Replacing CPU Cooling Fan / Heat Sink Assembly

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by moviemarketing, Jun 29, 2015.

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  1. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    The CPU cooling fan on my hp envy 15-1100T is starting to make some noise that sounds like the bearings have deteriorated and need replacing. Also occasionally when booting I get a BIOS error message indicating there is a problem with the CPU cooling fan and the laptop won't start.

    I've ordered HP part 576837-001 processor fan and thermal heat sink assembly from China

    [​IMG]

    I know how to open the laptop chassis and clean dust from the interior, replace hard drive, etc., but I've never attempted anything more elaborate like thermal repaste.

    Is it relatively simple to replace the CPU fan and heat sink assembly? Or should I take it to a professional and have them install the replacement part?
     
  2. RainMan_

    RainMan_ Notebook Evangelist

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    I'd say it's pretty simple, but you have to clean the old paste off the CPU and GPU using isopropyl alcohol and apply a new one, you'll find a lot of guides here on how to apply thermal paste.
     
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  3. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    Thanks MPIX! I opened up the laptop and it does seem simple to replace.

    I noticed that one of the fans seems to work just fine but the second one does not move at all.
     
  4. RainMan_

    RainMan_ Notebook Evangelist

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    You are referring to the old fans or the new ones? Let us know how it went.
     
  5. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    Just received the Cooling Fan assembly and thermal paste, gonna try to do this tomorrow.

    The main thing I'm worried about is applying the paste correctly. Do I make one small bead in the center of the heat sink surface? I have also heard suggestions to make five beads (one in each corner, and one in the center) or other suggestions to spread it out evenly with a credit card.

    EDIT: here is a guide I found - does this seem like good advice? http://www.tomsguide.com/us/Laptop-Notebook-Overheating,review-1596-9.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2015
  6. RainMan_

    RainMan_ Notebook Evangelist

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    If your chip is rectangular, use the line method. If it's square use the dot method, and let the pressure of the heatsink spread it. Do not touch the paste with your hands and never use the credit card method, it leaves a lot of air gaps. Also make sure to have the chips and the heatsink cleaned before applying thermal paste ( preferably with alcohol ) to completely remove the traces of the old paste.

    I attached a picture for the line method on your CPU ( i7 820QM ). Good luck!
     

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  7. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    A line or an X pattern is usually the best. Multiple dots/beads do not seem like a good process.
     
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  8. moviemarketing

    moviemarketing Milk Drinker

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    Wow, thank you both so much - awesome to be able to see this correctly applied on the same processor!

    One more question - OK to use 97% isopropyl alcohol to clean the heat sink and CPU?
     
  9. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    160 Proof Vodka is better - you can drink whatever is left over. :)

    J/K!!!

    Yeah, 97% isopropyl alcohol is good.
     
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  10. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

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    97%, not enough. :p
    [​IMG]
    Seriously, 97% alcohol is fine. Technically, you could even use water, it just takes forever to dry and isopropyl alcohol is a better solvent for the TIM as far as I know anyways.

    I also agree with the line method, a dot is nice for a square sized die, but if it's a rectangle, a line is better to ensure there is uniform TIM on the whole surface.
     
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