bs and ask/warn him not to sign-up *any* paperwork if there is no one with a positive IQ around him from his family.


    --
     
  9. millermagic

    millermagic Rockin the pinktop

    Reputations:
    330
    Messages:
    1,743
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Any time "finance" is involved in something that loses something as fast as a car, yes, you got ripped off.

    And I got my brand new 2011 Focus for less than that. Financed at a lower interest rate, too and did a MUCH larger downpayment (most liekly)
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Ripped
  1. Baqir
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    1,136
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page