Readyboost on USB 3.0

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by FlipBack, May 7, 2011.

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  1. chimpanzee

    chimpanzee Notebook Virtuoso

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    indeed. I haven't seen a flash drive that saturate USB 2.0 yet. Many people forget that the speed of SSD(not just the latency but throughput) comes from its channels (8/10), not because of the NAND.
     
  2. Karamazovmm

    Karamazovmm Overthinking? Always!

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    Agreed, I remember the ruckus that was when people discovered that kingston was ''pirating'' itself, basically they launched 2 different lines of thumb drives, one with a good controller and one with some controller. So they sold the latter as pirate products and the former as legit products. The problem was that there were mix ups, and a lot of the some controller went to legit retail stores, when it was discovered there was some not pleased costumers like me that got affected by this, the some controller has half the transfer rate of an ''original'' drive.
     
  3. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    ReadyBoost doesn't work unless you're limited on RAM, and 4GB isn't limited, more like 1GB RAM. It was meant as a temporary stop gap to improve performance until you got more RAM. But with 8GB RAM kits so cheap, best to just invest in it and be done. In theory it sounds great, and while some benchmarks may show improvements, I doubt you'd be able to tell any difference. If you have an SSD it may actually hinder performance because it'll be much slower than any SSD.

    Even if it is USB 3.0 it all depends on the 512KB and 4KB performance of the flash drive too.
     
  4. jaisah

    jaisah Notebook Enthusiast

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    You guys are missing the point. A usb3.0 drive can be used for more than just readyboost whereas ram is just ram. The original question was about whether a usb3.0 readyboost drive will increase performance, stop suggesting buying ram or ssd. I am in a similar position, i want to buy a new usb drive and am considering a 16gb usb3.0 sony with a rated read speed of 120mb/s. Would a drive that fast help if i use it for readyboost? Keep in mind it will be used for other stuff too so dont suggest buying more ram!
     
  5. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    Ready boost is there to help the drive out, not the CPU, GPU or Ram. What it does is load from the HDD comonly used files and apps. It does this right after boot. Where as spare ram also caches files eventually these files can get flushed where they are more easdily available from the SSD. It usually does this with the smaller fies as the stream speed of a usb drive is slower the access time is much faster.

    So if you have a non hybrid HDD this can help boot and load times. The slower the drive RPM the more it will help. You may see and feel a bit more snapyness in some places but there is no real synthetic bencmark, other than say a boot timer, that will show a significant benefit.................
     
  6. trvelbug

    trvelbug Notebook Virtuoso

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    so its basically like a poor man's hybrid drive. i think it only caches windows system files and not programs. i think it would have some some boot time benefits for 5400 hdds. wonder if its of any benefit for systems with 7200 or faster.
     
  7. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    Actually the hybrid drive is better as it caches all within its buffer. Also the buffer does not need to load nor does it differntiate between data,MFT or executables etc.

    As far as boot times etc it does somewhat help 7,200's but yes it is much more of benefit to a 5,400......................
     
  8. davepermen

    davepermen Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    actually, it's the usb 2.0 protocol that does not allow them to go any faster. usb 3 sticks that are much faster are out there already, quite a few.

    it's a messed up file transfer protocoll in the usb 2.0 standard that does not allow you to go beyond 25 or so MB/s without a special non-standard driver. so far, i know of only one external hdd maker that created that. one could go up to 45MB/s or something on that drive, was quite cool. and on systems without the driver, it took the ordinary usb2.0 protocoll and was back to the ~25MB/s

    i had usb3 sticks with >70MB/s, so they definitely exist. sadly, one can not boot from them in usb3 mode, which made my concept of installing-windows-from-usb3 mood.

    to the op:
    if you have it lying around and are not using it, just try it. there's no harm. most likely, there's no gain as well. but trying doesn't cost you anything.

    and then, get more ram. in the new system, as you stated.
     
  9. wildman_33

    wildman_33 Notebook Evangelist

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    My corsair flash voyager 32gb will easily saturate usb 2.0 bandwidth although in comparison to a fast hdd or an ssd it is pretty slow and ready boost is useless anyway.

    I'd strongly recommend upgrading ram at the minute while its cheap, my 8gb DDR3 crucial memory only cost me £35 and combined with the £115 120gb Agility 3 i got, I now have a very fast system
     
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