Razer Blade Pro 17 2021 RTX 3000

Discussion in 'Razer' started by Joikansai, Feb 1, 2021.

  1. GR8-Ride

    GR8-Ride Notebook Enthusiast

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    From the website, the GE76 isn't a bad looking device, and I could probably take that into a meeting with me without worrying too much about it. And I say this as someone who currently carries a Blade Pro 17 as my work / personal laptop. An awful lot of MSI's prior laptops (especially those with the red & gold accents) I would not have taken into any meetings with me. But most of the industry seems to be moving towards more stealthy laptops, even in the gaming arena.

    I switched from the Blade 15 Advanced to the Blade Pro 17 mostly due to the supposedly better cooling (and the upgrade from 2070 MQ to 2080 MQ, as they had them in-stock in the local Microsoft store). And I still love Razer laptops, but I'm starting to question their reliability (just had to replace the battery in my 12 month old Blade Pro 17), and despite the extra cooling of the Pro 17 vs the Blade 15, the 17 still runs hot. And I haven't found Razer's post-sales support to be that great.

    Honestly the only high-end gaming laptops I would consider would be Alienware or Razer. MSI, Asus and Gigabyte all have some decent units, but I'm even more concerned about post-sales support from any of them than Razer or Dell. I still really want a 2021 Blade 15 Advanced with the QHD display and a 3080, but I'm concerned about thermals, and I'm concerned about fitting 2TB SSDs into the two M.2 slots (since they are stacked). I'm actually seriously contemplating an Alienware m15 R4 and going with the 4K OLED panel. It's more 'gamery' than any Blade (15 or 17), or even most of the MSI / Asus / Gigabyte models, but I find the esthetic is actually quite attractive.

    The Blade 15 Adv is slightly cheaper, and I prefer the 240 Hz / QHD display, but I like Dell's support options much better (on-site repairs vs return-to-factory for Razer).

    And you're right, the Blade Pro 17 is a bit too heavy to drag around on a regular basis.


    Patrick
     
  2. seanwee

    seanwee Father of laptop shunt modding

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    MSI support is ok if you go through msi themselves and not the shop, Asus im not sure but gigabyte seems to be on the poorer side. There will always be bad experiences from any company so its a tricky point to consider. I'd rather just pick a brand that makes reliable laptops to begin with and not bother with their warranty.

    While the m15 R4 is faster than the blade 15 advanced and will cooler than any razer laptop, the 60hz screen may be a big downside though. And as far as i know only razer and asus offer 4k 120hz screens with their laptops.
     
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  3. GR8-Ride

    GR8-Ride Notebook Enthusiast

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    The 60 Hz refresh rate isn't a deal-breaker issue for me, as my main desktop monitor is a 4K, 60 Hz display (43 inch) already. I also picked up one of the Asus ROG Strix XG17 17 inch, 240 Hz FHD panels to travel with.

    I've generally found the build quality on MSI / Asus / Acer / Gigabyte to be a step down from that of Razer / Alienware (including Dell) & Lenovo.
     
  4. seanwee

    seanwee Father of laptop shunt modding

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    Depends on the model, from the ones I've handled personally : Blade 15/17 > Metal zephyrus, GS66 > Plastic Zephyrus, Gigabyte Aero 15, GE66, Lenovo Legion Y540/740 > Alienware M15R2, Acer nitro/Helios, Msi GL65/GP65/GS65, Asus TUF/Strix
     
  5. Joikansai

    Joikansai Notebook Deity

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    How well does the Alienware perform cooling and performance? And I don’t see any blade Advanced performance and cooling users review yet, how do you know that? I only know about how bad cooling on m15 r1 and 2, m17 r3 was good due vapor chamber, but they’re still using similar intel chips which’s bad on this thin light categories. Alienware is even doesn’t have QHD screen option which a huge deal breaker for my upgrade plan, well I don’t also like to carry around the spaceship design though. As for the big 3080 performance, timespy maybe put higher tdp on top but on who play firestrike:D, this users play Cyberpunk on 4K Max out ray tracing both similar FPS on similar city areas 30 to 40ish, around same with my 3070 egpu FYI.
    Blade pro 3080 100 Watt
    https://youtu.be/UE8yDhRMi6M

    GE76 3080 150 Watt.

    Note: I might be wrong but the blade pro user said he’ll upload 4K max gameplay and to me it looks ray tracing ultra.
     
  6. seanwee

    seanwee Father of laptop shunt modding

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    For starters, the M15R4's cooling is the same as the M15R3's cooling, but now the vapour chamber heatsink is used across the whole lineup so its reasonable to assume it'll perform like the M15R3.

    And yes, as I have ranted so many times before, the 3000 series mobile is a scam. The 3080M just has the full 3070 die so it will match the 3070 at best.

    About the design, I was talking to @GR8-Ride, not you. I don't fancy the design as well (too much plastic) but he likes it so who am I to judge.

    Let's not kid ourselves the M15R/M17R series are medium sized laptops, not thin and lights as much as alienware wants to market them that way.
     
  7. GR8-Ride

    GR8-Ride Notebook Enthusiast

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    As someone who used to carry around a Dell XPS 1710 model ten years ago as my work / gaming machine (with GT 450m!), I'm not opposed to a bit of flashy design, nor does my laptop need to weigh under 2 lbs (I did carry a Thinkpad X1 Carbon for awhile...I honestly kept checking my bag to see if it was still inside!) Don't get me wrong, when it comes to the overall industrial design, I do tend to like the Blade 15 / Pro 17 series better than the AW m15/m17 style, but I also like the AW design aesthetic. Especially since I can get it in Lunar Light, which won't be the finger-print magnet that every one of my Blade laptops has been. Yes, I can get a dBrand skin (and have), but that's just another added cost and thing to maintain on the laptop.

    One of the things I like about AW's cooling solution vs Razer, is that the fans exhaust straight out the back, instead of out and up at the bottom of the screen. Not that I'm terribly concerned about screen reliability, but rather simply the fact that any exhaust air has to make that turn when it hits the hinge may have an impact on how efficient the cooler can be. Maybe if you analyzed the airflow properly you would find that there is no difference, and that would be great. When the AW m15-R4 shows up, I'll be able to run some head to head benchmarks and temp tests and see how well the AW competes with the Blade Pro 17. I do agree though, the challenge lies largely with Intel, and not completely with the laptop designers.

    Again, the design aesthetic is personal for each and everyone, and while I still love my Razer Blade design, there is a part of me that values some level of function over form, though form is a bit aspect for me as well. I happen to like the AW design, even though I've traditionally been a very big fan of Razer's design language. I will admit, the lack of a QHD / high-refresh panel from AW was (and still is) one of the factors that holds me back. I've gone with a 4K OLED option (FHD is not enough screen real-estate for productivity), and I actually do more work on my laptops than I game on them. Had Razer had the Blade 15 Adv with QHD in stock, I might have gone with Razer still, despite my serious concerns about their reliability and service & support. As it stands, I can return the AW within 30 days if I'm not satisfied, and I can always either just keep my Blade Pro 17, or wait for Razer to get their Blade 15 QHD models into inventory.
     
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  8. Joikansai

    Joikansai Notebook Deity

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    What, did I mention anything about design!? And no offense there’s no medium size gaming laptop only two to me, 2,5kg+ Tank gaming laptops and 2Kg thin light categories. Oh yes Alienware went to this category pretty late, and m15 r1 failed straight away with the cooling. They are good on tank class, m15 r2 tried to fix it by soldering the ram to keep the form factor, I didn’t see how the cooling on m15 r3 but I heard about great m17 r3 cooling system but heard also that they “cheat“ on cpu power limitation like Razer, not sure though on which model m15/17. Correct me if I’m wrong. Correctly It’s not because they want market it that way but because of the market demands of this thin light categories, in this category Razer and Gigabyte ahead, this’s because as I mentioned here anything 2,5kg is a desktop to me, laptop are only up to 2Kg class, back in 2015 there’s only two options Gigabyte or Razer later MSI comes in this in 2016.
    There’s new category though, ultrabook gaming on under 1,5 like Blade stealth 13 ad followed by Asus on flow 13 and Acer Triton 300se, Asus did some new things though like amd CPUs and 2 in 1 ultrabook Gaming.
     
  9. GR8-Ride

    GR8-Ride Notebook Enthusiast

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    I would disagree with this, as I think there are truly at least three size categories of "gaming" laptops. There is the ultrabook model, which is sub 2kg, and quite honestly does not have the necessary horsepower to run any current triple-AAA games. These are great dual-purpose laptops, especially when paired with an eGPU, but they are generally not capable of playing the latest and greatest AAA games with high detail and high resolution with good frame rates. The Blade Stealth 13 is a great laptop, but there are some limitations (soldered ram, single M.2 slot, U-Series CPU). Things like the XPS 13 and the new Asus ROG Flow X13, which is a pretty interesting idea. Then you have the "mid-size" gaming category, which I would put as the 2-3 kg range. Not quite "thin and light", but also not true desktop replacement type. The Blade 15 / Pro 17 / AW m15/m17 would fall into this category, along with a lot of other mid-sized but still very portable laptops (MSI GE76, Aorus 17G, etc). These are generally 25mm / 1 inch in thickness or less, and as I said, below 3 kg. I personally think this "mid-sized" category is the sweet spot for a blend of performance and portability; larger screens, better cooling, but still very portable, and can potentially have decent enough battery life to make the laptop be a good, dual-purpose unit (work & pleasure). I'm sure you might think 2.5 kg is too heavy, but others make say 3 kg is the cut-off....again, personal preference on that. My Blade Pro 17 weighs in at 2.86 kg (just weighed it tonight on a digital scale), and I've never found it to be an excessive burden to travel with.

    And finally, the desktop replacement units, or those "laptops" that are 3kg and beyond, and often well over 25mm / 1 inch in thickness, and generally have massive power bricks to go with them. You don't really travel with these so much as lug them around, and battery life is often emergency use only, and not a practical element of their design. So technically still a laptop, but not a practical one. AW Area-51m, some of the Acer Predator series, MSI GT76, etc.

    To a certain extent it's splitting hairs, but I would say there are viable target markets for each of the three size categories: road-warriors and casual gamers for the ultrabook crowd (League of Legends and similar gaming category, even some CS:GO / Fortnite ). And then the "thin and light" crowd or mid-sized crowd, which is the Blade 15 / AW m15 / MSI GE76 / MSI Stealth 15m etc) for the folks who still may travel, but want something more capable than an ultrabook, and want to play AAA titles with good framerates and resolution / settings. I'd say this market is pretty strong as well, as there are plenty of folks around like me who want good performance from a subtle (relatively) and fairly portable machine.

    If anything, the 3 kg and up DTR is probably dying off, which is likely why AW hasn't updated the Area-51m lately, nor have Acer or MSI come out with new DTR models like the Predator 21x or GT76 Titan. Those units are really not much more portable than a SFF desktop, still have virtually no battery life (again, not THAT different from an SFF PC), and are generally horrendously over-priced when compared to a well built SFF PC. If LAN parties were still a thing, I'm sure I could build a cost-effective SFF PC with an RTX 30 series (if you can find one), AMD CPU and potentially even H2O cooling that would run circles around any DTR laptop for a fraction of the cost. If I actually had any use for one, I'd be tempted to build one for myself....
     
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  10. seanwee

    seanwee Father of laptop shunt modding

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    here
    Thin and lights are usually 2.3kg and below (maximally 2.4kg) like the blade 15, zephyrus S/G15. Then you have thin and heavier 17 inchers that go up to 2.7kg like the zephyrus S17, blade 17 Pro 2020. The only true thin and light 17 inch is the GS75 at 2.3kg and on the other side of the spectrum the thin and heavy Blade Pro 17 2021 at 3kg.

    Then you have light but not thin laptops like the Acer nitro 5, Asus Tuf and MSI GL series at around 2kg-2.3kg but these are light because they have worse build quality and are made of plastic

    Medium sized laptops start at 2.5kg like the Strix 15, GE66, AW M15. 17 inch medium sized ones start at 2.7kg like the Strix 17, AW M17and GE76.

    The large desktop replacement ones are the Asus GX703, Alienware A51m and GT76 which clock in at 4kg+

    As as short summary of the AW lineup, the R1 and R2 have really bad cooling. The R3 fixed that on the higher end, and the R4 fixed that on the whole lineup. I have no idea on the QC on the heatsinks on the R3 and R4 but it was terrible on the R1 and R2.

    Those are just thin and light 13 inch laptops which serve a very niche category of buyers.

    If your leaving your graphics horsepower at home you're better off getting a desktop and an actual ultrabook.

    Between the small screen, poor keyboard and high price it doesn't fit the bill for most people.
     
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