Razer Blade Pro Early 2017 CPU & GPU Tweaks (Some tweaks apply for Late 2016 model)

Discussion in 'Razer' started by Hackintoshihope, Aug 1, 2017.

  1. Hackintoshihope

    Hackintoshihope AlienMeetsApple

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    Let us begin with why this thread is important,

    Problem #1: A lot of Razer Blade Pro owners of the late 2016 and early 2017 models experience so called "random" shutdowns while gaming. These are in fact not random at all and are caused by the machine drawing more power or attempting to draw more power then the Razer Blade Pro can supply. Symptoms of this can be your backlight dimming, your keyboard and other led lights dimming all happening while gaming usually following this a complete shutdown of the system.

    Problem #2: Overclocking the CPU (2017 model only) is extremely limited with Razer Synapse and trying to modify these values within other programs like Intel XTU is impossible due to how Razer Synapse modifies these values constantly.

    With the two most important problems of the Razer blade pro outlined lets list out some solutions,

    Background for the solution to problem #1: Power draw is affected by things like how high the brightness of your screen is, how high your volume is, if your led's are on or off, how high of brightness these led's are and finally clock rate and voltage settings of the GPU and CPU. If these values are high enough, your Razer Blade will most certainly attempt to draw far more then the design spec of 250W (which is the limit of the PSU that comes with our Razer Blade's) to check this out in motion why not see how much power your blade is drawing by buying something like this: Watt Meter regardless I can tell you that it indeed draws around 250 to 255W and any further the laptop shuts down.

    Solution to Problem #1: First we want to control power draw the ways we actually can with our systems. Also we wish to do this with items that are feasible. For instance we do not want to play with no volume or no brightness on our display or keyboard do we? So in this case we can adjust the voltage and clock rates of our GPU and CPU.

    GPU: First you are going to want to install this MSI Afterburner and this HWINFO. MSI Afterburner will allow you to adjust clockrates for the GPU and thus lower power consumption. To do this you will open MSI Afterburner and once in in the program press the CTRL key and the F key at the same time on the keyboard to get to the voltage curve configuration. Then simply match those values on screen with mine below. You will also want to be sure and open HWINFO which I linked to monitor items like temperature and power usage.

    GPU Configuration:
    [​IMG]

    CPU: First you are going to want to install this Intel XTU and install it. This will allow you to overclock (not on the 2016 model) and underclock your CPU. However for this section and usage we are going to simply undervolt our CPU this will save on power consumption and allow the laptop to always stay powered on. Once the program is installed simply open up Intel XTU and try a core voltage offset of something like -100mv (please note this should also change the cache voltage offset, if it does not you can set that as well to the same value). Anything more than this could cause instability, but you are welcome to try.

    CPU Configuration:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    These above suggestions should allow you to now play games and do anything on your razer without terrible shutdowns or dimming. If you have questions or suggestions for problem #1 please let me know. Otherwise let us now move on to the solution to problem #2.

    Background to for the solution to problem #2: Overclocking your CPU in an unlocked machine such as the Razer Blade Pro should be an easy and featured filled process, in reality it is far from it. As Razer Synapse has a scanning service that disables you from changing settings within Intel XTU and due to this settings in Intel XTU are reset occasionally and are not reliable.

    Solution to problem #2: To allow for our Razer Blade Pro's to be properly overclocked and not have Razer Synapse constantly change our settings we must simply disable the RzPerformance service in windows. To do this simply open up the services menu in windows and right click the RzPerformance service press properties and then once in properties stop the service and disable it. After this restart your computer.

    RzPerformance Service:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    These above suggestions should allow you now to overclock your Razer Blade Pro how you see fit without Razer Synapse interfering. If you have any questions about the solution to problem #2 please let me know. Otherwise we can now discuss in this thread about other problems regarding performance of the machine...
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
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  2. slimjim8201

    slimjim8201 Notebook Consultant

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    With all factory settings, I only very rarely saw system shutdowns, but they were almost certainly due to excess power draw. Under normal circumstances, I have the lid closed, and the video output going to an external monitor. This saves a pretty decent amount of power on its own. On top of that, I do have the CPU undervolted 100mV and have the GPU underclocked in a very similar fashion to what you outlined above. The GPU underclocking has little to no penalty in-game or during various benchmarks as the clock rate tends to hover around 1750-1850 in most situations. After these changes, Neither the CPU nor the GPU will exceed 80C very often and fan noise is greatly reduced (a nice bonus).

    I'm glad you've dug in to the relationship between Synapse and XTU. I've been running with Synapse in balanced mode, which calls for near-factory multipliers for the various core load states. I would not recommend leveraging the performance mode as this simply jacks up all of the multipliers to a flat 43x. In balanced mode, at full CPU utilization during an AIDA64 FPU stress test, the CPU draws just under 44W AFTER a 100mV voltage offset. Before the offset, power will hover around 50W, thermal throttling will likely take place and/or the system will cut power to the CPU to get under the 45W maximum after 20-30 seconds.

    Now, benchmarks being the "dyno runs" of the computer world, they do not necessarily represent how the machine will perform in real life. No game on the market utilizes a CPU so completely like a stress test and thus, no game pulls anywhere close to 100% power even in a full core load state. For example, at various resolutions and frame rates, my CPU will rarely, if ever pull more than 20W in PUBG, at factory CPU settings. I'm free to overclock the living daylights out of the CPU for this and other similar applications since there exists 25W of power headroom and 25C of thermal headroom.

    @Hackintoshihope great suggestion for disabling RzPerformance. It's tiring having to go back into XTU frequently to ensure that the settings are persistent. Synapse was occasionally resetting my voltage offset as well.
     
  3. Hackintoshihope

    Hackintoshihope AlienMeetsApple

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    RzPerformance was reseting everything for me and causing my overclocks or underclocks to be useless after a while since no of my settings would stick. Anyway hopefully this more extensive right up will help others having similar issues.
     
  4. Nuke33

    Nuke33 Notebook Consultant

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    I would suggest you use ThrottleStop instead of XTU. It has more fine grained and advanced settings.
    So you can circumvent instability of undervolts lower than -100mv. XTU sets Core and Cache, which actually is the Ringbus, voltage simultaneously. Since the Ringbus(CPU Cache) is responsible for connecting all parts of the CPU, it is not a wise idea to cause instability by undevolting it too much. Throttlestop can individually set Core,GPU,SA,Ringbus and Analog I/O voltages.
    A nice bonus is having multiple profiles.
    Below you see my settings, which in this combination also reduce latency. Give it a try ;)
    throttlestop.jpg

    But in my opinion the right way is to modify the Bios to allow for such changes. So it applies to all OSes and sticks in every situation.
     
  5. Nuke33

    Nuke33 Notebook Consultant

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    Oh and please disable Monitoring since it causes the system process to use 10%Cpu. That i true for all hardware monitoring tools. It is because of optimus. As soon as the dGPU gets disabled they poll it like crazy. Using the GPU instantly stops this behaviour.
     
  6. Hackintoshihope

    Hackintoshihope AlienMeetsApple

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    Throttlestop and Intel XTU both do the same as the core voltage offset both changes the cache offset as well. Also you still have to disable the RzPerformance to get any of these changes to stick.

    Our systems do not have optimus...
     
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  7. Nuke33

    Nuke33 Notebook Consultant

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    Throttlestop does not change them together. You can set them individually. I have tried and checked with various monitoring tools.
    With more than -100mv in XTU my system did crash. With -125mv Core only in Throttlestop it did not. Primestable 8-4096k FFTs 15min interval for 10h. Disabling RzPerformance is interesting.

    My bad, did not read your title properly. I thought you were talking about the RB14 2017 :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2017
  8. Hackintoshihope

    Hackintoshihope AlienMeetsApple

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    Not a problem, however it does change them both as I monitor it as well. Also on the program itself (Intel XTU) it says it has a -100mv on the core voltage offset but I will add that as well to original post to avoid confusion.
     
  9. Nuke33

    Nuke33 Notebook Consultant

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    Hm that is odd, in my case they are individually set. Maybe bios limitation ?

    cacheoffset.JPG

    Yeah that would probably save a few people some headache :)
    XTU locking them together, is a design flaw in my opinion. Even the most basic desktop boards these days allow for individual settings of those parameters.
     
  10. Hackintoshihope

    Hackintoshihope AlienMeetsApple

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    Well again it’s preference. Also for simplicity sake using XTU will cause the least confusion.

    Not to say they cannot take your advice and try for more undervolting. However -100mv on both is stable for most. As a good middle ground setting.
     
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