Recommendation for video editing laptop?

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by Lambda808, May 20, 2020.

  1. Lambda808

    Lambda808 Notebook Consultant

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    Totally. Thanks for the explanation. I'll check out some of the zbooks, although I really don't know anything about them. From what I see they're geared more towards work. Which is fine. But like I said I don't have a desktop or anything. My laptop acts as my work + gaming machine. Which zbook dyou recommend I look into for my needs and budget ($2000-2500)?
    The zbook 17 looks pretty solid but..... damn that size :( looks almost bigger than my current Alienware 17.
     
  2. Ring_Nut

    Ring_Nut Notebook Enthusiast

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    How do any of y'all feel about the Nvidia Studio products?

    I've been using a Dell XPS 15, 9650 (i7, 16gb ram, 1050) for three years to do photo and video work along side my general theatre design and production work. Due to the shutdown, I had to turn around VERY quickly a 1.5 hour video for an awards ceremony, which beat the absolute snot out of this PC. It took 8.5 hours to render the file out. I know it's been having some major thermal issues (I did replace the thermal paste and undervolt it which helped) once it gets soaked with heat (like on a long render). My boss said he'd be willing to pony up for an upgrade for me (passing this to the yearbook/photography teacher where I think it will do just fine).

    The MSI Creator 17 look very intersting, but I have zero experience with them as far as keyboards, track pads, screens and cooling.
    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/prod...uhd_hdr1000.html?SID=s1591797461976u0lma52439

    I do love the keyboard and track pad on my XPS. It's an absolute dream for me to type on and use for most of my work. But since school might be virtual again, I need something where I can produce a good amount of high quality work (After Effects/Fusion/Blender additions) for my school and other gigs. It has had a few hiccups with the audio jack popping (I run sound cues from it, which makes it a problem, I fixed it with a USB audio connection, but I am not a fan of the dongle life!) and the SD card reader being very temperamental.

    I will be very curious to see how the XPS 17 is able to cope with the amount of heat and the newer intel chips.
     
  3. penguinslider

    penguinslider Notebook Consultant

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    Like I told the OP... thin and lights laptops are meant for quick burst of high utilization, not hour long renders with things being maxed out.... that MSI creator laptop is in the same category as your current XP15. I suspect that it will do slight better in thermal performance because its newer but I would expect similar render times.

    PS.
    If you gonna do more of those 8.5 hour renders... I would suggest removing the battery and buy a cooling pad or raise it so that the vents are more exposed., unless you want a nice bump on on the track pad of your XPS15 :D . Don't ask me how I know this.:)
     
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  4. Ring_Nut

    Ring_Nut Notebook Enthusiast

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    Actually, on any render, I have a couple of pieces of wood that I place under the bottom pad to elevate it. I also keep my house super cold at night =) Hopefully I won't be pulling anymore 8.5 hour renders. I realized a stupid mistake by me was not breaking down my timeline into chunks. If I had rendered 20 minute segments over a few days, it would have been much easier!
     
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  5. Lambda808

    Lambda808 Notebook Consultant

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    Dyou have any recommendations? I'm a little lost now. You seem to be right about the big loads for light laptops. I just don't know what my best bet will be. All the laptops that seem to be geared towards creative work with calibrated monitors etc are pretty thin. Or cost like $5000. I don't mind going with alienware again but people are really talking a lot of trash on their new line that came out. Ideally I'd really like to go for the xps17 when it comes out but I'm worried about what you mentioned cause sometimes I do heavy editing like 8hrs a day.
     
  6. penguinslider

    penguinslider Notebook Consultant

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    To be honest, I don't like the choices choices for editors laptops.

    Just for some background, I am the opposite of the other guy, I am a Dell fanboy. :D

    I currently have a Dell Precision 7510, I love it. I use primarily for photography but I can play games on it for hours that max out the GPU and CPU. You can hear the fans and you will need to raise the bottom but the temperatures are steady at around 85c at the most for HOURS and I live in a humid Asian country with no air conditioning.

    I manage a lot of computer endpoints and I like how Dell makes my job easy; my end users are not exactly gentle with their computers and the warranty is fantastic if you know how to navigate the system.

    For the hate on the thermal performance on Alienware, some of it is deserving. The Alienware side of things is suffering from poor design choices recently. My takeaway is that you need to at least repaste the laptop.... amongst the choices, the only Alienware laptop I can currently recommend is the M15 or M17 R1 from last year which is still good but the 4k UHD panel is no longer available on the 17 inch model as of the time of this post.... the R2 and R3 versions are junk based on the reviews I have seen. I can't even recommend the chunkier Alienware Area-51M at this point unless you have a ridiculous budget.

    In line with that, my recommendation does not fit your budget. My recommendation would be a mobile workstation class laptop. A Dell Precision 7750 or a Lenovo P73 (but as a Dell Fanboy, I would the recommend the 7750 more). Reasons are:
    • Excellent build quality, good for travelling.
    • Excellent business warranty service from Dell. If you travel a lot, you can even get support overseas.
    • Excellent cooling solution
    • Still travel friendly I think.
    • Confgurable with Xenon and Quadro hardware which is supposedly more stable video editing or CAD software.

    The big caveat is price, to configure the laptop for the bear minimum for 4k editing and even with the plan of installing parts your self (Dell warranty is not void when you install parts yourself)... it will cost you over USD 3,000.00 :(

    https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/sho...rationid=593c02a2-25ae-4339-8028-cc9b81c2bf66

    Precision 7750 Mobile Workstation
    Dell Price$3,090.97
    • Intel Core Processor i7-10750H (6 Core, 12MB Cache, 2.60 GHz to 5.00 GHz, 45W)
    • NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 w/6GB GDDR6
    • 17.3" UHD, 3840x2160, 60Hz, Anti-Glare, Non-Touch, 100% Adobe, 500 Nits,WVA,IRCamMic/WLAN
    • M.2 256GB PCIe NVMe Class 35 Solid State Drive
    • 6 Cell 95Whr ExpressCharge Capable Battery
    • Basic Onsite Service 36 Months, 36 Month(s)
    • Internal Single Pointing Backlit Keyboard, US English
    Aftermarket upgrades
    • 2 sticks of 1tb M.2 SSD NVME = USD 360.00
    • 32 GB RAM = USD 140.00

    Total of around USD 3,600.00 :eek:

    Circling back to the beginning, I don't like the laptop choices for us creators. The general trend in laptops is moving towards the thin and light category which as mentioned, don't handle heat well. The ones that do handle heat well sacrifice the space for the mechanical spinning hard drive to be smaller which drives the cost up to have adequate storage up as you have to fulfill your storage needs with M.2 sticks.

    I can't thing of anything else given your described use, especially because of the travel and the long hours of rendering requirement. Other choices make sacrifices in cooling ability, build quality or warranty services.

    To end this rant, this is why I don't do video editing and stick to only photography :p:p:p:p
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2020
  7. penguinslider

    penguinslider Notebook Consultant

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    ooooohhhh, if you get the older 7740 with its older processor, its around USD 500 cheaper for the same config.

    Precision 7740 Mobile Workstation
    Dell Price$2,427.19

    https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/sho...rationid=8c817670-224f-4f74-a2c3-34d6dd2fc61b

    Intel Core Processor i7-9750H (6 Core, 12M Cache, 2.60GHz up to 4.5GHz Turbo, 45W)
    Windows 10 Pro 64bit English, French, Spanish
    Radeon Pro WX 7130 w/8GB GDDR5
    17.3"UltraSharp™ UHD 3840x2160 AG,NT, w/Prem Panel Guar 100% Adobe Aluminum,IGZO,IR Cam/Mic No WWAN
    8GB, 1x8GB, DDR4 2666MHz Non-ECC Memory
    6-cell 97Wh Lithium Ion battery with ExpressCharge™
    Basic Onsite Service 36 Months, 36 Month(s)
    Internal Single Pointing Backlit Keyboard, US English

    Aftermarket upgrades
    2 sticks of 1tb M.2 SSD NVME = USD 360.00
    32 GB RAM = USD 140.00

    Total of Around USD 3,000.00
     
  8. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    @penguinslider the positive of the more expensive ssd drives compared to spinning platters for us creatives, is reliability. Less can go wrong with a ssd drive.
     
  9. Lambda808

    Lambda808 Notebook Consultant

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    Thanks for the suggestion. I think those options would work but unfortunately out of the budget range.
    So im still rather lost. People seem to be very weary of the thin laptop options. But the thicker ones are either too expensive or just crappy builds like the recent alienwares. Is the downside with the lack of ventilation in thinner ones that it'll lead to damaged components or that it'll throttle stuff or what? As long as I have a protection plan would I be alright?

    There's been so much good input but it's made the decision even harder now and I have to pull the trigger on something soon. If the concerns about the thin laptops is being a bit picky let me know. I've been using an Alienware 17 for years now and it's actually done pretty well. I have few complaints other than it just being too outdated now. But it is damn thick. Perhaps why it performed so well over the years.

    I was looking at Dells new G7 gaming laptop too. Any thoughts on that?
     
  10. Charles P. Jefferies

    Charles P. Jefferies Lead Moderator Super Moderator

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    I would ignore whether a laptop is thin/thick and focus on its component temperatures. It's possible for a thin laptop to have acceptable cooling and a thick laptop to have terrible cooling, so don't assume one way or another. If anyone owns a given notebook and wants to talk about it, there's a good chance you'll find them on these forums, so visit our manufacturer subforums and ask questions.

    That aside, excess heat is a bad thing for electronics of any kind. In notebooks, maximum acceptable CPU and GPU temperatures are in the upper 80 degree C range. Notebooks that run hotter than that may, in some cases, be rescued by applying better thermal paste and undervolting (look into ThrottleStop, a must with Intel chips). In fact, some notebook makers like Acer have been sending some of their notebooks undervolted from the factory.

    It might be best at this point to fill out the FAQ so we can reassess your needs and provide some recommenations.

    Charles
     
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